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  1. #1
    good day -

    first off! i am not a machinist - so you will have to be a bt forgiving.

    i have a dilemma - i am working on this design - and the intent is that the (green) cylinder is to freely roll when applied to a surface (like a pizza cutter.)

    however - the binding barrel (blue) i sourced out at mcmaster-carr - i do not want to rotate. and i certainly donít want to too tight as it will start to bend the channel.

    itís also critical that the ends have no drive - but a nice polished-finished look.

    maybe an adhesive?

    i came across google images - where i can see a binding barrel with a hex at the base (like a carriage bolt) i think this would work - right?

    but i imagine itís easy to drill the hole in the channel - but the hex shape not so?

    so i am at a loss.

    if you look at the reference in the yellow circle - the bolt is normally welded and then sanded off. i donīt like this look. (unless thereís a machine shop that could perform this with a better finish?)

    what are my options in achieving this function?

    best regards -

    jůn
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  3. #2
    We'll call the "Binding Bolt" the "Axle" and call the bolt which retains it the "Bolt"
    Simply make the hole in your channel to clear the Axle at one side and the bolt at the other, the axle will insert through one side of the channel and sit against the other, the retaining bolt will tighten and retain the axle without pulling the channel together.
    Use a chuck or collet chuck to hold the axle end still and to tighten the bolt, a little medium strength locktite on the bolt thread will ensure it does not work loose.
    You think that's too expensive? You're not a Model Engineer are you? :D

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  5. #3
    ah! that's brilliant - thank you!

    back to design

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  7. #4
    okay -

    once critical detail, however - and that is hoping to have no drive at either end.

    i came across this binding barrel that is press-fit. but i doubt that'll provide enough tension to hold in place.

    also - if i decide to use a binding barrel with a drive head - i would prefer to be a thin head - but all the heads i looked at are bulky.

    i'm using mcmaster-car / are there any other manufacturers that you can recommend?

    cheers -

    jůn

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  9. #5
    Make your own axles for your product, it's fairly basic lathe work.
    You think that's too expensive? You're not a Model Engineer are you? :D

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  11. #6
    i'm sure it is - however, this is a small smart in an overall design i am working on - if the design proves to be successful - i'll be needing to make approximately several thousand pieces easily!

    custom work at that level wouldn't prove cost effective - so i am trying to manage ready-made assets, if possible.

  12. #7
    You need to step away from your fixation on a fastener designed for easy use in non-engineering applications, they don't make threaded Chicago Screws without driver slots because they need to be user friendly for their intended purpose, holding together books, material sample swatches etc.
    Use a length of tube with two press-in ends.
    You think that's too expensive? You're not a Model Engineer are you? :D

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  14. #8
    indeed.

    my primary concern is movement. is there an epoxy that i can use where the tube meets the channel?

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  16. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by JEK5019 View Post
    indeed.

    my primary concern is movement. is there an epoxy that i can use where the tube meets the channel?
    To do what? You don't have the area to securely bond the tube to the channel with epoxy so why would you want to put epoxy there?
    Tube
    Holes in the channel the same size as the tube ID.
    Hammer Drive Screws
    Job done.
    You think that's too expensive? You're not a Model Engineer are you? :D

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  18. #10
    A peen, aka pin punch on one corner of the flat blue bolt flat area will mostly lock it in place.
    This can be done in an inside-supporting fixture, think fork, avoiding distorting the U shaped hold.

    Any industrial epoxy will fix the blue bolt, depending on load and the size of the end plate surface area.

    A fast small drill through the holding bolt edge (blue), and a pin, punched, would also work.
    So would e.g. blind pop rivets.

    Press-fit barrels would definitely work.
    Both for holding them, and the ends pressed in.
    They need precise holes for press-fit purposes.
    Think reamed to 0.01 mm in D, more or less.

    Typical std reamer accuracy (0.01 mm in smallish D), easy to do, cheap, fast.

    Custom barrels are probably much cheaper than anything like that from mcmaster in qty 3000 units.

    Typically, mcmaster/misumi/etc cost 1-2-3$ for engineered units of any precision.
    Industrial epoxy will likely cost 1$/unit, +/-, in small quantities.
    Total 4$, or so, qty 3k total.
    Plus lots of work in assy, several $ each. You cannot assemble 60 per hour.

    You could get 3000 units of barrels and fitments and an assy jig (pop/rivet/pin) made by any jobshop for around 10k$.
    And maybe a drill-jig to make the forks yourself.

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