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  1. #31
    Quote Originally Posted by JAZZCNC View Post
    Jazz style response not sure I like sound of that. . .Lol

    Anyway I think the answer is obvious but all of you have failed to RTFM.!!! . . . . . With 3.5A motor current set resistor isn't required.

    However I'd still throw that switched mode supply away and build one.!. . . . As well not RTFM you didn't RTFF . . . Because you'd seen said many times NEVER BUY KIT.!! . .

    EDIT: Just seen this.!!!!!!!



    You don't want 50v or even 48V because the Geckos are only rated 50Vdc so doesn't leave big enoigh safety margin. You will KILL the drives quickly if run at this voltage.
    44Vdc is about high as would run these drives from safety point of view. The 4-5v differnence will hardly be noticable in performance terms but the Smell of magic smoke will be.!!

    If you want higher performance then sell the drives and use 80Vdc Digital drives with 70Vdc and then you'll see difference.! . . .Big one.!!

    Gecko's are living on there reputation from years ago but sadly today they are behind in the Digital race.


    I have read the manual, the drive IS DESIGNED to be operated at 50Volts, and already has a 10 volt buffer - it works up to 60 Volts.

    I have measures the input voltage and current on the switch mode power and it is rock stable at 48/50/46/42 volts, whatever I set with the resistor

    The total system current draw is only around 2.6 to 3.3 Amps - when I hooked it up to my 30 Volt power supply

  2. Ignoring Voltage/Power supply discussions, what is the actual fault you are seeing?

    Do the motors stop/stall, the drives fault out...?
    Avoiding the rubbish customer service from AluminiumWarehouse since July '13.

  3. #33
    Quote Originally Posted by m_c View Post
    Ignoring Voltage/Power supply discussions, what is the actual fault you are seeing?

    Do the motors stop/stall, the drives fault out...?
    It's reading the CNC code, then the Gecko unit fault light somes on and that disabled everything

    Is seems to happen a lot more - the higher the voltage I set on the switch mode power supply, I thought I had it working on the 42Volt setting, which is the lowest possible, but it stopped 3-4 times around the same area in the workpiece today

    I tried to re-do it at slow speed, with slower accelerations and it still stopped - it's not jamming, it's running at about 30% of the jamming speed, it's being turned off because Gecko is giving a fault for some reason. the CNC program is still happily running in the background sending commands out

    I switched over to another lower 30 Volt switched power supply that is also half the power ( 300 Watt ) , and I've had to slow down the motors and accelerations even more, as it's now almost half the efficient voltage I need. It seems to be getting through the job, although I had a few missed steps due to high loading at times during the cut sequence - so I've reduced the speed/accel even more

    I don't know if it's a power problem, or a geckodrive current draw issue, or voltage issue - mystified
    Last edited by dachopper; 03-02-2017 at 12:09 PM.

  4. My guess is you have a noise problem, which is made worse by the higher voltage.

    I've just had a quick scan of the G540 manual. How have you connected pin 10 and 12 on the G540? Have you tried connecting them with just a short bit wire?

    The G540 uses 4 G250s internally, which don't have any form of fault output, so an individual axis fault should not cause the G540 fault light to come on.
    Avoiding the rubbish customer service from AluminiumWarehouse since July '13.

  5. #35
    Quote Originally Posted by m_c View Post
    My guess is you have a noise problem, which is made worse by the higher voltage.

    I've just had a quick scan of the G540 manual. How have you connected pin 10 and 12 on the G540? Have you tried connecting them with just a short bit wire?

    The G540 uses 4 G250s internally, which don't have any form of fault output, so an individual axis fault should not cause the G540 fault light to come on.

    I've got a wire - about 2 foot long which is connecting them both together, I'll have a go - and shorten it right up, but I doubt this is the issue, then again, the + and _ wires run right next to this wire at the G540 box. -I heard there was some form of overvoltage protection, so I assumed that was what was faulting.


    Wow - I just found this thread..

    Guy has exactly the same motors as me, and the same fault.

    http://www.cnczone.com/forums/gecko-...connected.html

  6. #36
    Quote Originally Posted by dachopper View Post
    I have read the manual, the drive IS DESIGNED to be operated at 50Volts, and already has a 10 volt buffer - it works up to 60 Volts.
    Well that's news to me and I've fitted quite few now.! . . . Think you should read again because in the manual on Gecko web site which I've just been reading to make sure things haven't chenged there are still big warnings about NOT exceeding 50Vdc.!! . . . Which with 48Vdc you will get above with back EMF.

  7. #37
    Quote Originally Posted by dachopper View Post
    Wow - I just found this thread..

    Guy has exactly the same motors as me, and the same fault.

    http://www.cnczone.com/forums/gecko-...connected.html
    But they fixed the problem in their G540 4 years ago. Is your Gecko that old?

  8. #38
    Quote Originally Posted by JAZZCNC View Post
    Well that's news to me and I've fitted quite few now.! . . . Think you should read again because in the manual on Gecko web site which I've just been reading to make sure things haven't chenged there are still big warnings about NOT exceeding 50Vdc.!! . . . Which with 48Vdc you will get above with back EMF.
    ....

    You can't possibly expect a consumer, to read a manual that says use less than 50 Volts, then they purchase a power supply that inputs' less than 48 Volts, even 42 volts, and then say, oy you didn't factory in the manufacturers back EMF effect - there is no mention of this anywhere - but there is mention of of the formula to calculate the ideal voltage, and that is close to 50 volts.

    I don' think this is the issue - sounds like I have one of the units with the current set resistor at 8 amps, and because of my application, the overcurrent protection circuit is going off.

    Shame because I was told in 2016 by automation tech that they were selling me one of the latest models.... and after reading the 2012 post, they knew about this 4 years ago?

    If this is what the problem is..... it sounds absolutely identical to the behaviour I am seeing

  9. #39
    Quote Originally Posted by dachopper View Post
    sounds like I have one of the units with the current set resistor at 8 amps, and because of my application, the overcurrent protection circuit is going off.

    Shame because I was told in 2016 by automation tech that they were selling me one of the latest models.... and after reading the 2012 post, they knew about this 4 years ago?

    If this is what the problem is..... it sounds absolutely identical to the behaviour I am seeing
    It would be easy to check the value of the resistorryou have in the short-circuit protection. But only if they will tell you where to look and for what value.

    The posts from #56 to #60 are interesting ...Like politicians answering a press conference.

  10. #40
    Quote Originally Posted by dachopper View Post
    ....

    You can't possibly expect a consumer, to read a manual that says use less than 50 Volts, then they purchase a power supply that inputs' less than 48 Volts, even 42 volts, and then say, oy you didn't factory in the manufacturers back EMF effect - there is no mention of this anywhere - but there is mention of of the formula to calculate the ideal voltage, and that is close to 50 volts.
    They expect the person fitting the unit to be competent or experienced enough to factor in that certain amount of Back Emf will be produced. It's common knowledge even at DIY level that safety factor is required which is often advised being around 10% less than Max rated voltage.

    It's dangerous and foolish to assume that any manufacturer as built in "safety" factor and then Ignore the Warning Given in the Same Manufacturers Manual.!!

    It's even MORE FOOLISH to thentry an Rubbish what someone with years of experience is telling you will happen if you run at those Voltages.

    Now I should tell you to get stuffed you arrogant "Aussie Bastard" but in the spirit of helping people then I'll just say. Gecko after sales service is legendary so Contact Gecko tell them you your issue and they Will replace/repair the unit for you.

    Oh and the Voltage Calculation is just that.? A Calculation based on the Motors parameters and should be used has guide line for Motor Voltage and doesn't mean just because your motor specs calculates that 50V is ideal voltage you can run at this voltage on the drives.!!

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