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EddyCurrent
29-03-2014, 03:33 PM
I use these

PARTEX PA1 Number Cable Markers | eBay (http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/PARTEX-PA1-Number-Cable-Markers-/400233079188?pt=UK_BOI_Electrical_Components_Suppl ies_ET&var=&hash=item9bffc1bddb)

or there's a kit

Cable Marker Kit with Numbers 0 to 9 containing Partex PA1/3 Cable Markers | eBay (http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Cable-Marker-Kit-Numbers-0-9-containing-Partex-PA1-3-Cable-Markers-/380851593537?pt=UK_BOI_Electrical_Components_Suppl ies_ET&hash=item58ac862141)

also these but I don't use this type

Partex PA2 Compact Disc Cable Markers NUMBERS - Colour Coded | eBay (http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Partex-PA2-Compact-Disc-Cable-Markers-NUMBERS-Colour-Coded-/400422494504?pt=UK_BOI_Industrial_Automation_Contr ol_ET&var=&hash=item9c033a9e7e)

JAZZCNC
29-03-2014, 03:42 PM
Cheers Eddy I've actually just ordered from that Ebay site you've posted.

firetrappe
29-03-2014, 07:13 PM
I used these for my panel : Buy Cable Markers HellermannTyton Assorted Clip On Clip On Cable Marker, Pre-printed with 0 to 9, Pack of 200, HellermannTyton 561-05030 online from RS for next day delivery. (http://uk.rs-online.com/web/p/cable-markers/4084670/?searchTerm=408-4670&relevancy-data=636F3D3126696E3D4931384E525353746F636B4E756D6 265724D504E266C753D656E266D6D3D6D61746368616C6C267 06D3D5E5C647B337D5B5C732D2F255C2E2C5D5C647B332C347 D2426706F3D313426736E3D592673743D52535F53544F434B5 F4E554D4245522677633D4E4F4E45267573743D3430382D343 6373026)
Not as cost effective if you want loads of them, but it cost less than a tenner to do my panel.

BTW Ed, your machine is looking great. I still can't believe you managed to cram all your electronics in that enclosure! I'm using one the same size and gave up trying to get the VFD inside as well as everything else.

Si.

m_c
29-03-2014, 09:40 PM
I use the size down (rs part 408-4490) from the ones firetrappe listed, as I find they fit most normal wiring in control cabinets, without sliding up and down small wiring too much.
I prefer them because they clip together and you don't end up with the markers randomly moving along/around the cable.

Lee Roberts
29-03-2014, 10:09 PM
I like that top vent, do you have a source for them?

I'm hoping they come in 80mm square versions. I currently have regular fan filters at the top to stop crud getting in but I think the air flow restriction they cause will be too great so a vent like that would be perfect. The alternative is to fit a couple more fans at the top but that then risks creating a negative pressure in the case.

Cogs, for evey exhust fan you have, you need twice the amount for intake fans, this creates the "flow" through the box. I like the look of Eddys vent on the top but would have preferred to see a 4 fan array there instead or as well.

.Me

EddyCurrent
29-03-2014, 10:22 PM
I know this doesn't really count but the VFD has a built in fan. I ordered one of these;
New 90~250V 10A Digital Temperature Controller Thermostat -50~110℃„ƒ w/Sensor UK | eBay (http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/New-90-250V-10A-Digital-Temperature-Controller-Thermostat-50-110-f-w-Sensor-UK-/171255265565?pt=UK_BOI_Industrial_Automation_Contr ol_ET&hash=item27df9bf91d)

it will control the 2 fans, if I see the temperature increase above what seems reasonable I will modify the cooling setup.

Neale
01-04-2014, 02:02 PM
Picking up on your earlier reply to a question from me - you said that you would bolt the mounting plates to the top beam rather than weld them, to avoid distorting the beam. Does that mean that you would not want to weld the beams directly to the upright supports, even though you are using epoxy to level the top surface afterwards? I had been thinking of tack-welding the whole frame, then carefully running full welds in progressively.
Maybe once I've started welding less critical bits of the support frame I shall get an idea of how much distortion to expect, but at the moment I'm trying to learn from the experience of others!

mekanik
01-04-2014, 02:58 PM
Hi Eddy
I have been having a think about the distortion problem, did you weld all round the pads ? perhaps if the weld was just on the long sides it might not have distorted as bad.
Just a thought
Mike

EddyCurrent
01-04-2014, 05:55 PM
@Neale, If you intend to weld the top beams to the frame instead of bolting, that's fine, you will of course have to use the epoxy routine. The reason I wanted to bolt them was to avoid the epoxy bit but in the end I still had to do it.
Another reason I had to use epoxy was due to the top beams leaning out slightly. When I tacked and welded them I had two pieces of wood between with perfectly square ends and the whole lot was clamped together with two long sash clamps. I thought this would keep them vertical but unfortunately it did not.

@Mike, Yes I welded all round the pads, you might be right about just welding the sides.

EddyCurrent
01-04-2014, 10:01 PM
More progress, getting there now.
If anyone thinks the energy chain looks big, I still have some 8mm pipes to put in and at least one more cable.
Junction box on the machine, the cables from the panel will festoon down to allow movement of the machine but they will probably have some spiral wrap around them eventually.
On the right, inside the junction box, you can see where I've just passed the spindle cable directly through the box, this is to have no additional terminals between the VFD and the spindle motor,
11977

Energy chain now arrived and fitted, note the grey plastic curved piece to transition the cables form the tray to the junction box. This was made from one of my favourite sources of material, soil pipe offcuts. The 110mm soil pipes are made from plastic that can be shaped with a paint stripping heat gun, just cut it lengthways and slowly heat until it lies flat, you get a piece over 300mm x whatever length you cut.
I used Dexion slotted angle iron for the energy chain trough mainly because I've had a load sitting in the garage for years. With energy chain it's advantageous to have a trough that is open because it allows debris to fall through without collecting in the bottom causing all kinds of problems.
11978

A small aluminium box just fitted nicely under the energy chain bracket to allow connection of limits and home switches.
11979

Just a view from the front. Unfortunately my great set up is no good now because the energy chain crashes into the keyboard and monitor bracket so a bit of rearranging will be required.
11980

Got it going to it's home position today but there seems to be an issue with the slaved A axis, I might have to fit a switch on this after all. As it is with just a home switch for X, it reaches the switch and just comes to a halt, unlike with Z and Y where it backs off slightly. I tried unchecking the home limit selection for A in Mach3 but that made it worse. Will have to read up tonight about options for that, further reading on this subject here http://www.mycncuk.com/forums/gantry-router-type-machine-building/7213-setup-squaring-twin-x-axis-gantry.html

firetrappe
01-04-2014, 10:41 PM
Ed, looking very nice and professional. Nice work!

Regarding the Homing issues, have you configured the ESS plugin in Mach?
I haven't got as far as you yet, but I know there have been some compatability issues between certain versions of Mach and the ESS plugins.

Have a read of this thread on the Warp9 forums : Forum (http://warp9td.com/index.php/kunena/7-general-discussion/4890-auto-squaring-in-mach3?start=48)
You will need to register to read it if you haven't joined already.

Si.

Ger21
01-04-2014, 10:51 PM
Have a read of this thread on the Warp9 forums : Forum (http://warp9td.com/index.php/kunena/7-general-discussion/4890-auto-squaring-in-mach3?start=48)


I find it amazing that it took him 6 years to get the Smoothstepper to do Homing the way that Mach3 does. No wonder people have always had homing issues with the Smoothstepper.

EddyCurrent
01-04-2014, 10:59 PM
@Si, thanks for the link, I looked at this a while ago and subsequently forgot about it, I'll give it a read now and have a go tomorrow. To be honest I kind of ignore the Smoothstepper and just do everything from Mach3, maybe it's time I got a better grip on it.

firetrappe
01-04-2014, 11:29 PM
I find it amazing that it took him 6 years to get the Smoothstepper to do Homing the way that Mach3 does. No wonder people have always had homing issues with the Smoothstepper.

Yeah I agree. I ordered the ESS and then found some recent posts by you on the 'zone. I thought I might have made the wrong decision with the ESS, but luckily it finally seems to be sorted. It's just a shame that it's not obvious on the Warp9 pages. An occasional changelog file to accompany the various new plugins might help!

Hopefully once I get my machine i'll be able to find a version of Mach and ESS plugin that play nicely together and also with your screenset.

Ed - If you find a solution then please post your settings and which versions of Mach/ESS you're using. It might save me from similar issues.

Si.

GEOFFREY
01-04-2014, 11:42 PM
Eddy, that machine looks great, but I would not have expected less from you!!! G.

Ger21
02-04-2014, 12:34 AM
From what I understand, 3.043.066 and .067 are very buggy, and it's best to use 3.043.057 or .062.

Yes, the SS homing issues have kept me from even considering a Smoothstepper.
Whenever I get my next router finished, I'll be going with a CSMIO/IP-S, unless I move away from Mach.

EddyCurrent
03-04-2014, 09:05 PM
All being well it should be ready to do a test cut tomorrow, the bed isn't fitted yet but that won't stop it having a go. Edit: just thought, I might not have suitable cutters for anything detailed.

Got the temperature controller fitted, ideal for under 9, it brings the fans on at 25 degC at the moment, it was 21deg ambient in the shed today (logs were good burners) so they were on and off quite regular.
Second photo shows the remote sensor in the ventilation hood, it's held in place with a 'girder clip' for cables.
Also I moved the monitor/keyboard arm further up the wall so that it clears the highest part of the machine when moving, it looks a bit mental but Aldi had a nice little 2 step set of caravan steps just the right height for comfortable access, plus it's a bit of physical exercise.

1199511996

Now to the homing problem.
This my setup;

* The X axis (the longest) has two stepper motors, X and A axis, each driving a ball screw.(A is a slave of X)
* I'm saying that the gantry is rigid enough so that I only need one homing switch on the X motor side.
* I'm also saying that if Mach does it's dance with the switches where it backs off slightly once activated, my gantry is stiff enough that the AM882's trip on stall at the slightest racking which is another reason I only want one homing switch on X.
* A ESS SmoothStepper is installed.
* Mach3 version 3.043.066
* SmoothStepper plugin version 10o1d1h

Edit: input 5 of the bob has stopped working for some reason, I was going to use this as input for a separate home switch on the A if I decided to go with two switches.

So I got all the setting as right as I could in Mach3 and the Smooth Stepper dialogues. The important one here was to tick the box called 'Home Slave With Master Axis'

Hit the ref Z button in Mach3, axis homed no problem
Hit the ref Y button in Mach3, axis homed no problem
Hit the ref X button in Mach3, axis tried to home but nearly wrecked the machine due to one side jumping severely.

I unbolted the ball nut bracket from the A axis side and tried again, the problem was the X motor was driving but the A motor remained stationary.
Uninstalled Mach and installed version 3.043.062, same SmoothStepper plugin, still no good, same results.
Installed SmoothStepper plugin version 10h2d1a, it worked !
Uninstalled Mach3 version 3.043.062, installed version 3.043.066, it worked !

I also tried other versions of the SmoothStepper plugin without success.

So the combination that works for me is Mach3 version 3.043.66 or version 3.043.62 and the SmoothStepper plugin version 10h2d1a.

It's interesting that if you read the Warp9 forum they talk about a version of the plugin that has a homing dialogue page that let's you specify homing parameters similar to the offsets in Mach3 but that version of the plugin failed to work for me. The version that works, 10h2d1a, does not have a homing dialogue page so everything is done from inside Mach3.

EddyCurrent
04-04-2014, 02:39 PM
I was forced to cut something today !

Small Aztec Calendar, http://www.mycncuk.com/forums/workshop-equipment/6981-chinese-3040t-arrives-4.html#post53632

Using cutter shown which was best I currently had, machine bed consisting of one piece of 18mm plywood held with one clamp to frame, mdf workpiece held with double sided tape.
So rather crappy but it works :triumphant:

According to Mach3 it took 55.35 minutes to cut (if that's what you can call it)

11999

Ambient in the shed was 21 degC and throughout the cutting the panel cooling fans kept things to 25 degC with ease. I have them set to come on at 27 degC and off at 25 degC

Clive S
04-04-2014, 02:46 PM
It's nice when you cut one of those for the first time. Where did you get your dxf from I think I had trouble with mine getting the full size without doing a lot of editing. :yahoo: ..Clive

EddyCurrent
04-04-2014, 03:27 PM
It's nice when you cut one of those for the first time. Where did you get your dxf from I think I had trouble with mine getting the full size without doing a lot of editing. :yahoo: ..Clive

It's in the link I put there http://www.mycncuk.com/forums/workshop-equipment/6981-chinese-3040t-arrives-4.html#post53632
It's one Dean made smaller I think, it's not the great big version, it needs renaming to .ncc instead of the .cnc

GEOFFREY
04-04-2014, 03:28 PM
Great stuff Eddy, well done, now youcan start to think about cutting something intricate!!! G.

EddyCurrent
04-04-2014, 03:33 PM
Thanks, for a start I'll need to get some small ball nose cutters, it's something I've never needed to use in the past.

m.marino
04-04-2014, 04:34 PM
Looking wonderful and very professional. Very well done. One question though (ducking behind the wall) where's the lube blocks???:whistle:

Just being cheeky as you have done a very very good job and I am in the process of getting my control box anywhere near the well laid out set up you have done. -Michael

ba99297
04-04-2014, 04:49 PM
Eddy i am not professional but i want to say that your job looks grate. I don’t know if there are mistakes but for sure there is much good mood. One more time congratulations for your job. I manage that soon i will start mine cnc router.....

EddyCurrent
04-04-2014, 05:20 PM
Looking wonderful and very professional. Very well done. One question though (ducking behind the wall) where's the lube blocks???:whistle:

Just being cheeky as you have done a very very good job and I am in the process of getting my control box anywhere near the well laid out set up you have done. -Michael

Michael, thanks for the positive comments but sorry I can't figure out what you mean by "lube blocks", please elaborate.

EddyCurrent
04-04-2014, 05:22 PM
Eddy i am not professional but i want to say that your job looks grate. I don’t know if there are mistakes but for sure there is much good mood. One more time congratulations for your job. I manage that soon i will start mine cnc router.....

Vagelis, thank you for your thoughts it's much appreciated, I will keep watching your build log.

I still have the bed to finish but I've ordered a sheet of 18mm birch plywood today and I will be bolting one half to the steel frame, give it a skim with the router to get it flat, then screw the other half on top and give it a final small skim. As I intend cutting wood that will be fine but if aluminium needs cut I'll have to mount it in a shallow pan to catch the cutting fluid.

m.marino
04-04-2014, 06:36 PM
Eddy,

Lube points for bearing surfaces. When they are brought to a common point for charging it is called a lube block as it is either a single pump point with a multiport outlet or it is a bunch of singles that are bolted together to make a block that is mounted to the machine. I hope that makes sense used to install them all the time on machines to be able to lube a area within the machine without having to tear part of it apart. -Michael

EddyCurrent
04-04-2014, 08:30 PM
Ah I see now, I'm using grease not oil so it's a manual operation with a grease gun. I think I would refer to the 'lube block' as a 'manifold'

m.marino
04-04-2014, 11:22 PM
Correct same thing. Though they can be used for both grease or oil depending on how they are set up. Most of the ones we did where grease under low pressure so that the line would do a slow feed which helped keep clean grease where you needed it. -Michael

firetrappe
04-04-2014, 11:46 PM
I also tried other versions of the SmoothStepper plugin without success.

So the combination that works for me is Mach3 version 3.043.66 or version 3.043.62 and the SmoothStepper plugin version 10h2d1a.

It's interesting that if you read the Warp9 forum they talk about a version of the plugin that has a homing dialogue page that let's you specify homing parameters similar to the offsets in Mach3 but that version of the plugin failed to work for me. The version that works, 10h2d1a, does not have a homing dialogue page so everything is done from inside Mach3.

Thanks for the info Ed. Sounds like you tested your E-stop circuit a few times during the process!

I think i'll definately try that combo on my setup first. Hopefully it will work even though i'm using 2 homing switches on the X-axis. I'll let you know how I get on.

Si.

mekanik
05-04-2014, 06:20 PM
sorry double posted

mekanik
05-04-2014, 06:22 PM
Ah I see now, I'm using grease not oil so it's a manual operation with a grease gun. I think I would refer to the 'lube block' as a 'manifold'

And you would not be alone(Lubrication Distribution Manifold)

EddyCurrent
24-04-2014, 04:16 PM
Today I changed the wiring for the AM882 alarms.

Initially each drive had the alarm set to 'High' so that if a fault occurred the internal alarm contact would close. I have four AM882's so the internal contacts were connected in parallel with an external relay in series fed from 24 volt DC so that if any drive went into fault it would energise the external relay.
This was okay until someone queried it this week highlighting the fact that if any drive lost input power then the external alarm relay would not energise. This is most important where the X axis uses two separate motors.
So using ProTuner I changed the alarm settings to 'Low' and connected the 4 off AM882's internal relays in series along with the external relay, see drawing.
Now the external relay is energised when all AM882's are powered up and healthy, if one goes into fault or loses input power than the external relay will de-energise indicating a fault condition.

12197

For anyone using a PDMX bob FAULT input (J13) they should connect the AM882's as in the diagram using a relay, then connect the normally closed NC contacts of the relay to the PDMX FAULT(J13) input and Gnd(J13)
This means when the relay is energised the PDMX Fault input will be High (floating) and LOW when the relay is de-energised (connected to Gnd)

From the PDMX manual;
"The Fault input provides an interface for external fault detection circuits. This signal is “active low”, meaning that a logic “low” (or ground) indicates a fault condition, and a logic high (or floating) means “all is OK”.

EddyCurrent
24-04-2014, 04:37 PM
Link to a dust shoe experiment.
http://www.mycncuk.com/forums/open-source-machine-designs-parts-plans/6388-open-source-dust-shoe-designs-3.html#post57624

Lloyd
08-05-2014, 11:16 PM
eddy, your machine looks great - very inspiring... makes me want to start mine asap!

everything you've posted will no doubt be of use for me - so thanks in advanced for that...

longy
26-06-2014, 03:28 PM
Aluminium, L shape using 100x50x6 aluminium box, faced with a 6mm x 150 aluminium plate.
116101161111612

Looks great Eddy, where did you get 100 x 50 x 6mm aluminium box profile from ? I can only seem to find 3mm

Mike

EddyCurrent
26-06-2014, 09:26 PM
It's a while since I logged in, the problems I've had with computersand internet since a lightning strike several weeks back have been unbelievable, still not out of the woods yet so just a quick reply.

Here, but you might have to phone them for that size as they don't keep all sizes in stock.
http://www.thomas-graham.co.uk/aluminiumboxsection.html

longy
28-06-2014, 05:51 PM
Thanks Eddy, for the link I'll give them a call. Sorry to hear about your PC + IS problems, is there anything we can do to help ?
Mike

Boyan Silyavski
30-06-2014, 12:30 AM
* I'm saying that the gantry is rigid enough so that I only need one homing switch on the X motor side.
* I'm also saying that if Mach does it's dance with the switches where it backs off slightly once activated, my gantry is stiff enough that the AM882's trip on stall at the slightest racking which is another reason I only want one homing switch on X..

Is that still valid? I am right there and having very similar ideas

TonyD
30-06-2014, 02:14 AM
I thought the 882's won't back off on stall detect unless they are above 300 rpm? That's why I have to go to 2 home switches on x, I've seen it rack the machine a little and the 882's didn't alarm.

EddyCurrent
30-06-2014, 01:32 PM
Is that still valid? I am right there and having very similar ideas

If the gantry racks then it is that small a movement I don't care. I disconnected one side and tried to push it, I could feel no movement but I did not use a dial indicator.
The AM882's have tripped on stall but only when I've tried to get too much speed/acceleration from the machine, when tuned to sensible values they do not trip.
I don't know if they tripped due to racking or something else.
I am still using only one homing switch on the X axis and that is working fine for me, your machine (silyavski) will be stiffer then mine I imagine so it should work for you too.
If anyone has doubts they should probably use one motor and connect the two ball screws with belts.

EddyCurrent
30-06-2014, 01:36 PM
I thought the 882's won't back off on stall detect unless they are above 300 rpm? That's why I have to go to 2 home switches on x, I've seen it rack the machine a little and the 882's didn't alarm.


I don't know about the 300rpm bit, I've never noticed what speed they were doing when they tripped.

EddyCurrent
30-06-2014, 01:59 PM
Thanks Eddy, for the link I'll give them a call. Sorry to hear about your PC + IS problems, is there anything we can do to help ?
Mike


Thank's for the offer but I seem to be okay now, just letting things 'soak' for a few days to make sure.

Lighting strikes destroys phones and router, waiting for repairs, computer playing up, waiting for new parts, new parts fail after a week but only after reinstalling eveything and activating Windows, failed motherboard renders hard drive as 'Raw', manage to use PartedMagic to retrive stuff off drive, 10 day wait for replacement board so after 5 days decide to get another make/model next day delivery, eventually get everything running and installed, decided 32bit OS not good anymore so order 64bit and more memory, get it all installed and activated when hard drive comes up with bad sectors, find out new system is UEFI and not so simple to clone so order Paragon software which works great, order SSD and clone system, wating to see if all okay before reinstalling everthing this time.

JAZZCNC
30-06-2014, 02:27 PM
Tony you are correct the stall detect on the AM882 only works above 300rpm. In real use that's fine because thats when your post likely to stall motors as torque is lowest. It's also when you need it most as it's the speed and inertia that does the damage.

Regards the one home switch with twin screws then like Eddy it's a preferance thing but don't be fooled into thinking your Gantry is strong enough it's not going to rack because it most certainly will and more so over time with eddy's setup of using one switch.? . . . Problem comes from the fact you will be accumulating lost or missed steps that never get reset this will eventually cause racking or binding that will cause stalled motors.
Also don't think just because you have the motors tuned well below there threshold your safe from lost steps because your not.? . . . . Every time you E-stop the machine at any resonable speed you have the potential to lose steps due to inertia pushing the gantry/motors. Now unless you always bring the machine to a controlled stop then you have to presume you have lost position and reset your home position.! . . . With eddy's setup only the one screw/motor is effectively reset and any error in the other remains! Do this often enough and It's definate fact you WILL get racking and stalled motors along with premature wear.

EddyCurrent
30-06-2014, 03:08 PM
Okay, let's revisit the scenario, this is how I imagine it with 2 home switches on X

The gantry is moving back to the home position, one side hits it's home switch first so it stops and backs off slightly, now the gantry moves again until the other home switch is hit, the gantry stops and backs off slightly.
First off, is that correct ?, if not then let's have an explanation of what really happens.

Questions;

1. Do both X home switches have to set so they both activate together exactly when the gantry is at the physical 'square' position ?
2. If so, we are now relying on the repeatability of the switches for machine accuracy.
3. Imagine a cutting job has just been completed so that the gantry has been up and down loads of times and it's now out of square. When it comes back to the home position it will hit one home switch first, so then what happens ?

Neale
30-06-2014, 04:16 PM
I've spent odd moments wondering how this two-motor setup could be made to home in LinuxCNC (which doesn't support it out of the box). What I think should happen is:
1. Both motors head for home at "find home" speed.
2. One home switch trips. Stop both motors; drive both motors back at "slow home" speed until same switch resets. Now one side of gantry is correct.
3. Second motor is sent towards home position at slow speed until its switch trips. Now drive it back at slow speed until its switch resets. Now both sides of gantry are correct.
In principle, this all sounds OK, except for two points. First is what happens if the gantry is really, really, stiff - this homing process is trying to deliberately rack it. Second is what happens if both switches trip closely enough together that the software can't distinguish it. You could choose one motor arbitrarily and then move the other one away from home a very small amount and then it's back to step 3. Or do you say, "Close enough - let's call this homed". Don't know what the Mach3 homing routines do.
I think that the answer to your question 2 is yes, you do have to rely on switch repeatability. However, Jazz did some measurements a little while ago (in response to some comment of mine) and they do appear to be surprisingly repeatable. I seem to remember 10 microns or so, which should be good enough. Answer to question 1 is that however you home it, assuming that it wasn't spot on first time, and then rehome, you are going to hit this situation - so my hypothetical "both switches trip together" situation is almost certain to occur fairly often. And that's the answer to question 3 as well.
I'm not even sure that this two-motor homing is possible in LinuxCNC due to the way that the internal motion control logic works with two motors - don't know if you can execute the homing logic outlined above - so it's all a bit theoretical for me at present. Guess who's going to go with single motor/belt-drive to two ballscrews, at least in the first instance...

JAZZCNC
30-06-2014, 04:54 PM
Ok Both motors drive upto first switch then both back off then Slaved motor drives upto it's own switch while Master stays still then backs off.
So yes if your switches are far away from each other then you can affectively rack the gantry square but that would be silly wouldn't it and no one with half a brain would do that to any great degree. In practice then your switches are so close together they do affectively trip at the same time but that doesn't matter because it means your square anyway. Think of it like Homing the The Z axis then without moving it pushing home again, the axis still moves onto then off switch then goes back to same place if switches are accurate, same principle with slaved switch being at exactly same place as master.
This is why EACH SCREW on the shared AXIS needs it's own switch on it's OWN INPUT so that when they trip together only the Master switch is being watched and when it does trip both motors back off, then ONLY the slave motor drives back onto it's OWN switch then backs off. So if this switch is located at the same place as Master switch (which it should be if everything is square and correct) it drives on and off the switch then ends at exactly the same place.
In practice the amount of movement of slaved motor is so minimal you don't actually see it happen because the trip point is fractions of millimeters away.!!

Yes again to some degree your relying switch accuracy but like as been shown even low quality switches give micron level repeatabilty.

Now with your single switch setup then ever time you home only the one screw is located at the position it started. Lets look at it like this.?

Both screws start at Zero(home) and travel in sync until you hit the E-stop at which point one or both axis lose position. So you then return to home(zero) to re-register Zero position which is defined by the single switch. But this switch is only moving the Master axis back to Zero the other remains at some arbitory position depending on how many steps it lost. This can then accumulate over time so between E-stops and general positional loss thru dropped steps(which will be low if correctly tuned) then you slowly rack the machine and can never truely be sure or certain the gantry is square.!

I've said this many times but if I was using Slaved motors without out Dual home switches then your better off with Hard Stops which locates the gantry square and slowly drive upto to them. Again this way you know you are square and can Zero with confidence knowing both motors are back where they started from.
Other ways is to use cheap dial indicator on each axis and manually turn each axis until reads zero but then you may has well use 2 switches as it just the same.?

EddyCurrent
30-06-2014, 06:52 PM
Ok Both motors drive upto first switch then both back off then Slaved motor drives upto it's own switch while Master stays still then backs off.

This is the bit that bothers me. After one side has hit the home switch and the gantry has backed off, the other side now has to travel the 'backed off' distance until it reaches it's home switch. What I'm saying is, I don't think my machine is flexible enough to allow that to happen, and even if it was, do I want it to go through this stress each time it homes ?

JAZZCNC
30-06-2014, 11:59 PM
This is the bit that bothers me. After one side has hit the home switch and the gantry has backed off, the other side now has to travel the 'backed off' distance until it reaches it's home switch. What I'm saying is, I don't think my machine is flexible enough to allow that to happen, and even if it was, do I want it to go through this stress each time it homes ?

If your gantry is square and your switches located level which they should be if square then the amount it moves is minimal.!. . Not even 1mm.

Now No disrespect meant here Eddy but your gantry won't be that stiff that it won't flex under the mechanical advantage of a ballscrew and stepper, ive seen much stronger than yours flex. If you want to test this then Just disconnect one motor and set the other going and see what happens. .:hopelessness:

The machine nor the gantry is stressed when things are correct, it's only when the gantry is out of square and your forcing it back square are stress's put on the machine. Like I say when machine is setup square and correctly you wouldn't even see it happen it's that small a movement.!

longy
02-07-2014, 09:21 PM
failed motherboard renders hard drive as 'Raw', manage to use PartedMagic to retrive stuff off drive

That will only put the partition back so your system can see it, try http://www.roadkil.net/index.php for their data recover software brilliant software as it tries to fix bad sectors and recover the data. Roadkil's Unstoppable Copier + other stuff and what's more it's FREE.

Glad to see your back online, just remember to unplug during a storm, I've had to fix several PC's over the years, the flash down the line normally kills some of the ram you wont know until that blue screen shows when you least expect it, or it fails to boot.

kingcreaky
03-07-2014, 10:50 PM
I had to strip it down a bit today because there was still a BK and FK bearing to sort out, both had bearings in facing the same way and no grease, made shims, greased, reassembled.
More progress, ready to order some energy chain and start wiring and I'm very pleased the panel is already built.

11883

Limit and home switch for Z axis, there is one switch and two strikers. For the home switches I mounted a piece of 6mm thick mild steel to aluminium angle to act as the target.

11884

Motor mount for Y axis

11885

limit switch and adjustable striker for Y axis, there's another striker at the other end of the gantry, so one switch with two strikers.

11886


Ive been aware of this thread for a while, but tonight, only just read it.

Nice Design!!!. Must say, hats off to you much better than mine. I think every single thing I wished I did with mine you have done here... Proper Rails, I like the extra plate at the top of the Y carriage (making a figure 8) The X steppers inside the gantry (rather than sticking out). and the general quality of the build looks superb

Credit to you chap. Got to start thinking about my next build soon...

Ger21
04-07-2014, 01:21 AM
Ok Both motors drive upto first switch then both back off then Slaved motor drives upto it's own switch while Master stays still then backs off.


Sorry my friend, but that is not correct. I didn't think so when I read it, so I just went out to the garage to check. My machine has a lot of flex, so I can easily rack the gantry one way or the other. I have dampers on my steppers, so with the power off, I can move one side by turning the dampers.

First I moved the master side about 3mm away from home, then powered up the machine, and homed the X axis. The slave axis hits the switch, and backs off, while the master keeps moving to it's switch, then it backs off.

Next, I moved the slave side 3mm farther from home. This time, the master hits the switch, and backs off, while the slave keeps moving.

Each side of the gantry (master and slave) move independently to their own switches. For all practical purposes, they are not slaved during homing.


1. Do both X home switches have to set so they both activate together exactly when the gantry is at the physical 'square' position ?

Yes, but technically, no. The Home position is not set when the switch activates, but when it deactivates as it's backing off. So technically, the switches need to be set so that they both deactivate when the gantry is square


2. If so, we are now relying on the repeatability of the switches for machine accuracy.

Yes, but as Jazz said, even cheap switches are quite accurate. The DIY Hall switches I use are supposed to ba accurate to about .01mm or better, and only cost about $3 each to make them. The most important factor is accurately positioning the switches.


3. Imagine a cutting job has just been completed so that the gantry has been up and down loads of times and it's now out of square. When it comes back to the home position it will hit one home switch first, so then what happens ?
The side that hits the switch will back off and stop, while the other side continues to it's switch, squaring the gantry.

Depending on the type of switch, you may or may not actually see the machine back off the switch. On my machine, it backs off such a small amount that it appears to just stop.

JAZZCNC
04-07-2014, 02:43 AM
Sorry my friend, but that is not correct. I didn't think so when I read it, so I just went out to the garage to check. My machine has a lot of flex, so I can easily rack the gantry one way or the other. I have dampers on my steppers, so with the power off, I can move one side by turning the dampers.

First I moved the master side about 3mm away from home, then powered up the machine, and homed the X axis. The slave axis hits the switch, and backs off, while the master keeps moving to it's switch, then it backs off.

Next, I moved the slave side 3mm farther from home. This time, the master hits the switch, and backs off, while the slave keeps moving.

Each side of the gantry (master and slave) move independently to their own switches. For all practical purposes, they are not slaved during homing.

To be honest Gerry I wasn't 100% sure my self it worked like I said and couldn't can't check as I don't have slaved motors on my machine. Last machine I setup that used slaved motors was several weeks ago and was using the ESS but I'm sure that stopped both motors and backed off then moved slave.? Thou I'd have to check again to be 100%. I don't ever use PP so can't check if it works differant to Motion control cards but I will on next slaved machine I'm building just out of curiosity. Previous machine also used Motion control card but that was Russian PLCM and thought that did the same but again can't be 100%.? Esp as it happens so fast and with gantry being square so hard to see.!

But more the point was they work together to square the gantry and like as been said if the gantry's setup square to start with and switches located at same point it's a seamless operation and very little twisting forces applied if correctly setup.

Edit: One other thing for clarity for others (Gerry knows this ).? The speed at which you home makes a big difference to accuracy and how far it over shoots then as to backoff. Thick of it as driving wheels upto a line in your car.! At fast speed chances are you'll over shoot further then have to back up more to put wheels on line. Same principle go slower and chances are you'll hit the line ever time with little to no over shoot.

Ger21
04-07-2014, 03:59 AM
Homing in motion controllers is done differently than with the parallel port, so you may be correct with the SS. I know it's taken several years for Greg to get slaved homing to work correctly with the SS.

EddyCurrent
11-07-2014, 03:13 PM
Bruce,

This is the circuit as it is on the machine.

12761

EddyCurrent
11-07-2014, 03:15 PM
Ive been aware of this thread for a while, but tonight, only just read it.

Nice Design!!!. Must say, hats off to you much better than mine. I think every single thing I wished I did with mine you have done here... Proper Rails, I like the extra plate at the top of the Y carriage (making a figure 8) The X steppers inside the gantry (rather than sticking out). and the general quality of the build looks superb

Credit to you chap. Got to start thinking about my next build soon...

Thanks for that, but it was thanks to your initial drawing and design that really took me from floundering to finding a route through it.

Lee Roberts
11-07-2014, 10:12 PM
Surge protectors here, the one with RJ45 support. Though allot are wifi''ing it up now days.

.Me

JAZZCNC
17-07-2014, 11:30 PM
Homing in motion controllers is done differently than with the parallel port, so you may be correct with the SS. I know it's taken several years for Greg to get slaved homing to work correctly with the SS.

Going back a little here to homing but was looking thru Mach manual today and noticed this in the Homing/limits section.

"When a Reference operation is performed, then the axes will run together until the final part of referencing, which
is moving just off the Home switches. Here they will move so that each stops the same distance off its
own switch. Referencing will therefore correct any racking (i.e. out of squareness) of the gantry, which
might have occurred when the machine was switched off or because of lost steps."

So they do a mixture of both really has they are slaved upto point it's backing OFF the Switch.!! Tonight Just checked on machine that is using PLCM-E3 and it works just like this. . . . . . Just thought this might clear any confussion.

EddyCurrent
18-07-2014, 10:31 AM
So after that bit of RTFM, here's how I would set up the homing switches;

Assuming 2 home switches used on X

1. One switch can be mounted in a fixed position while the other switch needs to be + and - adjustable in the X direction.
2. Using some form of measuring equipment e.g. large T square, set both switches square to the X axis.
3. Carry out a homing operation of the machine then using the same measuring apparatus as in step 2. check squareness of the gantry to X axis
4. If the gantry is not square then move the adjustable home switch by the required amount and in the required direction.
5. Repeat steps 3 and 4 until the gantry is square to the X axis.

Clive S
18-07-2014, 11:11 AM
Eddy Spot on, simples, can't just remember if the slave needs to be the adjustable one. I drilled some holes down the x and y then put dowels in then the square against the dowels. then readjusted the switch and tried again. ..Clive

Boyan Silyavski
18-07-2014, 12:56 PM
The led of the switch is a big help.
Honestly I can't be happier that I made my gantry to square via Mach3. When I moved it by hand I was doubtful that is needed. But once it moved 100m then the Hiwin loosened a bit and I see the benefit of squaring with a push of a button.

JAZZCNC
18-07-2014, 07:42 PM
The led of the switch is a big help.
Honestly I can't be happier that I made my gantry to square via Mach3. When I moved it by hand I was doubtful that is needed. But once it moved 100m then the Hiwin loosened a bit and I see the benefit of squaring with a push of a button.

Yes and if using slaved motors it's also having the piece of mind that things are correct and dropped or missed steps are not building up.
Like I said before even thou gantrys are built and look strong and they will drive just from one side when pushed etc you will always get some racking to some degree or another. When one motor stops while other keeps moving then the mechanical advantage of the ballscrew even with relatively small steppers attached will twist even very strong gantry's like Boyan's(Silyavski) if this happens you have no way to know unless referenced with marks or switches.!

cncJim
01-09-2014, 12:21 PM
Hey Eddy,

Been away from the forum for a while and just reread your build. Really good stuff!

Just got myself a small workshop together (mill - lathe on the way) and starting to learn the ropes and having a blast!

Thanks!

Jim

EddyCurrent
11-11-2014, 04:14 PM
Still not got a dust shoe sorted due to not having found the ideal design, maybe this is it ?
I'm going to make it out of wood first to see how it performs, then use perspex.
I wanted it to be adjustable so the bottom of the skirt was flush with the bottom of the cutter, or thereabouts. It's not so handy that my spindle does not have a rounded body and has air exit holes at the bottom for the top mounted fan exhaust. Skirt held on with 3 pairs of magnets, allows easy access and different length skirts to be used, mini, knee length, evening gown.

Any thoughts ?

13833 13834 13835


It's got one of these on the other end; 13843

JAZZCNC
11-11-2014, 07:35 PM
skirts to be used, mini, knee length,

I've always prefered "Around ankles". .:joker:

Sorry can't help much here but mate of mine made something similiar but it didn't work so well if I remember but not sure why.? Will give him a ring ask and report back.

GEOFFREY
12-11-2014, 12:23 AM
Eddy, if you make it spring/pneumatic loaded, the skirt can be arranged to be always in contact with the media top face. The main disadvantage with dust shoes etc is that you loose sight of the actual machining. G.

EddyCurrent
12-11-2014, 09:47 AM
Geoffrey, I was going to make it like that, but during some earlier trials, I found on some 3D stuff that if it didn't follow the tool down, then gaps around the bottom would appear in some areas.
Getting tension right might work but I can't see how it could be controlled very well. I was thinking that by some mechanical arrangement, the dust shoe could be made to advance at a slower speed that the tool, say 60%, I'll have to think about that.

Edit: now I've had some mackerel for breakfast thinking has improved. Looking at the pictures in my earlier post, the dust shoe is supported by two rods held in blocks with wing nuts. If those blocks were replaced by a tube with a spring inside this might apply the right pressure. As the tool advances so would the pressure on the springs and the shoe would lower slightly. Adjusters could be made to alter spring tension.

JAZZCNC
12-11-2014, 10:50 AM
I found on some 3D stuff that if it didn't follow the tool down, then gaps around the bottom would appear in some areas.

Eddy spoke to my friend last night about this and it was exactly this reason why it didn't work well for him. It worked fine for panel work and engraving etc but was rubbish for Deep 3D work and he mainly makes casting moulds on his machine so no good.
He's played with various setups and found that the only way to deal with 3D with any decent success is to have a larger vaccum area and with big bore vacuum. The little vacs couldn't get enough volume over the larger area.!! . . . Basicly you need excess vacuum to blitz the area.
He said Small shop vac was fine for everything but deep 3D work.

EddyCurrent
12-11-2014, 11:05 AM
Eddy spoke to my friend last night about this and it was exactly this reason why it didn't work well for him. It worked fine for panel work and engraving etc but was rubbish for Deep 3D work and he mainly makes casting moulds on his machine so no good.
He's played with various setups and found that the only way to deal with 3D with any decent success is to have a larger vaccum area and with big bore vacuum. The little vacs couldn't get enough volume over the larger area.!! . . . Basicly you need excess vacuum to blitz the area.
He said Small shop vac was fine for everything but deep 3D work.

Thanks, that sounds right because sometimes with deep profiles using a 6mm cutter the vac struggles to lift dust from the bottom of the slot. I have a 4" extractor but it's a lot noisier than the small one, maybe I can make two dust shoes, one for each vac.

Jonathan
12-11-2014, 12:02 PM
I have a 4" extractor but it's a lot noisier than the small one, maybe I can make two dust shoes, one for each vac.

6" is much better than 4" ... http://billpentz.com/woodworking/cyclone/ducting.cfm#ducting_introduction

GEOFFREY
12-11-2014, 11:12 PM
6" is much better than 4" ... http://billpentz.com/woodworking/cyclone/ducting.cfm#ducting_introduction

You are dead right Jon, but you will find it shrinks when you get old!!! G.

ba99297
12-11-2014, 11:26 PM
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

EddyCurrent
12-11-2014, 11:28 PM
@ba99297, wrong thread my friend, I've done it myself so no worries.

ba99297
13-11-2014, 08:04 AM
Sorry Eddy!!!

EddyCurrent
18-11-2014, 11:31 PM
Since using the latest Smooth Stepper plugin for several weeks, months ? I've had no problems with homing the X and slaved A drives, I would say that issue is now sorted.
ESS_v10r2d1d.zip

Ger21
19-11-2014, 01:52 AM
And it only took them ~5 years to get it right.

JAZZCNC
19-11-2014, 02:03 AM
And it only took them ~5 years to get it right.

Wouldn't go so far to say got it right but it does work.!

EddyCurrent
07-12-2014, 02:34 PM
Proposed modifications !
This is to allow joints to be cut in the ends of wood, it provides a 'hole' of roughly 200mm square so the wood can be placed in the X or Y planes.
It's based on using this vice guts; http://www.canadiantools.co.uk/tools/Veritas-Tail-Vice-474719.html#SID=50, the rest is made from various types of wood (normal for this type of vice :eagerness:)
Made so it's removable with a replaceable insert to put the bed back to normal.

Pictures show how it looks with vice fully open and fully closed.

139961399713998

I can't have the vice sticking out at the front so the only thing to confirm is whether I can hold a piece of wood in the jaws while tightening the vice.
There's more than enough room above for the spindle and tooling.

Edit:

Would this do instead ?

13999

Wobblycogs
07-12-2014, 06:45 PM
Interesting idea and a good price for that vice if memory serves. I can't help feeling that while I think this will work it's going to be a lot of hassle to set up for the benefit it brings unless you are intending to make a run of identical components. For the joint to be any good you'll need to get the wood bang on parallel with the cutter (in the vertical direction) which will be difficult without a fence which would have to stick down though the table.

I think I'd invest my time in buying a Festool Domino (amazing bit of kit) and if I wanted dovetails a dovetailing jig.

EddyCurrent
07-12-2014, 06:54 PM
Interesting idea and a good price for that vice if memory serves. I can't help feeling that while I think this will work it's going to be a lot of hassle to set up for the benefit it brings unless you are intending to make a run of identical components. For the joint to be any good you'll need to get the wood bang on parallel with the cutter (in the vertical direction) which will be difficult without a fence which would have to stick down though the table.

I think I'd invest my time in buying a Festool Domino (amazing bit of kit) and if I wanted dovetails a dovetailing jig.

Thanks for feedback.

The corner innermost to the machine will be made very accurate so that any wood placed up against it will be vertical in both planes. The whole assembly would be securely fastened to the bed using location points to give repeatable positioning.
Domino's too big for my purpose and also too expensive. Need more joints than just dovetails, the vice would allow wood to be angled at 45 deg. for example.

EddyCurrent
08-12-2014, 07:21 PM
Now commited to current idea having ordered 2 of these; http://www.oxfordweldingsuppliesltd.co.uk/bessey-clamp-gh20

This will be accurate, repeatable, easy to work with, the corner being perpendicular to or at right angles to X,Y,Z planes.

1401314014

Blackrat
08-12-2014, 08:06 PM
Them bessey clamps are amazing !!! Never want to use any other clamp after using them ...

EddyCurrent
08-12-2014, 08:13 PM
Them bessey clamps are amazing !!! Never want to use any other clamp after using them ...

Thanks, that confirms my thinking.

Wobblycogs
08-12-2014, 08:42 PM
You'd be hard pressed to beat Bessey clamps. I've got got some K Body clamps and there's nothing else even close in terms of quality but the price makes your eyes water (although I notice they are doing a sale at the moment). I hope you are going to post a wide selection of pictures of the finished clamping jig. I must admit it crossed my mind to make a similar addition.

EddyCurrent
22-12-2014, 04:53 PM
The completed project is here; http://www.mycncuk.com/threads/8243-Router-Modifications-to-Allow-Cutting-of-Woodworking-Joints?p=65028#post65028

PAULRO
08-02-2015, 08:51 PM
Hi Eddy, i'm about to gather the electrics for my build and would like to use your electric schematics design ( or very close to it )if that's o.k with you. i have wired in the past but nothing on this scale. i have a a few queries you might help me with..........1. if the drives are rated for 80 V DC would i get away with an 80 or 70 V DC power supply?(i'm more than likely going to use a 60 V DC like your self. i'm just curious )
2. if i do use a bigger supply will i have to go with a bigger circuit breaker? ( what determines the size of circuit breaker required?)
i'm trying to get to grips with the safety relay because i never had the pleasure to wire one :dejection: but i would like to have one after reading your blog a few times.

EddyCurrent
08-02-2015, 11:00 PM
1. if the drives are rated for 80 V DC would i get away with an 80 or 70 V DC power supply?(i'm more than likely going to use a 60 V DC like your self. i'm just curious )


You could go higher that 60v but it can rise due to back emf from the stepper motors.


2. if i do use a bigger supply will i have to go with a bigger circuit breaker? ( what determines the size of circuit breaker required?)

The circuit breaker size is related to the current drawn by the system. You need to make sure it's the right type otherwise it will trip every time you power up, type C or D
http://www.neweysonline.co.uk/MCBs/Static.raction


i'm trying to get to grips with the safety relay because i never had the pleasure to wire one :dejection: but i would like to have one after reading your blog a few times.
Ebay is the place to look but first you need to decide this;
1. operating voltage and AC or DC
2. how many contacts you need and are they NO or NC
3. Safety Category of device. If it's for home use then just about any of the devices will be okay.

JoeHarris
15-03-2016, 11:07 PM
There's not a lot of progress to report, but thank you kindly for your support.

It took only a few minutes to remove the meniscus using a course file, because there was 10mm each side of the rail it meant there was no need to get it perfectly flat across the whole width. I did run a bead of liquid nails down each side of the epoxy just to give a nice transition onto the metal.
Got the rails on, one support beam painted, 20mm aluminium gantry support bracket fitted and ballnut bracket attached.
Ball screw temporarily installed just to show actual position. Tried to keep rail and ballscrew in same horizontal plane as much as possible.
I had to regrind some drills to make counter boring tools for the cap head screws.

1158811589115901159111592

Showing end of beam with rail, epoxy, 6mm internal flat bar to give extra thickness for rail mounting screws, glued it in with Gorilla Glue and worked great.
11593

Eddy how did you ensure your x rails were parallel and x and y were 90 degrees to each other??

Boyan Silyavski
16-03-2016, 05:39 AM
Eddy how did you ensure your x rails were parallel and x and y were 90 degrees to each other??


Hi Joe, if you remember i explained it here #151 (http://www.mycncuk.com/threads/6619-Quite-an-Unusual-one?p=67194#post67194) in detail how i did it, if its of any help.

But basically in following order gravity and epoxy did the job in one plane for long rails/y/, gantry legs and using square between them, then for gantry rails/x/. Then 1 gantry rail was mounted and using hardstop/precision cut squared piece of sth/ fixed at same distance to gantry legs plane. Then using dial indicator or hard stop next rail was mounted in parallel.

Now the gantry rails were mounted in parallel to each other and square to legs, was time to square long rails. One rail was mounted within millimeter square to frame. It was straightened using straight edge while tightening. So result was first rail straight and on place. Then crossing with the long straight edge and 2 precision squares, checking every 25cm second rail was mounted. That was the most exhausting job as in my case distance was 1800 between them so very difficult to judge square or not. I started scraping the square against straight edge and unsquaring it left and right, so i wanted to get the feeling when in perfect center/square. Once i felt how it feels i used that feeling to square all.

Then gantry was mounted. Then time for Z. First gantry was squared to long rails. Then using clamps clamped on place. Again the long straight edge cross the long rails below in front of gantry. Using squares between it and z rails, ...


All ball screws were mounted 1 by 1 more or less, screw not tight just to hold a little , so when moved to end they will slide on place. Axis moved by hand to one end. ball screw slides on its place, tighten screws, then repeat at other end. That ensured ball screw alignment to be parallel to rails

JoeHarris
16-03-2016, 11:42 PM
Thanks Boyan, and yes that description was useful. My issue like yours is a lack of specialist kit. I was asking eddy as he has built in aluminium. I am ok where the aluminium is being mounted in such a way as to make the most of the cast sides as these are nice and flat. But the edges are not and neither are they square. Also the ends of the extrusion I have is not quite flat/square so it makes squaring the x and y to each other hard to achieve. I think I have resigned myself to needing a surface plate and some blue and just scrape the parts square. It's the only way I can think of doing it without a mill... Getting the long axis rails parallel scares the crap out of me!

EddyCurrent
23-07-2016, 11:09 PM
Joe,

I thought this explained it, http://www.mycncuk.com/threads/6565-Ready-Steady-Eddy?p=55217#post55217
For the first X rail I used a straight edge to mount it. For the second X rail I used a measurement from the first X rail but in the end I used the Hiwin bearings to line it up.
By moving the gantry back and forth it was easy to find the position of least resistance and the second X rail was tightened down in that position.

Clive S
24-07-2016, 12:25 AM
Big welcome back Eddy you have been missed:beer:

JAZZCNC
25-07-2016, 02:47 PM
Big welcome back Eddy you have been missed:beer:

I'll second that nice to know you haven't popped your clogs . .:beer:

EddyCurrent
05-08-2016, 11:21 AM
Thank you for those kind words.
Since purchasing CamBam I've been stuck on that forum and got back into writing software in the form of plugins.

routercnc
05-08-2016, 12:03 PM
Welcome back Eddy

Would be good to have your input in the thread 'finished builds picture menu'

Thanks

Dragonfly
05-08-2016, 12:44 PM
Thank you for those kind words.
Since purchasing CamBam I've been stuck on that forum and got back into writing software in the form of plugins.
:)
I can confirm that.
Just dropped in to see how things are going at mycncuk.