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View Full Version : A question of Mdf?



Millatime16
17-11-2017, 03:56 PM
Noticed when cutting small tables, the edges (even with a new bit) are very furry.

I know a compression bit is the answer but they are expensive and upper cut spirals have worked in the past.

Is it the quality of the mdf? It seems, the lighter colour it is, the better it cuts (or is that just a coincidence?)

Stuff from Builders yards, Wickes, B & Q seems to waver wildly in quality. Where do you get decent stuff at good prices?

23217

Ger21
17-11-2017, 04:57 PM
Yes, lighter color generally indicates higher quality, often known as super-refined MDF.

I generally use downcuts.

charlieuk
17-11-2017, 05:40 PM
a straight flute generally works ok for me certainly better than that

Millatime16
17-11-2017, 10:13 PM
a straight flute generally works ok for me certainly better than that

Does it plunge well? Know of any good prices on straight flutes?

EddyCurrent
17-11-2017, 10:30 PM
Does it plunge well? Know of any good prices on straight flutes?

here; https://www.toolstation.com/shop/Power+Tool+Accessories/d80/Router+Bits/sd2579/Router+Bit+Straight/p67412

You should use a spiral lead-in because they are not designed to plunge straight down, I use them all the time.

Millatime16
17-11-2017, 10:34 PM
here; https://www.toolstation.com/shop/Power+Tool+Accessories/d80/Router+Bits/sd2579/Router+Bit+Straight/p67412

You should use a spiral lead-in because they are not designed to plunge straight down, I use them all the time.

Thanks, but isn't that a router bit? I'm talking CNC btw.

EddyCurrent
17-11-2017, 10:43 PM
Ha, the router bit has no idea nor cares whether you are using a router or a cnc, in fact I'm suprised you thought there was a difference. (where we are talking about wood products)

Millatime16
17-11-2017, 10:46 PM
Ha, the router bit has no idea nor cares whether you are using a router or a cnc, in fact I'm suprised you thought there was a difference.

Sorry I thought they were different. I just found a straight fluted mill bit that can plunge (specifically for CNC). Will give one of those a try. Thanks for suggestion. :)

EddyCurrent
17-11-2017, 10:47 PM
Plunging is fine but there comes a time when you should look at lead-in moves. What CAM software are you using ?

Millatime16
17-11-2017, 10:58 PM
Plunging is fine but there comes a time when you should look at lead-in moves. What CAM software are you using ?

I would only be plunging 6mm holes and the start of the table edge. I am using V Carve and Mach 3

charlieuk
17-11-2017, 10:59 PM
spiral or ramp it in, I have been getting the real cheap ones from banggood and had good results and about 1-3 each depending on size

Millatime16
17-11-2017, 11:13 PM
spiral or ramp it in, I have been getting the real cheap ones from banggood and had good results and about 1-3 each depending on size

Carbide or HSS?

charlieuk
17-11-2017, 11:55 PM
carbide

EddyCurrent
18-11-2017, 12:24 PM
Plunging can leave marks on the edge, ramping into the cut is a far better method.

Measure the thickness of the MDF, if it's more than nominal then it likely has moisture content and that can make it fluffy.
ONLY if it's dry, a coat of spirit sanding sealer helps to keep it dry and also penetrates and consolidates the surface making for a crisper edge.