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View Full Version : Workshop Stoves now winter's here



EddyCurrent
09-12-2014, 08:42 PM
I bought one of these stoves a few years ago and it's been great and still going strong, burns wood and sawdust safely in the workshop and the heat output is huge. I used a piece of single wall flue pipe from the stove then went to double skin stainless as it passed through the roof and out, cowl fitted to top.
Highly recommended; http://tecnikstoves.co.uk/

gavztheouch
09-12-2014, 10:45 PM
Nice stove. I am living in a static caravan right now and I'm trying to install a wood burner inside. I'm going with one length of single skin and then onto double insulated. How tall did you make your flue?

magicniner
09-12-2014, 11:02 PM
I have an oil filled electric job with the thermostat set as low as it will go and still come on now & again, the first frosty morning has confirmed the worth of insulation and boarding out ;-)

- Nick

Blackrat
10-12-2014, 05:39 AM
I'd love one if those wood burners .... There is a saw mill next door to me and the amount of excess wood is ridiculous ! Never mind the mounds of bags of saw dust ...

But shipping a hunk of steel like that to Africa !!
Wonder if you can install a heat exchange and run underfloor heating ;-)

EddyCurrent
10-12-2014, 11:41 AM
Nice stove. I am living in a static caravan right now and I'm trying to install a wood burner inside. I'm going with one length of single skin and then onto double insulated. How tall did you make your flue?

3 metres + height of stove + cowl. It could do with another 1/2 metre though just to clear the roof ridge.

Blackrat
11-12-2014, 07:26 AM
Eddy ...

fancy doing a rough sketch of a burner ? :D

EddyCurrent
11-12-2014, 09:02 AM
Eddy ...

fancy doing a rough sketch of a burner ? :D

I could but it would be improper, I will though give this link for a similar but more expensive stove that describes the things you need to know; http://www.workshopstoves.co.uk/Oakfire1-workshop-stove.asp
It talks about a tube that goes nearly to the bottom of the fire so that intake air comes in at the bottom and blows up through the fuel to the chimney. The flap at the top of this tube is the 'throttle'

gavztheouch
11-12-2014, 09:34 AM
3 metres + height of stove + cowl. It could do with another 1/2 metre though just to clear the roof ridge.

Great I have 3m of flue so I should be ok. I think the recommend minimum on any stove is over 4m.

EddyCurrent
11-12-2014, 10:04 AM
Also it's a 5" pipe and the 'draw' is strong so that I have to run it on 1/2 throttle otherwise it would melt. :cheerful:

Blackrat
11-12-2014, 12:56 PM
im just interested in how it burns the sawdust .... as that link you sent mentions, the stove can overheat if the sawdust isnt compressed first ..

Clive S
11-12-2014, 01:57 PM
Didn't it say shavings have to be pressed down? ..Clive

njhussey
11-12-2014, 02:10 PM
If you do a bit of googling or rocket stoves you'll see plenty of YouTube videos on this. It burns on the surface of the compacted sawdust, its compacted to stop it from burning too hot (too much air between the sawdust particles)

EddyCurrent
11-12-2014, 04:52 PM
The stove I linked to in the first post isn't exactly a rocket stove, it's just that the intake air is directed from the top surface, through the throttle plate, then down to the bottom of the stove via a square tube. I think this is mainly to keep it fully eclosed and spark free for workshop applications. There's no hearth as a consequence, just the bottom of the box, so it's recommended to keep a layer of ash in the bottom to protect the metal.
I only tried sawdust once, it worked okay but there was too much pongy fumes outside for my liking so now I just burn logs and you can't even see any smoke.

vargai
11-12-2014, 08:21 PM
me interested too how it works-a friend of mine have more then enough big bag with dust and simply put it into a furnace originally design for straw bale -looking for other option
Have you got sketch or section with principle?
Edit: I left some post -already see the link, thanks