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  1. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by magicniner View Post
    I'm a "material removal" kind of guy but I do fancy a fiddle with 3D printing, there are things I could usefully make where tensile strength and surface finish aren't major issues but I'd prefer to buy a complete kit to play with initially as time is something of which I don't have much spare.
    I'd welcome suggestions based on actual experience, including things to avoid.
    I'm thinking that if I go for something with a full aluminium frame I will at least have a base worth improving upon at a later date,

    - Nick
    The Prusa MK2 mechanically made me laugh when i received it, but in reality it prints 24h non stop without a glitch. Its a well thought printer, but cheap to make printer. Its growling and making noise 10x as much as my CNC makes but it works and prints nicely. I could sit down and change that design to Hiwin rails, but thats their job to do, not mine, so i will not do it.

    I dont know of a well thought printer thats mechanically sound. Maybe the Raise3d. What i dont like of that type of printers is that taking off the ready piece from the bed will do a lot of twisting and bending of all the frame and bed.

    Again -- best deal for the money is the Steel Prusa from what i see around for cheap. Due to the quality components used. The electronics i mean.
    project 1 , 2, Dust Shoe ...

  2. #22
    Click image for larger version. 

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    The only way to tell is by extreme close up. This is 0.2mm layers of ABS Plus on a printer that has the folded steel frame and profile rails.

    Show is what you've got

  3. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by Boyan Silyavski View Post

    I dont know of a well thought printer thats mechanically sound. Maybe the Raise3d. What i dont like of that type of printers is that taking off the ready piece from the bed will do a lot of twisting and bending of all the frame and bed.
    The Raise3D pack a lot of tech in a very well priced package and prints like a dream. Most of the larger machines will allow you to remove the printer bed, all you need to do then is stick it in the freezer for a few minutes and the print pops off.
    https://emvioeng.com
    Machine tools and 3D printing supplies. Expanding constantly.

  4. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by komatias View Post
    The Raise3D pack a lot of tech in a very well priced package and prints like a dream. Most of the larger machines will allow you to remove the printer bed, all you need to do then is stick it in the freezer for a few minutes and the print pops off.
    Agree with that. What i said was a simplification of the facts. Its handy to have a couple of top plates to change. Furthermore i remember somebody proved that the glass on top of aluminum is not a problem and will not lead to losses and cold spots. Still, if one forgets or learns,prints flat PETG part - could trash the glass. Also plate could be PEI, which will eliminate said problem, but will be more expensive to have a couple of them so thick.
    project 1 , 2, Dust Shoe ...

  5. #25
    I've ordered a kit from a UK supplier, it's a 6mm aluminium frame rather than acrylic so hopefully it should be at least a decent starting point :D

    - Nick
    You think that's too expensive? You're not a Model Engineer are you? :D

  6. #26
    m_c's Avatar
    Lives in East Lothian, United Kingdom. Last Activity: 8 Hours Ago Has been a member for 9-10 years. Has a total post count of 2,123. Received thanks 233 times, giving thanks to others 5 times.
    Nick, what kit have you ordered?

    I'm in a similar situation. I'd like a 3D printer, as it would be handy for a few odds and ends, but I don't really have the time to research/build/learn/tweak a 3D printer.
    Avoiding the rubbish customer service from AluminiumWarehouse since July '13.

  7. #27
    It's the one from Factory 3D in Newcastle-upon-Tyne ( http://factory3d.co.uk/ ). I'm sure there will be bits that I re-make, replace or re-engineer as I go along but I really like the idea of an aluminium main frame and a UK manufactured kit.

    - Nick
    You think that's too expensive? You're not a Model Engineer are you? :D

  8. #28
    m_c's Avatar
    Lives in East Lothian, United Kingdom. Last Activity: 8 Hours Ago Has been a member for 9-10 years. Has a total post count of 2,123. Received thanks 233 times, giving thanks to others 5 times.
    That looks like quite a good kit. It'll be good to see how you get on with it, and what you mod along the way.
    Avoiding the rubbish customer service from AluminiumWarehouse since July '13.

  9. #29
    I finally got my Graber I3 frame from Ukraine took about a month to arrive. I'm going to beef it up with metal corner brackets and modify it to take 8mm lead screws for the z axis instead of 5mm threaded bar.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Anyone with access to a cnc could easily make their own Prusa style frame from ply, mdf or aluminium.

    I am upgrading a reprap mendal, will have to cut 4 of the smooth rods to fit. Not looking forward to cutting the stainless steel z axis rods.

    I need to get an lcd for my ramps at some point but the cnc build is killing me financially so it can wait it's no hassle to print from my laptop.

    One thing if using windows you have to make sure automatic updates are off, power saving and anything that might put the pc to sleep or reboot it must be disabled. In Linux this is not so much an issue but you can configure a windows pc fine. I use a windows pc for timelapse that's been on for months with no issues.

    I'm going to plug the printer into a 1kw UPS (Just because I have one spare) so will have a little extra protection but not essential.
    Last edited by Desertboy; 07-05-2017 at 12:24 AM.
    http://www.mycncuk.com/threads/10880...60cm-work-area My first CNC build WIP 120cm*80cm

    If you didn't buy it from China the company you bought it from did ;)

  10. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by Desertboy View Post
    I'm going to beef it up with metal corner brackets .
    Would you be better with more traditional methods for a wood frame?
    Wood corner braces bonded in place with Cascamite, or even Gorilla Glue might provide more rigid triangulation over a larger area than metal brackets.
    Pinned and glued is almost always superior to metal brackets and bolts and screws with structural wood projects.

    - Nick
    You think that's too expensive? You're not a Model Engineer are you? :D

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