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Chris J
23-04-2012, 01:17 PM
Hi guys and gals

I'm Chris from Norfolk.
I newbie who doesn't know much, but don't let that stop you taking the mickey.
Anyway more from me later.

mocha
23-04-2012, 03:52 PM
Hi Chris from Norfolk!

Consider yourself welcomed. :-) There's all levels of expertise here and there's no such thing as a stupid question!

:-)

russell
23-04-2012, 03:55 PM
there's no such thing as a stupid question!

The only stupid question is the one you don't ask :-)

Russell

Chris J
24-04-2012, 05:16 PM
The only stupid question is the one you don't ask :-)

Russell

Ok Russell
I'll test you out :-)
What is the difference between a CNC Milling Machine and a CNC Routing Machine ?

mocha
24-04-2012, 05:55 PM
Taking away the CNC element, it might depend on what era you were from? It could be argued that size of the machine, materials or dimensional capabilities denote the difference? Even the method of holding onto the tool or workpiece? But now there's more overlap between them almost every day. 2d, 2.5d. 3d? There's probably exceptions to all those.

Traditional milling machine would be bigger and heavier, certainly used for metals, exclusively hard metals in the machine shops I was in as a lad. (at tea break, you could start reading the paper but you couldn't sit down until the bell went! all dressed in white lab coats too. LOL)

Historically routers were for wood but now you have small milling machines and large routers... both capable of machining many materials...

I'm sure there are other definitions too, depends where you are coming from what facet you see.

russell
24-04-2012, 06:17 PM
Another difference is that a in a router the cutter makes all moves while in a mill the work is moved, principally in the horizontal plane. There are of course many exceptions. Spindle speeds are usually higher in the router.

Russell.

Chris J
24-04-2012, 07:06 PM
Another difference is that a in a router the cutter makes all moves while in a mill the work is moved, principally in the horizontal plane. There are of course many exceptions. Spindle speeds are usually higher in the router.

Russell.

Dooh, of course !!

mocha
24-04-2012, 07:30 PM
Another difference is that a in a router the cutter makes all moves while in a mill the work is moved, principally in the horizontal plane. There are of course many exceptions. Spindle speeds are usually higher in the router.

Russell.

Of course! I'm working on my new router design that has a fixed gantry and moving bed so forgot about that one completely!

Russell, OT slightly, but would it be fair to say that spindle speed (used) would be determined by the material being worked?

Chris J
24-04-2012, 07:55 PM
Of course! I'm working on my new router design that has a fixed gantry and moving bed so forgot about that one completely!

Russell, OT slightly, but would it be fair to say that spindle speed (used) would be determined by the material being worked?

I did used to own a mill before I sold all my gear when I moved to the USA thinking I wasn't coming back.

So my limited experience with that would say it does matter.

russell
25-04-2012, 10:19 AM
Of course! I'm working on my new router design that has a fixed gantry and moving bed so forgot about that one completely!
Yes, that blurs the distinction even more.


Russell, OT slightly, but would it be fair to say that spindle speed (used) would be determined by the material being worked?
Of course. In general the materials routers are used for are softer than those mills are used for. Note, I did say in general:-)

Russell.

John S
25-04-2012, 10:30 AM
Milling machines are used by engineers.
Routers are used by wood butchers.

No exceptions. :barbershop_quartet_

Jonathan
25-04-2012, 10:44 AM
Milling machines are used by engineers.
Routers are used by wood butchers.

What if you have both ...