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Telly
18-02-2011, 07:12 PM
I have a ebay TB6560 driver board. I would like some help on matching some nice small motors to the board. Any ideas?

Thanks Telly

h4ppy-chris
19-02-2011, 06:01 PM
what amp board did you get?

wiatroda
19-02-2011, 06:03 PM
3 axis tb6560 was a starting board in my CNC adventure. I connected with it SY60STH88-3008BF steppers from zapp. It was running fine until for some unknown reason blew chips (under radiator). After difficulties with obtaining replacement chips I replaced it with 3x pm752 drivers. works fine since then

Telly
20-02-2011, 06:21 PM
what amp board did you get?

3.5 amp version.

Thanks!

Jonathan
20-02-2011, 07:20 PM
3.5 amp version.

All TB6560 boards are 3.5 amp, but in reality that's pushing it - as is running on 36v. This means you need a low inductance motor to get reasonable speed.

h4ppy-chris
21-02-2011, 09:21 AM
jonathan i asked because you can get 2.5 amp.


All TB6560 boards are 3.5 amp, but in reality that's pushing it - as is running on 36v. This means you need a low inductance motor to get reasonable speed.

h4ppy-chris
21-02-2011, 09:24 AM
i use (NEMA 23 263Oz-in Stepper Motor 2Phase 2.8A 1.8Deg 4Wire) put that in to ebay Telly.


3.5 amp version.

Thanks!

Jonathan
21-02-2011, 01:08 PM
jonathan i asked because you can get 2.5 amp.

Fair enough, I didn't realise that there are two versions of the TB6560 IC. It looks like the majority are 3.5A.

Telly
21-02-2011, 07:52 PM
i use (NEMA 23 263Oz-in Stepper Motor 2Phase 2.8A 1.8Deg 4Wire) put that in to ebay Telly.

Great info. Can you tell me what type screw you use, and the max rapid you get too.

Am I mainly looking for a low inductance motor too?

Thank you.

Jonathan
21-02-2011, 08:15 PM
Am I mainly looking for a low inductance motor too?

Yep, in short the lower the inductance the lower the voltage you need to achieve a given speed/torque.

An equivalent circuit for the motor in an ideal inductor and resistor in series. If you increase the voltage the rate of change of current increases, since v(t)=iR+Ldi(t)/dt. This means in a given time the current can reach a higher peak, giving rise to more torque.

Since the voltage of your driver is limited you need to lower the inductance.

Telly
22-02-2011, 05:29 PM
Talking about inductance i'm thinking:

http://www.goodluckbuy.com/nema-23-stepper-motor-5-5kgcm-1-8degre-4leads-41mm-57bygh41-401a.html

Its only a PCB mill btw.

Thanks