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Tabclear
27-02-2013, 10:47 PM
Hi all,

I'm new here.... Please forgive the asking for help so immediately...

I have a CAD object that is around 17x27x5 mm in size, it has fairly detailed embossing, a few holes between 3 and 4 mm, and some general cut outs.

I have contacted numerous CNC machinists in the hope of getting this thing made out of wood, however every last one of them have said its too small for their machines.

I think I may be lacking the terminology to properly Google search for someone to create this for me, can anyone here help?

I am hoping to mass produce this little object in wood, but at this stage I am thinking that it may just not be possible.

All help appreciated.

Thanks
Tab

Web Goblin
28-02-2013, 05:55 AM
Post a photo or drawing of what you need so everyone can see it and decide if they can make it for you.

Tabclear
28-02-2013, 09:42 AM
Post a photo or drawing of what you need so everyone can see it and decide if they can make it for you.

Render attached...

8299

phill05
28-02-2013, 10:53 AM
What type of wood are you thinking to use on such a small part with this amount of detail

Phill

Robin Hewitt
28-02-2013, 11:56 AM
Does it have to be wood? It would be a doddle to print.

You could fume it to get a better finish:- Giving 3D printed parts a shiny smooth finish (http://hackaday.com/2013/02/26/giving-3d-printed-parts-a-shiny-smooth-finish/#more-95176)

Tabclear
28-02-2013, 03:27 PM
What type of wood are you thinking to use on such a small part with this amount of detail

Phill

I would like to use acrylic pressure stabilised hard wood. Maple seems to be easiest to get hold of, but any really.



Does it have to be wood? It would be a doddle to print.

I have had it printed for prototype purposes, but I would like the finished piece to be in wood.

Cheers
Tab

JAZZCNC
28-02-2013, 05:27 PM
I think you'll find these will be too expensive to produce. Thou small parts they need to be machined on 3 sides which means setting machine 3 times ensuring accurate relocation.
Also 2 operations are full 3D which takes long time for just a few parts and to do properly in larger volumes will require a special Jig to be made. Again timely and expensive to make, esp if lots are to be made in one go.

How about a mould and using resin.?

Tabclear
28-02-2013, 05:45 PM
I think you'll find these will be too expensive to produce. Thou small parts they need to be machined on 3 sides which means setting machine 3 times ensuring accurate relocation.
Also 2 operations are full 3D which takes long time for just a few parts and to do properly in larger volumes will require a special Jig to be made. Again timely and expensive to make, esp if lots are to be made in one go.

How about a mould and using resin.?

You sound like you know what you are talking about, so I guess I will have to shelve my dream of having this produced in wood. What would be involved in using a mould and resin? What sort of finish would I get and how would it look colour wise etc...? Is there any chance I could get a wood effect?

Thanks
Tab

GEOFFREY
28-02-2013, 06:03 PM
I cast some floor panels in resin and then paint them. Most people think they are wood. If you make a wood master and and wire brush it to exagerate the grain, the grain effect should come out in the mould. Despite the small size the mould is likely to be a bit expensive as it will not be an easy one to make. G.

JAZZCNC
28-02-2013, 06:32 PM
Yes regards the machining I know little what talking about but unfortunately know far less about the resin casting side.

I would have thought that Silicone mould would be the best option to give most detail. Make a high quality Master and Like Geoff says exaggerate grain affect thru wire brushing or sand blasting and with a bit of playing around colouring the resin then would have thought should get a good wood affect.?

Musht
28-02-2013, 11:21 PM
Can get resin to mimic most finishes, think of stone chessmen :-) , wood is similar idea, base colour and darker colour rubbed into the crevices

Casting Related Topics | Achieving a Woodgrain Finish Effect | Mold Making and Casting Materials Rubber, Plastic, Lifecasting, and More (http://www.smooth-on.com/Casting-Related-Topics/c12/p57/Achieving-a-Woodgrain-Finish-Effect/pages.html)

Tabclear
01-03-2013, 09:17 AM
Can get resin to mimic most finishes, think of stone chessmen :-) , wood is similar idea, base colour and darker colour rubbed into the crevices

Casting Related Topics | Achieving a Woodgrain Finish Effect | Mold Making and Casting Materials Rubber, Plastic, Lifecasting, and More (http://www.smooth-on.com/Casting-Related-Topics/c12/p57/Achieving-a-Woodgrain-Finish-Effect/pages.html)

OK I am liking this this mold idea.. Although I am not sure how to mold a complete 3D model, when every side has detail? My object isn't like a chess piece or statue that has a nice flat bottom...

Also my object is going to form part of some jewellery, how suitable is resin for this? I would hate after a year or so for it to start to lose it's shine, colour or detail..?

Thanks for the advice so far guys..

Tab

Philly
01-03-2013, 02:46 PM
You'd probably get away with a 2 part silicon mold by having the divide line between top and bottom

Tabclear
01-03-2013, 04:01 PM
OK I have just watched about a dozen 2-part mold videos, and unfortunately the results are not looking good for my little project. The seam is extremely noticeable, plus the hole I am going to have to make somewhere so I can pour in the resin is going to be very noticeable. I think sanding will only do so much because of the embossing detail on my object. From what I can tell, sanding also seems to alter the colour of where you are sanding, which I suppose is fine if you are painting the part, but I won't be painting it.

I am not sure a mold is the way to go now. Are there any other options I am not considering?

Philly
01-03-2013, 04:14 PM
The seam can be practically invisible if done correctly. You could also slush cast it(makes a hollow piece but saves a lot of resin). Any reason you wont be painting it?

Tabclear
01-03-2013, 04:27 PM
I am not sure hollow will work, it needs to be quite solid, plus has 3 quite deep holes in it.

The part forms part of some jewellery, the original reason for wanting it to be made of wood was longevity and resilience. It going to be knocked, rubbed, twisted, scrapped - I don't want paint to be scrapping off, fading chipping etc... It really needs to last a lifetime of being worn by someone.

GEOFFREY
01-03-2013, 04:35 PM
I am not sure hollow will work, it needs to be quite solid, plus has 3 quite deep holes in it.

The part forms part of some jewellery, the original reason for wanting it to be made of wood was longevity and resilience. It going to be knocked, rubbed, twisted, scrapped - I don't want paint to be scrapping off, fading chipping etc... It really needs to last a lifetime of being worn by someone.


Then I would guess the best answer is to stick with your original idea.There are few people that could do it, but it will be expensive - look at Jazz's comments.G.

Tabclear
01-03-2013, 04:46 PM
Then I would guess the best answer is to stick with your original idea.There are few people that could do it, but it will be expensive - look at Jazz's comments.G.

Yeah I think you are right. I guess the initial cost to get things set up to make the first one could be quite high, but maybe the cost would go down for each subsequent one after that? I'm just guessing..

Could anyone here give me a rough estimate?... Would be great if someone was in the Hertfordshire area so I could pop along and maybe help out - moral support mostly I would guess :-)

Failing the above, can someone recommend a desktop CNC machine that I might purchase to do this myself?

Cheers
Tab