Thread: G2Core & GOKO

  1. #1
    Kitwn's Avatar
    Lives in Exmouth, Australia. Last Activity: 2 Weeks Ago Has been a member for 0-1 years. Has a total post count of 7. Received thanks 1 times, giving thanks to others 1 times.
    I've been using LinuxCNC quite happily for a few years now but want to get away from needing a dedicated PC in my very small workshop, especially one requiring an antiquated parallel port. I've also found that the pulse timing from this machine, as with any controller relying on a conventional operating system to calculate when the pulses should occur, to be less than perfect and I'd like to see what improvements to noise and vibration I can get from a dedicated controller card able to produce accurately timed pulses. The plan is to have a small board built into the motor-controller box (suitably screened!) which I can talk to via USB with my lap-top when required, thus freeing up precious bench space when I'm not actually making chips.

    Not being one to spend more money than I have to, my chosen hardware/software solution is the G2Core software from Synthetos running on an Arduino DUE board for the controller itself and GOKO as the software to handle sending it G-code and other operating instructions. A breakout board from Djuke.nl sits on the Due to connect the motor drivers, limit switches etc. All the software is available free and the Arduino Due board (or a clone thereof) and the breakout can be bought for only a few tens of dollars each. Links are below.

    The G2Core software is an offshoot of the software Sythetos use for their TinyG controller board. The TinyG isn't suitable for my needs and the new software is too advanced for the TinyG itself to run, having some very advanced acceleration behaviour intended to reduce jerkiness even at increased speed. This is explained further in the wiki link below. Unfortunately this software is very much a work in progress and there is no one-size-fits-all package you can easily download and install. Part of the reason for starting this thread is to catalogue my progress in making a working controller for my cnc router and hopefully make it easier for others to follow me. I will undoubtedly be asking for help as well.

    The linked video shows where I'm up to (I couldn't get a direct link to work but the URL is below). I'll be adding more details about the G2Core software and how to get it working later. Goko has some features dedicated for use with G2Core which is why I chose it.

    Kit

    https://goko.fr/
    https://github.com/synthetos/g2/wiki
    https://www.djuke.nl/en/products?pag...product_id=406
    Last edited by Kitwn; 09-04-2018 at 07:44 AM.

  2. #2
    I've been using LinuxCNC quite happily for a few years now but want to get away from needing a dedicated PC in my very small workshop, especially one requiring an antiquated parallel port. I've also found that the pulse timing from this machine, as with any controller relying on a conventional operating system to calculate when the pulses should occur, to be less than perfect and I'd like to see what improvements to noise and vibration I can get from a dedicated controller card able to produce accurately timed pulses.
    I am not sure why you sure why knocking linuxcnc saying that it "especially one requiring an antiquated parallel port" as that is not true. Stick any Mesa card in it and you will have pulse timing as fast and accurate as you will need. If you want Ethernet connected card then use a 7i76e card.

    There are plenty of options for other motion controllers as well
    ..Clive
    The more you know, The better you know, How little you know

  3. #3
    Kitwn's Avatar
    Lives in Exmouth, Australia. Last Activity: 2 Weeks Ago Has been a member for 0-1 years. Has a total post count of 7. Received thanks 1 times, giving thanks to others 1 times.
    Clive,
    Ah yes, but I'm a cheapskate. $270AUD plus delivery is a lot of money!

    Part of the attraction of the G2Core project is trying out the reduced 'jerk' in the motion that it claims to have thanks to the complex acceleration calculations. How much of a real difference to anything useful this makes is, as yet, unknown, but that's half the fun. One of my reasons for making a CNC machine in the first place was just to see if I could. Even though I have since found plenty of things to make with it, there's still an element of that childish experimentation in the upgrades and changes I'm making.

    Kit

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