1. #1
    Hello All, I want to start developing my own CNC machine and I found different designs in the internet.
    I want to know how to choose the best design and why should every design be better in some field.
    I want to read more about this and need your help
    Thanks

  2. #2
    Lee Roberts's Avatar
    Lives in Wigan, United Kingdom. Current Activity: Viewing Moderator Control Panel Has been a member for 9-10 years. Has a total post count of 2,545. Received thanks 161 times, giving thanks to others 652 times. Made a monetary donation to the upkeep of the community. Referred 10 members to the community.
    Post the designs your considering as options?

    What is your chosen field?

    .Me
    .Me

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by Lee Roberts View Post
    Post the designs your considering as options?

    What is your chosen field?

    .Me
    I need comparison to choose, My field is Computer and Control
    Sorry if i didn't understand your question well

  4. #4
    Lee Roberts's Avatar
    Lives in Wigan, United Kingdom. Current Activity: Viewing Moderator Control Panel Has been a member for 9-10 years. Has a total post count of 2,545. Received thanks 161 times, giving thanks to others 652 times. Made a monetary donation to the upkeep of the community. Referred 10 members to the community.
    Quote Originally Posted by ammaratef45 View Post
    I need comparison to choose, My field is Computer and Control
    Sorry if i didn't understand your question well
    Np, you said you found designs on the Internet? Share/post these designs for us to review ?

    What materials do you want to cut with your new machine?

    Do you want help choosing a machine or just advice on the structure of a machine?

    .Me
    Last edited by Lee Roberts; 18-07-2016 at 12:08 PM.
    .Me

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  6. #5
    Each machine is designed to cut different types and sizes of materials. For example:

    1) Engraving small objects -
    Type: Fixed gantry, moving bed
    Movement: Ballscrew, Leadscrew, or direct belt
    Feedrate: Low
    Stiffness: Low
    Rails: Supported round
    Accuracy: Low

    2) Large wood or plastic sheets -
    Type: Moving gantry with side legs
    Movement: Ballscrew, or more likely rack & pinion (size and feed makes ballscrews less desired)
    Feedrate: High (to cut properly and prevent burning)
    Stiffness: Medium
    Rails: Supported round, or profile rail
    Accuracy: Medium

    3) Large aluminium parts-
    Type: Moving gantry with raised X-axis (no side legs on gantry)
    Movement: Ballscrews
    Feedrate: Medium
    Stiffness: High
    Rails: Profile rail
    Accuracy: Fairly high

    4) Small aluminium/steel parts -
    Type: Fixed gantry, moving bed
    Movement: Ballscrews
    Feedrate: Medium
    Stiffness: Very high
    Rails: Profile Rail
    Accuracy: High
    (or convert a milling machine to CNC)

    You can argue the details for the above but the point is that depending on what you want to cut, how big it is, etc. it will have conflicting requirements. That is why there are so many different machines out there. If you use a machine to cut a different part to which it was designed it will either be slow, dull the cutter, or not give the accuracy you need.

    As Lee says, tell us the sizes and materials you want to cut and that will help narrow down the best options.
    Last edited by routercnc; 18-07-2016 at 05:57 PM.
    Building a CNC machine to make a better one since 2010 . . .
    MK1 (1st photo), MK2, MK3, MK4

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  8. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by routercnc View Post
    Each machine is designed to cut different types and sizes of materials. For example:

    1) Engraving small objects -
    Type: Fixed gantry, moving bed
    Movement: Ballscrew, Leadscrew, or direct belt
    Feedrate: Low
    Stiffness: Low
    Rails: Supported round
    Accuracy: Low

    2) Large wood or plastic sheets -
    Type: Moving gantry with side legs
    Movement: Ballscrew, or more likely rack & pinion (size and feed makes ballscrews less desired)
    Feedrate: High (to cut properly and prevent burning)
    Stiffness: Medium
    Rails: Supported round, or profile rail
    Accuracy: Medium

    3) Large aluminium parts-
    Type: Moving gantry with raised X-axis (no side legs on gantry)
    Movement: Ballscrews
    Feedrate: Medium
    Stiffness: High
    Rails: Profile rail
    Accuracy: Fairly high

    4) Small aluminium/steel parts -
    Type: Fixed gantry, moving bed
    Movement: Ballscrews
    Feedrate: Medium
    Stiffness: Very high
    Rails: Profile Rail
    Accuracy: High
    (or convert a milling machine to CNC)

    You can argue the details for the above but the point is that depending on what you want to cut, how big it is, etc. it will have conflicting requirements. That is why there are so many different machines out there. If you use a machine to cut a different part to which it was designed it will either be slow, dull the cutter, or not give the accuracy you need.

    As Lee says, tell us the sizes and materials you want to cut and that will help narrow down the best options.
    Great that help me start, I will come back to you guys if I had been stuck again

  9. #7
    Tell us what you will use it for, cause there are many hybrid designs and variations also. Apart from that you will have to understand that machine frame, motor and driver choice, linear movement parts are inter dependent and must be chosen at the same time. Not build frame then choose motors...
    project 1 , 2, Dust Shoe ...

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