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View Full Version : NEW MEMBER: Newbie from Scotland saying hello



PaulH45
22-11-2017, 06:00 PM
Hi all thought I'd drop by and say hello to you all, glad I found this forum looking to build my own cnc machine with the help of all of the experts on here, don't know where to begin really :stupid::stupid:

Neale
22-11-2017, 10:07 PM
Welcome on board.

First thing to do is work out what you actually want! Be honest with yourself. So, what do you want to cut? There's a big difference between a machine that's fairly happy in wood but marginal for aluminium, fast and accurate in wood and can handle aluminium fairly well, and something that can take heavy cuts in aluminium and also tackle steel. The first is a CNC router that's fairly easy to build. The second is a router that takes more care in design and build and probably uses heavier materials and bought-in components. The third is a CNC mill and out of scope for a first home build. Not that it's not possible, just that it's a very different proposition. Then comes size. A desktop machine (up to, say, 600x300) is more straightforward than a machine that could take a quarter-sheet of the usual materials (1500x700, say). A full sheet (2240x1220) is, again, a different proposition and not just a scaled-up version of a smaller machine. So, decide what you would like, read up some of the build logs for machines with similar capacities, and think seriously about whether you want to go down that route or something different. Then start sketching ideas and come back with your outlines and ask for comments. Many of us on this forum have designed and built our own machines, and are happy to help others do the same. You'll get your leg pulled, you'll be told sometimes in no uncertain terms that you should go back to the drawing board, but it's all done with the aim of you building a machine that you can live with.

Don't make any purchases until you are confident that you are doing the right thing, and most of all, don't worry about the electrics and that kind of stuff until you are further down the line - too many people waste money with early and misjudged purchases in that area.

And have fun - it's very satisfying to end up with a finished item in your hand and be able to say, not only did I make it, but I built the machine that made it!

Clive S
22-11-2017, 11:09 PM
Hi all thought I'd drop by and say hello to you all, glad I found this forum looking to build my own cnc machine with the help of all of the experts on here, don't know where to begin really :stupid::stupid:Hi Paul and welcome to the forum. We are all here to try and help as best we can. Read what Neale has said and then read it again its good sense.

When you are ready, start a build log to keep all the questions in one place that makes it easier for everyone to keep on track. Good luck with the build.

needleworks
23-11-2017, 08:31 PM
Welcome Paul, whereabouts in Scotland are you ? I'm south Scotland

PaulH45
25-11-2017, 11:53 PM
Welcome Paul, whereabouts in Scotland are you ? I'm south Scotland

Hi needleworks I stay just outside Airdrie in the central belt

PaulH45
25-11-2017, 11:58 PM
Welcome on board.

First thing to do is work out what you actually want! Be honest with yourself. So, what do you want to cut? There's a big difference between a machine that's fairly happy in wood but marginal for aluminium, fast and accurate in wood and can handle aluminium fairly well, and something that can take heavy cuts in aluminium and also tackle steel. The first is a CNC router that's fairly easy to build. The second is a router that takes more care in design and build and probably uses heavier materials and bought-in components. The third is a CNC mill and out of scope for a first home build. Not that it's not possible, just that it's a very different proposition. Then comes size. A desktop machine (up to, say, 600x300) is more straightforward than a machine that could take a quarter-sheet of the usual materials (1500x700, say). A full sheet (2240x1220) is, again, a different proposition and not just a scaled-up version of a smaller machine. So, decide what you would like, read up some of the build logs for machines with similar capacities, and think seriously about whether you want to go down that route or something different. Then start sketching ideas and come back with your outlines and ask for comments. Many of us on this forum have designed and built our own machines, and are happy to help others do the same. You'll get your leg pulled, you'll be told sometimes in no uncertain terms that you should go back to the drawing board, but it's all done with the aim of you building a machine that you can live with.

Don't make any purchases until you are confident that you are doing the right thing, and most of all, don't worry about the electrics and that kind of stuff until you are further down the line - too many people waste money with early and misjudged purchases in that area.

And have fun - it's very satisfying to end up with a finished item in your hand and be able to say, not only did I make it, but I built the machine that made it!

Thanks for the useful info, is there anyone on here that would make one for me, looking at just small project on wood and plexiglass and maybe aluminium, don’t think I would manage to design one nor source good reliable parts to build it

mekanik
26-11-2017, 09:36 AM
Hi Paul
Welcome to the forum.
The thought of actually building can seem daunting.
If you post in the FREELANCE JOBS AND REQUESTS section, someone might might be able to help.
Kindest Regards
Mike

PaulH45
26-11-2017, 12:32 PM
thanks for the welcome mekanik, will have a look