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blackbirds
30-09-2012, 05:43 PM
hi guys and gals

my name is moray i am from edinburgh and i am looking to build a cnc router that is made from wood i have been looking at a lot of info over the last 6 months and i am not sure it has helped much i feel quite bewildered by all the conflicting info i have read/seen.

i am wanting a bed size of 500mm x 1000mm

i would like it to be acurate but fairly quick aswell.

as with other self builders the reason i want to build it is down to cost although i dont want to compromise on quality.

i am looking for other cnc enthusiasts and users near to me but i also value any help from anyone of you reading this post.

i look forward to hearing from you all and ever scrap of help is valued.

Jonathan
30-09-2012, 05:47 PM
Machines made out of wood to cut wood do work, but making the machine out of wood tends towards compromising speed (material removal rate strictly speaking) and accuracy.
It's hard to give a more specific answer without knowing what materials you need to cut?

blackbirds
30-09-2012, 05:49 PM
il be cutting mdf ply and pine i dont think i will be doing hard wood but you never know

blackbirds
30-09-2012, 07:23 PM
this is posted else where on this forum but i think it should be here.

hi guys and gals

my name is moray i am from edinburgh and i am looking to build a cnc router that is made from wood i have been looking at a lot of info over the last 6 months and i am not sure it has helped much i feel quite bewildered by all the conflicting info i have read/seen.

i am wanting a bed size of 500mm x 1000mm

i would like it to be acurate but fairly quick aswell.

as with other self builders the reason i want to build it is down to cost although i dont want to compromise on quality.

i am looking for other cnc enthusiasts and users near to me but i also value any help from anyone of you reading this post.

i look forward to hearing from you all and ever scrap of help is valued.



few point i am building this to cut mdf pine and other soft wood but the option to cut hardwood may be needed in the future

JAZZCNC
01-10-2012, 12:56 AM
Hi Blackbird,

You have a potential conflict happening here.?

Your goals or desires for Accurate, quick and no compromising yet still be cost affective conflict with building with wood.?
Wood can be used but to do it and meet all your goals then it's not an easy route and not always cheaper.!

The work involved will be far more than if you used Steel or Aluminium and won't come near in strength if made from wood without some time consuming torsion box type arrangements mixed with a very good design. . . . Not a material I'd recommend for first time machine if you realisticly expect to meet all your goals.!!

The time saving of building can pay for any extra cost steel or Aluminium cost because the machine will be earning sooner. Then you have the reliability factor because the stronger machine won't need any where near has much upkeep so down time will be minimal.!!

Wood/MDF builds are ok to get your feet wet but ultimately if you plan using the machine for making money doing lengthy working hours then they leave something to be desired unless very well built and even then in a very specific way to a good design.!!

Good luck.!

martin54
01-10-2012, 01:11 AM
Welcome to the forum Blackbirds, new here myself but I have already learnt that there are at least 2 other people on the forum in the Edinburgh area. Michael is one of them but you will know that as he answered one of your posts, if your looking to use this machine to make money then it would probably be a good idea to at least see what sort of changes & extra cost would be involved in cutting hard woods, you may think that part of your plan is still far away but once you get up & running it may well come round much sooner than you think.

Probably also be best to be a bit more specific about what sort of help you need right now as well. Do you already have a design or an idea of a design you would like to use.

JAZZCNC
01-10-2012, 01:16 AM
Machines made out of wood to cut wood do work, but making the machine out of wood tends towards compromising speed (material removal rate strictly speaking) and accuracy.
It's hard to give a more specific answer without knowing what materials you need to cut?

Jonathan there seems to be 2 threads about same thing can you do your MOD stuff and combine into one.?

Jonathan
01-10-2012, 01:40 AM
You're not cutting anything particularly demanding (e.g. aluminium/hard plastics) so a wooden machine could be made to work, but that's the point - just work, not excel. If the machine is made from steel and aluminium, the higher rigidity obtained will enable you to cut much faster without compromising finish or accuracy, which is likely to be important if you're starting a business where you want to be concentrating on what you're making, not what you're using to make it.


Jonathan there seems to be 2 threads about same thing can you do your MOD stuff and combine into one.?

Done it.

Blackbirds - you may wish to start a build log in this section (http://www.mycncuk.com/forums/router-build-logs/) before this thread gets too in depth. Perhaps when you have done an initial concept drawing would be a good time.

blackbirds
01-10-2012, 01:58 AM
ok guys thanks i think i may need to go back to the drawing board as i am a total noob and dont know where to start the main reason i was choosing wood is because its a material im good with (not built much out of metal) so any advice or pointers are great

jonathan if you want i can start a building log now if thats what is best

Jonathan
01-10-2012, 02:08 AM
ok guys thanks i think i may need to go back to the drawing board as i am a total noob and dont know where to start the main reason i was choosing wood is because its a material im good with (not built much out of metal) so any advice or pointers are great

The top 10 'Hottest threads', which are highlighted on the homepage, are almost all build logs. If you read all, or even just a couple of those you'll know the vast majority of what's required since the same things repeatedly crop up.


jonathan if you want i can start a building log now if thats what is best

Up to you...

JAZZCNC
01-10-2012, 03:59 PM
jonathan if you want i can start a building log now if thats what is best

Personally I wouldn't start a build log until you have looked around and settled on a design that you feel will meet your needs and done plenty of research being completely honest with your self regards your skills and ability's.? . . . Starting a build log before design is settled doesn't always help and infact can confuse or cloud the mind even more than when researching.

Too many variables to building a DIY cnc machine and others will always have there own opinions of what's best or better and if your undecided on the design then before you know it's changed beyond all recognition and not always for the better.? . . . Often wasting money because you have started going in a particular direction only to be side tracked by someone more experienced like Jonathan or ME spotting potential errors or others who arn't experienced just tossing in curved balls, not particularly with any malice but there and confusing all the same.!!

Much better route is to view other builds, find design you like (Preferably one doing a similar job to what you intend) and feel could achieve given your ability's or resources etc.
Ask the builder questions directly regards any flaws or improvements, you'll find 99% of machines can be improved.
Take the time to break down and find out how the components which make up the machine work individually and together, if you don't understand then post individual questions asking about each untill you do.!! . . . . We will never laugh or think that's a DUM question.? 99.99999% guarantee they've been asked already or I've thought them already.!!

Then start a build log with DESIGN & COMPONENT SPECS first put up for review so it can be checked out.!!!!. . . and here's the MOST IMPORTANT BIT.!! ### BEFORE### you buy a single Piece or part to build it.!!
Hopefully if you do the above there will be very little wrong has you'll have found a good design and researched and more importantly understand what's required.! . . The only thing left to do will be build the bloody thing which will go sweet because you'll know exactly the route your going down and what it's being made from.!!. . . . Simplizzzz

martin54
01-10-2012, 05:43 PM
Jazz some good advice there, something like that as a sticky would probably help a lot of people who are new to all this (would have helped me).
Think you also need to look at what tooling is available to you as well as what skills & ability's you have because this can be a factor as well, I went down the wooden machine road basically because it was cheap & because I had all the tools required to manufacture the machine already, maybe not the right way to approach it but if you are new & don't know any better what can you do.

Sorry blackbirds not trying to hijack your thread but being new to all this as well I am learning all the time to.

WandrinAndy
01-10-2012, 07:49 PM
... Take the time to break down and find out how the components which make up the machine work individually and together....

Shortly before sparrow fart this morning... forgot to go to bed/sleep... I stumbled upon a series of YouTube videos that I am so far finding pretty good. The series is titled "Homemade DIY CNC Series" and is by "radioshack7" and Episode 1 is at this link Homemade DIY CNC Series - Intro to Linear Rails - Neo7CNC.com - Episode 1 - YouTube (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aGZC1OWVYU4&feature=relmfu)