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View Full Version : How many LinuxCNC/EMC users do we have?



birchy
29-12-2012, 08:07 PM
I'm part-way through a Warco WM16 mill CNC conversion and just starting out with EMC 2.4. I've used Linux on all my home computers for a number of years and do some programming in Python on a different project. Truth be told, I'm a geek and not scared to admit it. :joyous:

Sooo, I was just wondering how many of you are using LinuxCNC/EMC on your CNC machines? I don't want to start a Windows vs Linux debate, so please don't post if you're only going to tell us how fantastic Mach is.

D.C.
29-12-2012, 08:36 PM
I plan to use linuxcnc/EMC. EMC was designed as industrial class machine control software, just like apache is an industrial class webserver, if you have already gotten over the screaming hysterics of IT'S NOT WINDOWS, I'M SCARED!!! Why not use great free software that you are free to hack the crap out of if you want to?

PS, just incase a windows VS *nix debate does start, please take a look here and choose operating system family from the category option.

List Statistics | TOP500 Supercomputer Sites (http://www.top500.org/statistics/list/)

There is a reason why windows based supercomputers are a rounding error... ;)

Swarfing
29-12-2012, 11:53 PM
Oh! i'm sorry i did not know there was any other way of using computers other than linux???? I thought Windows were for looking through....thats right just a great big marketing scam.

Swarfing
29-12-2012, 11:58 PM
Inventor of the kernel...Mmmmmm thats right UNIX. Don't get me started here for gods sake.


I will now get off my soap box. Every system has it's place, it's just a case of how much you can spend on marketing that makes it great in the eyes of the beholder. Like the bible there once was a computer, and like the deciples a rouge one went in another direction ripping off his friends :-)

i2i
30-12-2012, 12:06 AM
that's three then, watch out Bill.

Swarfing
30-12-2012, 12:14 AM
lol

Careful we will take over the world

Jonathan
30-12-2012, 12:24 AM
Make that 4...

I've used Mach3 and LinuxCNC extensively, so to anyone who asks me which I should use I just point out the major advantages/disadvantages then say try both and see which you get on with the best, as in the end that's what matters.


Careful we will take over the world

No no, that's next year.

D.C.
30-12-2012, 12:33 AM
No no, that's next year.

That is what Linus said, before he got distracted moaning about KDE 4....

i2i
30-12-2012, 02:17 AM
lol

Careful we will take over the worldi've been so tempted to try it, it's just the time that's needed to learn a new system

Swarfing
30-12-2012, 09:41 AM
Whats there to learn? I've done all my stuff on Linux since day one. Just set up dedicated machine. Most thinks are the same you just do it a different way :hysterical:

To free yourself have dual boot machine, slowly install software that you like and eventually you won't boot to windows.....easy.

i2i
30-12-2012, 11:13 AM
the os and emc. I will try it but it 's not top priority atm.

birchy
30-12-2012, 01:40 PM
You don't have to install it to try it. Most Linux installation CD/DVD will have a "live" option which is basically a complete OS that runs in RAM without making any changes to your hard disk. If you like it, you can then install it. If you don't, then you can throw the disk away and carry on using Windows. Simples.

HankMcSpank
30-12-2012, 02:07 PM
Windows user here (I don't use Mach3 but way prefer CNC-USB)

Frankly, I don't care what my operating system is (& I find all the related arguments a bore ....I start self harming after the few argumentative posts are unfurled).

The decision for me was an easy one...... I already know how to drive windows, it seemed a tad excessive to go & learn a new OS just so I can use a CNC app!

Jonathan
30-12-2012, 03:23 PM
I already know how to drive windows, it seemed a tad excessive to go & learn a new OS just so I can use a CNC app!

That's the point most people seem to miss - you don't need to learn a new OS to use LinuxCNC. If you can work out how to double click an icon on the desktop, and shut the computer down then you've mastered all you need to run LinuxCNC. Once loaded LinuxCNC, and ubuntu really, on the surface look like many other programs on windows so it's no more difficult than working out how to use a new program on windows.

birchy
30-12-2012, 03:30 PM
TBH, I don't understand the "learning a new OS" comments as the learning curve is actually very shallow. There's not a great difference between the user friendliness of Windows and Linux. In fact, I might be inclined to argue that Linux is MORE user friendly...but I won't because I didn't start this thread to create yet another Windows vs Linux argument. It's best to pick the tool and expenditure you are most comfortable with, no matter what the OS is.


EDIT: Jonathon wasn't drinking tea and scoffing biscuits while typing and thinking about how the world works...

HankMcSpank
30-12-2012, 05:11 PM
TBH, I don't understand the "learning a new OS" comments as the learning curve is actually very shallow. There's not a great difference between the user friendliness of Windows and Linux. In fact, I might be inclined to argue that Linux is MORE user friendly...but I won't because I didn't start this thread to create yet another Windows vs Linux argument. It's best to pick the tool and expenditure you are most comfortable with, no matter what the OS is


It's not just learning the new OS (& however shallow the learning curve is...it's still a learning curve, getting the OS installed, configuring the drivers, installing apps ....then getting a handle on the new OS interface)), it's that WTF moment when something doesn't quite work as expected ....i.e. is it the OS ...is it the app?

With windows, at least I know how to troubleshoot....not saying I couldn't with Linux etc....but like I say, why go to all the bother for one CNC app when I already know one OS well (& there are CNC apps a plenty for windows)

birchy
30-12-2012, 07:08 PM
configuring the drivers, installing appsYou don't need to do that. The installer will automatically select the best drivers and settings for your hardware. All the apps you need should be pre-installed but even if they aren't, you simply start the software manager, search for whatever you want and click install. It will download and install any app automatically from the "repository" of 30K+ apps. The Apple "app store" and Androids "app market" are both ideas stolen from Linux, except they decided to make some money out if it.

Try a LiveCD and see what you think. Linux is not as scary as you might think...