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View Full Version : Noise issue and worried about it if i have workshop built any views or help please



suesi34e
21-11-2014, 05:48 PM
Hi guys,

I have read various posts on here about noise I am just wonder if another post may throw up some new ideas etc.
It would be great if there is a company out there showcasing two buildings with the same dims one as standard construction and the other with sounddeadening materials used. I am yet to find such a company! I may want to use in time very noisy machinery and I don't want to spend a lot of money having something built if the neighbors are going to complain. Perhaps some of you guys know what DB rating you had before and after a project, doing say x,y andz! I have no fixed methods of a build in mind; size will come down to two things cost and how noisy I expect things to be.

All the best

Suesi

JAZZCNC
22-11-2014, 12:07 AM
Hi Suesi,

I think you may be misunderstanding what's being meant when noise is mentioned in some threads.?

Most are NOT talking about the DB noise of the machine but the Electrical interference "noise" coming from various sources which affect the running of the machine.

Resonance is another term you'll see used and while this is related to machine vibrations etc it's mostly higher frequency resonance which affects motors and drive performance and not how much the machine actually vibrates to the feel or touch.

If I'm wrong then sorry and ignore my ramblings. . . Lol

Regards machine DB noise then most of the noise comes from the spindle/cutting tool and material type. Different materials have higher or lower sound levels and vibrations depending on density, RPM, DOC & Feed rates being cut at etc.
Stiffer machines can cut deeper and faster but make more noise/vibrations so it's not easy to compare DB noise unless like for like machines.

Personally I'd just build the machine you want without worrying about noise and deal with noise if it's an issue by building an enclosure with sound deadening materials to a DB level that's acceptable to you.

suesi34e
22-11-2014, 01:10 AM
Hi Jazz,

Thank you very much for the reply. I was on the right track for a change talking about the DB noise produced i.e. machine start up run down and like you say cutting! I have read on here that someone used polystyrene sheets on the walls. The trouble is say I have half a dozen machines I didn't want to box each in individually but more rely on the workshop to deaden the noise right down. I would like to be pretty sure about noise as we had a complaint about a radio not so long ago and it wasn't even that noisy! I have tried to look for case studies for use of machinery etc but nothing jumps out at me. I imagine noise is a problem that a lot of us have. I am thinking about buying some special foam and having a small scale test. http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/12-x-Studio-Acoustic-Foam-Panel-Tile-Sound-Absorption-Treatment-Wedge-Charcoal-/371195045428?pt=AU_Pro_Audio&hash=item566cf2e634

Many thanks

Suesi

mekanik
22-11-2014, 01:40 AM
Not sure if the foam route is a good option, it works in recording studios but it is going to accumulate sawdust(if machining wood) and this could be a fire risk.
on the boats i used to work on fiberglass was used and this was covered with perforate board, all openings need a good seal also and if your dust extraction equipment is outside i would think the noise would track through the system. you need to do a web search for acoustic insulation companies and get more info, it won't be a cheap operation.
Regards
Mike

charlieuk
22-11-2014, 08:31 AM
I would say the easy place to start would be just to use db plaster board on all the walls and sealing and and ideally double board it staggering the joints if they are stud walls insulate behind in the cavity with Fiberglass wool if not build some wooden frames and stud it out.Its is basically just a very dense type of plater board something like 36kg a sheet and then get or make some extra thick doors with good seals.

mekanik
22-11-2014, 09:58 AM
Have a look here http://www.fermacell.co.uk/#_sub1675
If you give them a ring they will send you the Orange Book and this will give you all the construction techniques for various applications, Fermacell boards are very dense and are designed for soundproofing and fireproofing, i am using it in my house, if you are doing it yourself you can request one man boards these are 1200 x 1200 and relatively easy to handle, also the panels are glued together when you install them and it makes a crackin job.
regards
Mike

suesi34e
22-11-2014, 03:03 PM
Hi mekanik,

Thank you for your views. Fire is a point to consider as is the dust extraction position. I bet what ever I do it want be cheap but I don't want to fall out with the neighbours either.

Many thanks

Suesi

suesi34e
22-11-2014, 03:19 PM
Hi charlieuk,

Thank you for your msg and ideas.

I have thought about the route of stud work and plaster board as it is something I am familiar of, that said I have not used a sound board. The other plus side to that is it is all available in close by. I have know idea about the other ways like special shaped foam tiles and so on. I think like you say some thick doors with good seals would be a must.

Many thanks

Suesi

suesi34e
22-11-2014, 03:24 PM
Thank for the link Mike I had a quick look on the site. I will ask them to send me the Orange Book and have a read. What you say about the boards sounds good I look forward to learning more about them.

Many thanks

Suesi

mekanik
22-11-2014, 04:13 PM
There are links on the Fermacell site for youtube videos that show the whole process, if you use the steel preformed stud system it looks a doddle, you can download the Orange Book from the link i gave you, my installation is a nightmare as i made the mistake of using Celcon Solar blockwork on the internal walls and trying to get a fixing is a mare, as you can't apply any weight on the screws or they just start rotating, so for any chance of a decent fix all the battens have to be re machined to get them parallel straight and square then lubricate the screw and softly softly till it hardens up but no more.
Regards
Mike

mitchejc
22-11-2014, 06:07 PM
If its brick wall don't worry to much about covering them, no sound produced by any machine is likely to to penetrate it with much energy left unless the sound source is applied directly to the wall e.g. drilling into the wall with a hammer drill. If you are on a budget then something like old carpet + underfelt inside the ceiling between the trusses will makes a good difference. The basic idea is to get things as air tight as possible and damping where you cannot make it air tight. Think along the lines of how well modern cars are sound proofed.

suesi34e
22-11-2014, 06:53 PM
Thank for the msg Mike. It is handy to know of your issues and I am glad you got it right, I bet it will be worth it in the end. I will watch the Youtube videos for sure and download the book.

Many thanks

Suesi

suesi34e
22-11-2014, 06:59 PM
Hi michejc,

Thanks for the views and tips I have lots of thinking to do. If I have the workshop built I want it done well so I would spend a reasonable amount and just do it once.

Many thanks

Suesi

Rogue
03-05-2015, 05:27 PM
Apologies for being late to the party, but if you want some interesting reading on sound reduction, check this link:

http://downloads.bbc.co.uk/rd/pubs/reports/1991-09.pdf

The BBC have put a lot of time into investigating lightweight sound reduction ideas. They're looking at it from the perspective of recording studios rather than workshops but, if you don't mind it getting a bit technical, the PDF linked might give you a better idea of some of the considerations involved.

Jester
05-05-2015, 07:34 PM
A while back while i was working in a the depths of an RFA Vessel. We got to thinking about noise reduction or even noise cancelling. We tried a few methods and was semi successfull use a mike and a laptop output the opposite noise. In a small ish place it could work quite well. The computer would in realtime monitor the noise created and output the opposite noise to cancel it out. If i can find the software i used ill post it up.

I know its slightly ott and probably not worth the time, but for al diyers its a great little project.

The principle is that the software generates a inverted sound, essentially cancelling out the sound around you.

suesi34e
08-05-2015, 12:06 AM
Hi Rogue,

Many thanks for your msg and the link it sounds interesting and I shall have a look.

All the best

Suesi


Apologies for being late to the party, but if you want some interesting reading on sound reduction, check this link:

http://downloads.bbc.co.uk/rd/pubs/reports/1991-09.pdf

The BBC have put a lot of time into investigating lightweight sound reduction ideas. They're looking at it from the perspective of recording studios rather than workshops but, if you don't mind it getting a bit technical, the PDF linked might give you a better idea of some of the considerations involved.

suesi34e
08-05-2015, 12:11 AM
Hi Jester,

Many thanks for your msg. I have to say I have not heard of noise cancelation software. I am glad you did not send your msg on April fools day or I may not have given it much thought.
I will have to have a look into how much difference the software can make but it sounds good in theory! I would love to know what software you used and an example of the success you had.

All the best

Suesi