1. #1
    i am working on a hand tool design. it's going to be a wood & metal handle. i have attached an example.

    as you can see with the handtools examples (screwdrivers) i am looking to achieve this look. they look to be hand-made.

    i want the quality to resemble the typical kitchen knife handles of some manufacturers - example also attached.

    i have no machining experience - so naturally, i have some questions.

    are there one-stops machine shops that can create this design? or will i have to contact both a metal shop & wood shop?

    does anyone have a recommendation for a manufacturer in europe that can provide this service? possible a kife manufactures? - seeing that i want the design to have this look & finish!

    lastly - the finished product may be oocassionaly tossed into a dishwasher. does anyone recommended what types of adhesives for the metal/wood - can tolerate this abuse?

    thanks in advance!
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  2. #2
    Ensure you get your own Non Disclosure agreement signed by any company you allow to see your actual design, if it's innovative and not obvious and you don't want it copied.
    Most of what you show are forged metal, machined in some way to finish, and with the wood shaped to fit in, metal removal is not a good choice for production of such items unless the resale value is high (look at the size of rectangular metal block to make it from, everything else has to be machined away whilst being able to hold it firmly enough to machine it).

    - Nick
    You think that's too expensive? You're not a Model Engineer are you? :D

  3. #3
    hey nick -

    thanks for the advice. indeed, the size of the metal block is something i really need to consider concering design and cost (thanks for pointing that out.)

    and now i need to sort out a non-disclosure agreement.

    Quote Originally Posted by magicniner View Post
    Ensure you get your own Non Disclosure agreement signed by any company you allow to see your actual design, if it's innovative and not obvious and you don't want it copied.
    Most of what you show are forged metal, machined in some way to finish, and with the wood shaped to fit in, metal removal is not a good choice for production of such items unless the resale value is high (look at the size of rectangular metal block to make it from, everything else has to be machined away whilst being able to hold it firmly enough to machine it).

    - Nick

  4. #4
    what about the joining of metal & wood? is there an adhesive you can recommend that would work for both materials and stand up to abuse from the dishwasher?

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by JEK5019 View Post
    what about the joining of metal & wood? is there an adhesive you can recommend that would work for both materials and stand up to abuse from the dishwasher?
    That's quite a tough one in my experience, not only do you need an adhesive that will stand the temperature and cleaning agents in the dishwasher, but there's the differential expansion between the wood and metal due to temperature and moisture. I remember doing a repair on a wooden handled kitchen implement using epoxy and it lasted about 18 months of semi-regular use, but then parted from the metal. A phenolic adhesive might be your best bet, though the good resins need heat to cure them. And make sure you're using a type of wood that doesn't absorb moisture too readily (likely a very close grained hardwood). Or use the little brass rivet things - there's probably a good reason why they're popular
    Last edited by Voicecoil; 5 Days Ago at 10:58 PM.

  6. #6
    thanks voicecoil -

    good info.. yea - makes sense regarding the varying temps - something to keep in mind.

    as far as those rivets go - i've already looked into that. metal inserts like these...

    https://www.amazon.com/stores/page/8...eb_12215015011

    i've watched a few videos where an epoxy is applied - but again - these videos are not for knifes generally tossed into the dishwasher. as the wood to metal alone isn't enough - eventaully the water and temparutre will probably make the wood bend/bow from the metal.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CPRRK34v_Kw

    i think i need to source a shop that's produced work for a high kitchen knife maker - as their seams are spot on & beautiful. like the attached. and i imagine some consumers will use them in a dishwasher - though it's not recommended.

    Quote Originally Posted by Voicecoil View Post
    That's quite a tough one in my experience, not only do you need an adhesive that will stand the temperature and cleaning agents in the dishwasher, but there's the differential expansion between the wood and metal due to temperature and moisture. I remember doing a repair on a wooden handled kitchen implement using epoxy and it lasted about 18 months of semi-regular use, but then parted from the metal. A phenolic adhesive might be your best bet, though the good resins need heat to cure them. And make sure you're using a type of wood that doesn't absorb moisture too readily (likely a very close grained hardwood). Or use the little brass rivet things - there's probably a good reason why they're popular
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    Last edited by JEK5019; 4 Days Ago at 10:26 AM.

  7. #7
    m_c's Avatar
    Lives in East Lothian, United Kingdom. Last Activity: 2 Hours Ago Forum Superstar, has done so much to help others, they deserve a medal. Has been a member for 9-10 years. Has a total post count of 2,231. Received thanks 245 times, giving thanks to others 6 times.
    The joins are only perfect when new.

    The wood eventually moves and gaps/cracks do open up, but they get filled with dirt/grime while being used/washed, which gets hidden by using dark wood.

    My mum has a wooden handled set of knifes that must be over 40 year old, and you don't want to look too closely at the handles if dirt upsets you!
    Avoiding the rubbish customer service from AluminiumWarehouse since July '13.

  8. #8
    yea - that makes sense. it seems most wood handles for kitchen knives happen to be dark. guess i'll stick with dark wood.

    thanks.

    Quote Originally Posted by m_c View Post
    The joins are only perfect when new.

    The wood eventually moves and gaps/cracks do open up, but they get filled with dirt/grime while being used/washed, which gets hidden by using dark wood.

    My mum has a wooden handled set of knifes that must be over 40 year old, and you don't want to look too closely at the handles if dirt upsets you!

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