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Ross77
02-04-2013, 01:50 AM
So after a long time away from anything hobby related I have finally got around to some shed time.

having learned from my drill conversion saga I hopefully have done it properly now and just bought a descent mill to convert to cnc. It is actually an EME mentor mill MM1 base with a Maximat7 mill head. 4 speed gear box and 0.25kW 415V 3 phase motor.

8624

The main problem is that the motor is 415v and the plastic gears in the gearbox are shot. In light of this I think the best option is use a DC motor from a treadmill and convert it to belt drive giving full speed control and 2hp.

The existing motor is part of the top plate and also holds the bearing for the final drive cog. To fit a different motor would mean making a new plate. Not having a working mill does pose the problem of how to make this.

8632

Any takers for quoting to make this part? subjec to proper dims and drawings etc.

Cheers

Swarfing
02-04-2013, 11:04 AM
Ross

I'm rebuilding the head off my Arboga at the moment where the gearbox sits on top. i had to dump this to build a direct drive. I would just mount the mount up off the top plate you have already and remove all the gubbins from your box. This way you would just need a couple of pieces of Bar to raise the motor in the air to accommodate the pulleys.

John S
02-04-2013, 11:13 AM
Same as Ross.
Saw the top plate off the motor, job done and everything fits and is in line.

Ross77
02-04-2013, 07:51 PM
Thanks Swarfing and John. I always seem to miss the easy solutions, although I was hoping to make all mods reversible. Didnt want to hack up something that I might be able to sell. Are 415v motors for these machines worth anything?

I'll have another look and see if the end plate will come off without destroying the motor, that would be the best out come.

Thanks again

Swarfing
02-04-2013, 08:19 PM
If it wires 230 - 240v delta then just wack a vfd on it and away you go :-)

Ross77
02-04-2013, 08:47 PM
If it wires 230 - 240v delta then just wack a vfd on it and away you go :-)

How can I tell? motor plate says 440v and there isnt the normal terminal box for changing star or dlta configurations. will a 440v motor run on 240v not be half as slow?

Cheers

Lee Roberts
02-04-2013, 09:15 PM
Nice to see you back Ross, was reading some of your threads the other day and said to myself "i wonder what hes upto these days".

.Me

Swarfing
02-04-2013, 10:50 PM
If there is no obvious opening or cap to reconfigure then maybe not? google mot or details and see what comes up.

Ross77
02-04-2013, 10:53 PM
Thanks Lee, good to be back. Been converting a barn for the last 3 years and still not quite finished but need some down time to try and keep me sane.

Progress will be slow but I have a lot planned for this mill, essentially it will be full cnc but with a Arduino (or similar micro processor) to monitor speed, axis DRO and act as a standalone controller for quick manual use.

GEOFFREY
02-04-2013, 10:55 PM
I think you probably can still reconfigure it , but you will need to find the star point on the windings and the rewire as delta. G.

m_c
03-04-2013, 12:15 AM
Whether the motor can be altered to run on 240V depends on if it's wired as Star or Delta 440V.

It's a case of carefully dismantling the motor, and seeing where and how the coils are connected. If all the coil wires ultimately end up with 3 going to the power feed, and 3 joined together in at one point, it can be changed to run on 240V. However, if each of the three going in split to two, then it's already in delta and can't be changed.

GEOFFREY
03-04-2013, 12:40 AM
Absolutely correct m_c, I assumed the motor is probably wired as star which is why I said it can "probably" be reconfigured to delta. If it is already delta then there is no "simple" solution. G.

Ross77
03-04-2013, 12:47 AM
Thanks I was going to ask Geoffrey to elaborate but it think thats clear enough now. I'll have to check but I think the motor plate has a triangle on it so already delta. I've found a bit more info and it looks like the wiring is all done in the base. I'll have a proper look tomorrow.

A bit more research has also highlighted the weakness of the plastic gears so even if I can find replacements then it looks like a maintainance problem. belt drive might be worth the work.

Thanks for the info. good to know all the options

m_c
04-04-2013, 12:42 AM
Absolutely correct m_c, I assumed the motor is probably wired as star which is why I said it can "probably" be reconfigured to delta. If it is already delta then there is no "simple" solution. G.

From my experience, if a motor is 240V capable it will be written/stamped on the plate as being capable of dual voltage. However if it's wound for 415V in delta, it will most likely be marked as 415V only.
However, until you dismantle it and check how the external wiring links to the coil wires, you can only make a guess.

There are a couple options to avoid a motor swap. If you can live with reduced torque at higher speeds, you can run the motor via an inverter on 240V. HowTo: 240V Supply to a 400V AC Motor - Application Detail (http://www.inverterdrive.com/HowTo/240V-Supply-to-a-400V-AC-Motor/) explains it well.

Or you can get inverters that will step up 240 to 415V - DIGITAL 240 TO 415 INVERTERS | Drives Direct Inverters LTD (http://www.invertersdirect.co.uk/Category/39f33e29-1565-4074-a5f4-142bc432f4e9/DIGITAL-240-TO-415-INVERTERS)

GEOFFREY
04-04-2013, 01:57 AM
As a general rule I think the motors (usually older motors) wired internally were not intended to be run on 240V. Ihave been running 3ph motors on single phase for years as the 3ph machines are cheaper to buy s/hand due to lack of diy 3ph availablity.
I have also never used a proprietry inverter due to cost considerations, but have sacrificed some torque and used capacitors to give "quasi" 3ph. Whilst this may be frowned upon I have found this to be a good solution on motors up to 3HP. As Ross has decided to use a different motor this is academic, but I mention it in case someone else wants to run a 3ph motor on single phase, provided of course the motor is configured as 240v delta. G.

Ross77
04-04-2013, 02:07 AM
Ok had another look tonight and the plate says 440 star, so might be in luck, bought some smaller gear pullers and got the motor apart without damaging it. Only 3 wires + earth go in to the motor there looks to be more wires joined and pushed down into the casing. not brave enough to dig them out yet, think I had better find a diagram for which wires are which coil.

if it was possible to convert to 240v what size inverter would I need? rated 0.25kW@ 440v so 0.125kW@ 240v? I have an inverter that I bought for the lathe but Its 1.5kW so might fry the small motor.

thanks for the 240>440 info but I think that if the motor cant be rewired to run on 240 then I will do the DC motor swap which looks a bit easier now I know I can use the existing top plate.
Cheers

m_c
04-04-2013, 01:24 PM
If it is star, then the first thing you need to do is find the star point. *runs of to find image*

A quick google gave me the lower of the two images on this page - Star Delta Start Up Principles (http://www.wikiplc.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=42&Itemid=34)
(ignore the writing/figures, as it's explaining something you really don't need to worry about!)

as you should be able to see, the lefthand is Star configuration. What you need to do, is split the star point, then reconnect the coils in Delta (right hand image), and apply the power inputs to the delta points.
The motor will still be 0.25kw, however it will now require almost twice as much current, which should be around 1-1.2A of the top of my head. You can use a bigger inverter, however you'll need to alter the current limit settings to ensure it limits the amount of current should the motor get overloaded for any reason.

Ross77
04-04-2013, 07:30 PM
I have also never used a proprietry inverter due to cost considerations, but have sacrificed some torque and used capacitors to give "quasi" 3ph. Whilst this may be frowned upon I have found this to be a good solution on motors up to 3HP

As long as its safe and it works for what ever application its in then I dont think it matters, I read that some of the Emco lathes and mills are configured like this from the manufacture.

Thanks Mc, worth a try.

Ross77
05-04-2013, 01:24 AM
sorry for the short reply, had to go out sooner than I thought. thanks for getting star - delta spec I was hoping to get the wire colours for each coil but the best I can find from emco is brown, blue, black, to the motor. looks like I'm going to have to find them buy trial and error, or testing. as a starting point Ill draw up the existing arrangement and get back back to you if that's ok?

Thanks again for your help. if there is a way to get this working on 240v then I'm keen to sort it out so I can test the machine before I make to many plans.........looks like some gorilla has been pounding on the draw bar with a hammer to release the collet holder and bent the top part of the spindle. arrgg:sorrow:

GEOFFREY
05-04-2013, 11:08 AM
Stick with it it Ross. I am fairly sure you will be able to run that motor on single phase with with your inverter (or capacitors!).
When you check out the wiring you should be able to find the star point fairly easily, and once the wires are separated can then just do a simple ohms check to identify the three windings. Reconfigure as delta and you will be away. Good luck. G.

m_c
05-04-2013, 12:45 PM
I'd highly doubt the coil wiring will have any sort of identification. They're usually just the enammeled copper wiring with a bit extra insulation slid over the top.

Ross77
05-04-2013, 07:10 PM
I think I have it sorted now! the motor was wired in star and has 6 coils which are interconnected in pairs. Before I cut the star connection I tested the input wires and got 100 ohms across each phase, which in star con fig is 2 coils (4 actually). When I cut the star connection and retested each coil I got continuity from the buzzer and 50 ohms reading.

The question is can I run it using a capacitor in delta configuration to test? or will it only run from the inverter and risk damaging that if I got the rewire wrong? Lastly can I use a cap from another 240v motor or is the capacitance value dependant on the motor?

Thanks again

Swarfing
05-04-2013, 07:42 PM
Thing is you will need a few caps and they will be different sizes for the phases. By the time you have messed around you might as well get an inverter (vfd). If the motor does not work out i would still use another 3 phase motor.

Ross77
05-04-2013, 07:51 PM
Ah. I thought is was 1 cap in one of the phases or is that for star config?

I was only wanting to try the cap route for initial testing after I rewired the motor as I don't want to damage the VFD. (already got one)

Is there any other way to test a 3 phase motor?

irving2008
05-04-2013, 08:32 PM
Ah. I thought is was 1 cap in one of the phases or is that for star config?

I was only wanting to try the cap route for initial testing after I rewired the motor as I don't want to damage the VFD. (already got one)

Is there any other way to test a 3 phase motor?

you wont damage the VFD*. if its a half decent one it'll have foldback current limiting and overheat protection.

*but dont blame me if you let out magic smoke :biggrin:

Ross77
05-04-2013, 10:22 PM
*but dont blame me if you let out magic smoke

Ah that old chestnut "It'll be allright but don't blame me if it goes wrong.....":smug:

I'll have to dig out the VFD and see if its 'spanner rewiring motor proof' Got to find the dam thing first, bought it a few years ago for the lathe and never managed to get a 3 phase motor for it.

Looks like a job for tomorrow night after I have finished the tilling

m_c
06-04-2013, 12:08 AM
You only effectively need 1 capacitor to run a three phase motor from a single phase, however you normally need to use a few connected in parallel to acheive the required capacitance.

Search for 'static phase convertor' if you want to know more, however you need to check the generated voltages while running to ensure the 'false' phases aren't too high/low, and the voltages will also vary depending on load.

GEOFFREY
06-04-2013, 01:02 AM
Ross, as m_c said ,you do usually only need one capacitor, connected across one leg of the delta triangle, but to get the correct capacitance you may need a couple in parallel. It is sometimes necessary to have an additional capacitor to increase the capacitance for initial starting, especially if starting under some load. this extra capacitor can be operated with a spring loaded switch, held on until the motor reaches speed (only a second or so) or as I do now using a timer circuit. G.

Swarfing
06-04-2013, 01:06 AM
If you really want to go down that route then have a read of this. It helped me get my cross feed motor going on my BP. I could not swap that out because of the frame of the motor.

phaseconverter (http://www.waterfront-woods.com/Articles/phaseconverter.htm)

GEOFFREY
06-04-2013, 01:09 AM
Exactly! G.

Ross77
06-04-2013, 11:17 PM
Thanks guys, I think I'll pass on the capacitor route then. Worth mentioning though as it might help someone else.

Out of interest what is the verdict on DC motor vs AC + vfd or is that a question for another thread
?

Swarfing
08-04-2013, 10:32 AM
It's not quite true you only need one cap? i had to use a few to get the balance right on all the phases. Takes a bit of messing but worked well in the end and saved me using a VFD for the job. Ross it is horses for courses, for me i prefer to use AC and VFD because it is easier. Brushless DC would be second choice but expensive (large servo would be even better). How deep are your pockets?

GEOFFREY
08-04-2013, 12:41 PM
Swarfing, once the correct value cap has been established, apart from the "start" cap you are still only putting "C" across one leg of the delta (or am I missing something?). To give the correct "C" value you may well decide to use a combination of caps to achieve that value, but a single item of the correct value can usually be found. If Ross already has an inverter then obviously that is the best way ahead for him. I only make this point because I would not like to be thought of as misleading anybody. G.

Swarfing
08-04-2013, 03:13 PM
G it was a long time ago when i did mine, you may be right so don't think you are misleading people. Mine would not balance across each phase so had to tweak with various caps to balance. If one phase runs out of balance then it would contribute to a short life of the motor. Bear in mind mine was 69 BP i applied this too. look at the second image up on the link i supplied earlier in this thread and you will see what i mean. That is the way i followed and it works a treat with only slight loss of torque.

GEOFFREY
08-04-2013, 03:51 PM
Yes, I think its a great way to do it for very little expense and whilst I am aware that it is "quasi" 3 phase, I have never noticed any power losses. Mind you I have never had the real thing, so I wouldn't would I? G.

Ross77
09-04-2013, 01:33 AM
It's not quite true you only need one cap? i had to use a few to get the balance right on all the phases. Takes a bit of messing but worked well in the end and saved me using a VFD for the job. Ross it is horses for courses, for me i prefer to use AC and VFD because it is easier. Brushless DC would be second choice but expensive (large servo would be even better). How deep are your pockets?

Cheers, I always thought that ac with vfd was more reliable but restrictive on high rpm also I had heard that torque at low speed can be an issue.

I was more looking at cheap treadmill motors, mainly because I picked one one up on ebay for 1. Not had chance to break it down yet but the specs say 1.75hp continuous and 3hp peak. geared down to 3000 rpm for the mill as it has roller bearings then that would be about 3hp continuous. geared up 1:2 on another spindle it should still achieve 1hp at 12000rpm :cool:

Swarfing
09-04-2013, 09:24 AM
Sounds like your most of the way there then. Just need an appropriate controller and your away :-)

Jonathan
09-04-2013, 11:24 AM
Cheers, I always thought that ac with vfd was more reliable but restrictive on high rpm also I had heard that torque at low speed can be an issue.

You can run a lot of standard induction motors at well over their rated frequency using a VFD and you will still get approximately rated power at the higher speed, however for that to happen clearly the torque drops proportionately. When you reduce the speed with a VFD, ideally the torque remains constant but in reality it drops a little. Even if the torque did remain constant, your power output will reduce with speed as power=torque*angular velocity.

The cheap VFDs from China seem to be good:
http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/VARIABLE-FREQUENCY-DRIVE-INVERTER-VFD-2-2KW-3HP-10A-t3-/261063792937?pt=UK_BOI_Industrial_Automation_Contr ol_ET&hash=item3cc89d5929

I use one of those to power the 2.2kW motor on my lathe and it works well.


the specs say 1.75hp continuous and 3hp peak. geared down to 3000 rpm for the mill as it has roller bearings then that would be about 3hp continuous. geared up 1:2 on another spindle it should still achieve 1hp at 12000rpm :cool:

Ideal gearing doesn't change the power output - if the input is 1.75hp, then whatever gearing you put in between the output will still be 1.75hp continuous, not 3hp. Clearly in reality you loose a few percent due to the inefficiency of the gearing.

Swarfing
09-04-2013, 06:59 PM
Looking at the size of the machine i think the DC motor will do you fine. Mine will be running with only 1HP motor and that is more than enough for my needs.

Ross77
09-04-2013, 07:08 PM
Thanks Jonathan, is the torque drop off noticable? or is it dependant on the motor?

With referance to the gearing I was talking about power at the tool cutting tip. obviously the motor will always be the same power. :nevreness: Or have I got that wrong as well?

edit yes I have.....increase in velocity when gearing up and increase in torque when gearing down.

Ross77
09-04-2013, 07:38 PM
Looking at the size of the machine i think the DC motor will do you fine. Mine will be running with only 1HP motor and that is more than enough for my needs.

Hi Swarfing, you posted the same time as me so missed your reply. yeah think the DC will be fine for this little mill but I was just trying to work out which would be best. Didnt what to spend time making mounts etc if the ac motor on vfd would be as good, it seems that the DC wins on low rpm to torqure ratio which is mainly what I need for this machine.

The sad thing is i need to get the ac motor working to make the bits to convert to dc, that is providing the spndle is ok.


Sounds like your most of the way there then. Just need an appropriate controller and your away :-)

I was hoping to cannibalise the motor controller from the tread mill and control it with a Adruino.

Swarfing
09-04-2013, 08:17 PM
That DC motor is it a 90v or 180v by the way?

Ross77
10-04-2013, 12:35 AM
just opened it up and the motor is 180v and 4800rpm so a little slower than I was hoping for. Driver board looks quite compact and control panel is fed from one muiti core wire so shouldn't be to difficult to hack the speed commands.

On the down side it is 10mm to big (diameter) to mount on the existing motor plate so to use that motor I will have to make a new mount and move the motor position over to clear the top of the quill. Looks like I'm going to have to have a go at rewiring the AC motor for 240v and fire up the vfd.

Swarfing
10-04-2013, 12:51 AM
Go for it, at the end of the day your other options are to spend some money. If i does not work...then just spend some money :-)

Ross77
11-04-2013, 02:06 AM
finally found time to rewire the motor and it was embarrassingly easy, don't know why I was so worried about doing it. Coils measured 50 ohms on their own so in delta config you basically have two coils in series which are also connected in parallel to the 3rd coil, so if I have it correct then that gives 100 ohm and 50 ohm in parallel which is 33.3 ohms. tested each pair of wires and always got 33.3 ohms so hopefully I have got it right.

8715
Also worked out how to set up the vfd, connected a forward/reverse switch and a speed pot. tested it on a another motor and all works fine. so hope fully tomorrow I can rebuild the motor and see if it works.

8716

Swarfing
11-04-2013, 02:11 AM
Well done Ross:encouragement:

Ross77
11-04-2013, 02:24 AM
ta, its good to get something done rather than just talking about it. :hopelessness: onwards and up wards.........you never know I might have a working mill by the weekend.:toot:

Ross77
13-04-2013, 01:02 AM
Problem 1 and 2 solved. Motor works fine on 240v with the vfd and got the gearbox fixed so all 4 speeds are working. :yahoo:

I wasnt going to bother fixing the gearbox as the vfd would have taken care of the speed control but unfortunately though the 1 speed that worked was the slowest (350rpm ish). The previous owner had some replacement gears made but they didn't quite match the gear profile so I had to file them down, not ideal but needs must and at least I can test the rest of the machine.

A BIG THANK YOU to all that have help sort his especially Geoffery, M-C and Swarfing, cheers guys :beer::beer: I know most of the info is somewhere on the net but to have you point me in right direction is great.

Swarfing
13-04-2013, 01:06 AM
Nice one, put it this way once the machine is up and running you can make the bits you need to covert the head later if need be. Not sure what your box is like but most are very noisy which is another good reason to dump it. Get yourself a gear cutter and you can remake them as well if you wanted to.

GEOFFREY
13-04-2013, 01:12 AM
Well done Ross, I thought you had a pretty good chance of running that motor on 240V, and am glad you stuck with it, but filing the gears to make it fit - WOW. Congratulations. G.

Ross77
13-04-2013, 02:32 AM
put it this way once the machine is up and running you can make the bits you need to covert the head later if need be.

That's the plan, always been a bit chicken and egg with this hobby but now I have the egg.......


Not sure what your box is like but most are very noisy which is another good reason to dump

Yep it needs to go, just need to decide if I belt drive The AC Motor or do the DC conversion! fancy doing another 2 castings :whistle::whistle:


Well done Ross, I thought you had a pretty good chance of running that motor on 240V, and am glad you stuck with it, but filing the gears to make it fit - WOW. Congratulations. G.

Yeah got there in the end. Saved me a few quid and learned a thing or two, winner. Filing was a ball ache and not the best way as they are quite noisy in use but I figured that they weren't the originals and didn't fit so didn't have much to lose.

Just got the rest of the problems to work through now :thumbdown:

Swarfing
13-04-2013, 10:23 AM
To make them quieter you could make them out of phenolite (bakerlite looking stuff) or similar material, this is very quiet. I had a lathe gear made of the stuff on my old Southbend..Brilliant for sound....Going through all that hassle to sort the motor i would stick with that. Why waste money.

Ross77
13-04-2013, 11:31 AM
I think they are phenolite (browny redish colour). but I would have to remake the whole gear box as each meshing pair is made up of a metal and a plastic gear. Its mainly the gear I filed that is noisy but as that is in the chain for three of the speeds then its a bit of a problem.

I only wanted to get it working so the machine was complete if I decided to sell it in the future. I think belt drive will be much smoother as the notchy/cogging could be transferred to the tool tip and leave marks in the finish.

Ross77
27-05-2013, 02:40 AM
In response to a question from another member I have done a brief step by step guide on rewiring the 440v motor for 240V.

Thought I might as well post it in case it helps anyone else.


8974

Ross77
30-05-2013, 01:30 AM
So now its time to sort out the ball screws. Or actually the fixing and motor drive arrangement.

I have decided on 5 mm pitch and hopefully a singly suported 2005 on the y axis and double supported 1605 on the x axis but I still cant decide whether to direct drive or use pulleys! probably a silly question but any serious for's and against's?

I have been looking over the build logs and remembered/found Robins old warco conversion, I really like his idea of retaining the manually control. but not sure if it is worth the extra work or if it would put undue strain on the end of the ballscrew.

8984

The other way to do it is with a pendant or such like and manually control it electronically :0) again not sure which will be the most useful.

any advice or suggestions?
cheers

irving2008
30-05-2013, 02:42 PM
the advantage of 'manual' control with a pendant through Mach3 (or other control s/w) is you get accurate DRO capability. I wouldn't bother with adding hand-wheels; though there is no real danger of stressing the ball screws its a lot of effort with little benefit IMHO.

Ross77
30-05-2013, 11:09 PM
Thanks Irving, yeah I think I'm going back to that idea but just wanted to see what other peoples option were. I was also tempted to put encoders on the ball screws and have a permanent DRO / spindle speed on the machine.

The pendant is easier to implement but I still have in the back of my mind a comment someone said about the how nice it can be to to just grab the handles and machine or drill a few holes.

Looks like I will have to pester Robin on how often he uses the manual side of it :0)

Ross77
02-12-2014, 11:00 PM
Well another year has passed and this thing is still not up and running.....I now have all the ballscrews so time to sort the motors and mounts (grandfather clock massacre coming up :thumsup:)

Take 3

I need some help with the steppers. I have read a few threads and it seems that a nema 23 or 24 will be fine for this size mill and for financial reasons I'm stuck with the m542-G drivers that I got from Zapp and using a 40V supply. Hopping to direct drive a 3N motor on a 1605 ballscrew.

First question is which is the best 3 or 4N steeper at the moment?

Ive seen this one from zapp
http://www.zappautomation.co.uk/electrical-products/stepper-motors/nema-23-stepper-motors/sy60sth86-3008b-nema-23-stepper-motor.html

or this one from CNC 4U
http://www.cnc4you.co.uk/Stepper-Motor-Plus/Nema23-4Nm

Having bought from Gary before I was going to go the 3N one but if the 4N is just as good Id rather have the extra power.


Thanks in advance

Ross77
23-12-2014, 01:29 AM
Bit more progress. I have designed all the plates to convert the x and y axis to ball screws. looking to get these made up but before I put in a request for a quote what is the best grade aluminium to specify?

Also not sure if the motor mounts already exist so If any one knows where I can get them off the shelf then please let me know. google and ebay seem to throw up box section hacks.

Cheers

http://www.mycncuk.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=14197&stc=1http://www.mycncuk.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=14198&stc=1http://www.mycncuk.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=14192&stc=1http://www.mycncuk.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=14194&stc=1http://www.mycncuk.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=14195&stc=1http://www.mycncuk.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=14196&stc=1http://www.mycncuk.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=14193&stc=1

andre13442
13-01-2016, 01:06 AM
my problem is a mystery to me, I have, to my knowledge, tried everything to get my running spindle motor. The spindle motor is a DC motor max. 180 volts, placed on the spindle motor is a Rotery encoder with the outputs A and B and Z (Z but I do not use). The breakout board (5-axes) is a Mach3 HG08, ordered (CNC4YOU) Axes X, Y, Z, A, work perfectly. The B input is used for the spindle motor. Inputs are: GND, Vcc, CK, CW, AND (AND not connected). The first 5 are connected to a DG2S-16035 Servo drive (with 8 inputs total) via a UTP cable. Input 1 (CK) 2 (CW) 3 (GND) 4 (NOT USED) 5/6 (VCC) 7 (external DC power) 8 (External DC gnd). Encoder input of the DG2S-16 035 is connected via a UTP cable to an encoder interface, and the encoder interface is reconnected to the Rotery Encoder on the spindle motor. summarized: I have all the wires, cables, checked for fractures, but all cables are good. The settings in Mach3 (see photos). I have to be sure all components exchanged with new components, ie, the DG2S-16 035, the External Braking Circult Connector, Encoder Interface, and even the Breakout board (HG08), the Rotery Encoder, on The spindle motor, the result was the same, no rotating spindle.

Clive S
13-01-2016, 10:34 AM
Andre Welcome to the forum. This thread is over a year old now.

It might be better if you start another thread of your own so as to keep all the questions and answers in one place. and tittle it accordingly.

Can you post a picture up of the spindle as well. I am sure others will chime in with offers f help.

andre13442
13-01-2016, 02:01 PM
Andre Welcome to the forum. This thread is over a year old now.

It might be better if you start another thread of your own so as to keep all the questions and answers in one place. and tittle it accordingly.

Can you post a picture up of the spindle as well. I am sure others will chime in with offers f help.
Can you send me The link to start a new thread?, thank you.

Clive S
13-01-2016, 04:19 PM
Can you send me The link to start a new thread?, thank you.
Andre I see that you have this sorted now and started a new thread. Good Luck

andre13442
13-01-2016, 06:40 PM
Andre I see that you have this sorted now and started a new thread. Good Luck

okay, thanks (first time for me...lol)