1. This lathe has been in storage for the last 10 years. We were thinking of converting it to CNC, but decided not too, becase this lathe is very rare and a very nice lathe for a hobbyist or enthusiast.

    However we did converted to single phase by replacing the AC motor with a new 1.5KW 2 pole motor and adding a 1.5Kw inverter and contactors and wiring directly into the existing switchgear and having two speeds set.

    This lathe will run form a 13amp plug.

    We have also replaced the leadscrew on the cross slide with a C5 ballscrew. the ballscrew has removed all backlash on the cross slide.

    Apart from that the lathe is standard and has hardly had any use and was used in education in a local school.

    Comes complete with a three and a four jaw chuck, a large steady, a adjustable taper cutting guide a number of spare gears and a faceplate

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Please note due to the size and weight, this is pickup only, unless you contact us to get a quote for delivery.

    you can buy online, but please note that there is not option for shipping, so pickup only.
    If you want a price for delivery, please contact me, with yoru address and i will get a price.
    https://www.zappautomation.co.uk/myf...tre-lathe.html



    This is more information on this lathe.

    Introduced in 1978 and made in limited numbers, the Myford 280 had a 140 mm centre height (5.5-inches), a capacity between centres of 600 mm (23.625"), a V-way bed and an all-geared headstock with 16 speeds that spanned a very useful 30 to 2000 r.p.m. Built in two basic versions, the 280 was the only Myford to be offered in a completely metric version, the 280-EM having an all-metric screwcutting gearbox, leadscrew and compound slide rest feed screws and dials while the 280-EI was an alternative all-imperial (inch) model. Alternative "safety" versions for educational use were offered, these being designated as the (metric) 280-EM and (imperial) 280-EI with both fitted as standard with a low-voltage control circuit, a safety switch and lock to the changewheel cover and a motor cut-out switch operated by the saddle. Designed to compete against the well-established and popular Colchester Bantam and Harrison M250 lathes, the basic mechanical specification of all types was generous: a screwcutting gearbox and power feeds provided as standard; the V and flat-way bed was induction hardened and ground and the headstock gears, running in a splash-lubrication oil bath, were hardened and precision ground using the Reishauer process; the 26 mm bore, D1-3" No. 4 Morse taper spindle ran in expensive micro-precision GAMET taper roller bearings and the lathe was mounted on braced sheet-steel cabinet stand with a deep chip tray and built-in electrical controls. As an option, the central section of the stand could be provided with a locking tool cupboard and a full-length splash back was also available. Power was provided by reversible 2-speed motors of either 3 or single-phase operation: the 3-phase motor being 1.9/1.5 h.p. and the 1-phase 1.5/1 h.p. - both driving to the headstock input pulley by twin V-belts. Spindle-speed control was by a Colchester/Harrison-like system with two levers on the top of the headstock and a high/low range lever on its front face Totally enclosed against the ingress of dirt and shavings the screwcutting gearbox contained hardened and ground gears running in a splash oil bath - a sight glass being provided on the front face of the box to check the level. The metric box (working in conjunction with a 3 mm pitch leadscrew) could produce 26 pitches from 0.2 to 4 mm and the imperial (leadscrew pitch 1/8") 25 threads from 8 to 64 t.p.i. ( 1/64" to 1/4"). A total of 32 metric feed rates were available from 0.05 to 1.33 mm sliding and 0.017 to 0.44 mm surfacing. The 50 rates of inch feed spanned 0.002 to 0.042" sliding and 0.0007 to 0.014" surfacing (all per single revolution of the spindle). Control of the gearbox was by an 8-position (metric) or 9-position (imperial) numbered dial on the front face in conjunction with a spring-loaded lever to release and lock its setting, a 3-position lever on top of the box and a reversible double-gear cluster in the changewheel train (just like that employed on the Series 7 lathe gearbox) that gave fast and slow input speeds and hence an easy switch between coarse screwcutting and fine power feeds (for correct operation of the box reference to the Instruction book is essential). The changewheel drive to the gearbox was through a tumble-reverse mechanism - contained within the headstock, where it benefited from the headstock oil bath - and could be arranged with either a metric/imperial or imperial metric conversion set, or alternative gears to give additional pitches. An easily-changed shear pin, positioned through the leadscrew just outboard of the screwcutting gearbox, protected the gear-train drive. By the late 1970s the customer could specify changewheels in a non-metallic material to reduce noise and the need for lubrication.
    With an oil supply in the base (distributed by splash) the double-walled apron was fitted with a pair of conventional half-nuts (running in adjustable gibs) to engage the leadscrew. Power sliding and surfacing feeds were selected by a push-pull knob ("in" for sliding feed and "out" for surfacing with neutral between) and engaged by lever-operated clutch that incorporated a spring-loaded torque limiter to protect the mechanism against damage by overload. A thoughtful touch was the provision of a large zeroing micrometer dial on the carriage handwheel. As a very useful extra (and to compliment the standard-fit, saddle-activated motor cut-out switch on the 280-EM and 280-EI) the lathe could be fitted with an automatic disengage system to the carriage longitudinal feed; this was operated by a long bar running the length of the bed that carried four individually adjustable stops. Unfortunately the disengagement mechanism only worked in one direction - towards the headstock.
    Unlike so many lathes of a similar size that used a short, plain cross slide that on the 280 was both full length (to even out wear) and carried 4 T-slots behind the 360-degree swivelling top slide. Both zeroing micrometer dials were large and easily read (and could be supplied as dual inch/metric units) with a non-glare satin-chrome finish. Though few customers can have chosen it - preferring instead a 4-way or quick-set unit - the standard toolpost was the one from the Myford 7-series, a simple triangular clamp with self-aligning "wobble" washer. Unusually, to let the top slide swivel round to 90-degrees, the full-circle cross-feed handwheel rim could be removed.
    With a ball-race thrust bearing and 3-inch graduated scale the tailstock barrel carried a sensible No. 3 Morse taper socket that allowed really heavy drilling to be undertaken. The tailstock could be set over on its sole plate for taper turning but, unfortunately, the feed handwheel was not fitted with a micrometer collar.
    Electrical fittings varied with early machines having a switch box mounted at the rear of the headstock and later models an improved self-contained enclosure fastened to the front edge of the chip tray at the headstock end of the stand. The usual type of "no-volt" push-button starter was fitted, to prevent the machine restarting after a power cut, and an emergency stop button and a low-voltage control circuit also provided.

  2. Reduced to 1500 Inc VAT
    This is a good-sized lathe and runs from a single phase through an inverter.
    It's large, so will need either picking up, or we can quote you for delivery with a machine moving company.


    Quote Originally Posted by Gary View Post
    This lathe has been in storage for the last 10 years. We were thinking of converting it to CNC, but decided not too, because this lathe is very rare and a very nice lathe for a hobbyist or enthusiast.

    However, we did convert to single phase by replacing the AC motor with a new 1.5KW 2 pole motor and adding a 1.5Kw inverter and contactors and wiring directly into the existing switchgear and having two speeds set.

    This lathe will run form a 13amp plug.

    We have also replaced the leadscrew on the cross slide with a C5 ballscrew. the ballscrew has removed all backlash on the cross slide.

    Apart from that the lathe is standard and has hardly had any use and was used in education in a local school.

    Comes complete with a three and a four jaw chuck, a large steady, a adjustable taper cutting guide a number of spare gears and a faceplate

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Myford-280-gear-head-lathe.jpg 
Views:	126 
Size:	67.9 KB 
ID:	25885Click image for larger version. 

Name:	20190613_145122.jpg 
Views:	98 
Size:	68.2 KB 
ID:	25886Click image for larger version. 

Name:	20190613_145139.jpg 
Views:	94 
Size:	94.4 KB 
ID:	25887Click image for larger version. 

Name:	20190613_145114.jpg 
Views:	98 
Size:	27.4 KB 
ID:	25888



    Please note due to the size and weight, this is pickup only, unless you contact us to get a quote for delivery.
    This is not Sold.


    This is now sold.


    you can buy online, but please note that there is not option for shipping, so pickup only.
    If you want a price for delivery, please contact me, with your address and i will get a price.
    https://www.zappautomation.co.uk/myf...tre-lathe.html



    This is more information on this lathe.

    Introduced in 1978 and made in limited numbers, the Myford 280 had a 140 mm centre height (5.5-inches), a capacity between centres of 600 mm (23.625"), a V-way bed and an all-geared headstock with 16 speeds that spanned a very useful 30 to 2000 r.p.m. Built in two basic versions, the 280 was the only Myford to be offered in a completely metric version, the 280-EM having an all-metric screwcutting gearbox, leadscrew and compound slide rest feed screws and dials while the 280-EI was an alternative all-imperial (inch) model. Alternative "safety" versions for educational use were offered, these being designated as the (metric) 280-EM and (imperial) 280-EI with both fitted as standard with a low-voltage control circuit, a safety switch and lock to the changewheel cover and a motor cut-out switch operated by the saddle. Designed to compete against the well-established and popular Colchester Bantam and Harrison M250 lathes, the basic mechanical specification of all types was generous: a screwcutting gearbox and power feeds provided as standard; the V and flat-way bed was induction hardened and ground and the headstock gears, running in a splash-lubrication oil bath, were hardened and precision ground using the Reishauer process; the 26 mm bore, D1-3" No. 4 Morse taper spindle ran in expensive micro-precision GAMET taper roller bearings and the lathe was mounted on braced sheet-steel cabinet stand with a deep chip tray and built-in electrical controls. As an option, the central section of the stand could be provided with a locking tool cupboard and a full-length splash back was also available. Power was provided by reversible 2-speed motors of either 3 or single-phase operation: the 3-phase motor being 1.9/1.5 h.p. and the 1-phase 1.5/1 h.p. - both driving to the headstock input pulley by twin V-belts. Spindle-speed control was by a Colchester/Harrison-like system with two levers on the top of the headstock and a high/low range lever on its front face Totally enclosed against the ingress of dirt and shavings the screwcutting gearbox contained hardened and ground gears running in a splash oil bath - a sight glass being provided on the front face of the box to check the level. The metric box (working in conjunction with a 3 mm pitch leadscrew) could produce 26 pitches from 0.2 to 4 mm and the imperial (leadscrew pitch 1/8") 25 threads from 8 to 64 t.p.i. ( 1/64" to 1/4"). A total of 32 metric feed rates were available from 0.05 to 1.33 mm sliding and 0.017 to 0.44 mm surfacing. The 50 rates of inch feed spanned 0.002 to 0.042" sliding and 0.0007 to 0.014" surfacing (all per single revolution of the spindle). Control of the gearbox was by an 8-position (metric) or 9-position (imperial) numbered dial on the front face in conjunction with a spring-loaded lever to release and lock its setting, a 3-position lever on top of the box and a reversible double-gear cluster in the changewheel train (just like that employed on the Series 7 lathe gearbox) that gave fast and slow input speeds and hence an easy switch between coarse screwcutting and fine power feeds (for correct operation of the box reference to the Instruction book is essential). The changewheel drive to the gearbox was through a tumble-reverse mechanism - contained within the headstock, where it benefited from the headstock oil bath - and could be arranged with either a metric/imperial or imperial metric conversion set, or alternative gears to give additional pitches. An easily-changed shear pin, positioned through the leadscrew just outboard of the screwcutting gearbox, protected the gear-train drive. By the late 1970s the customer could specify changewheels in a non-metallic material to reduce noise and the need for lubrication.
    With an oil supply in the base (distributed by splash) the double-walled apron was fitted with a pair of conventional half-nuts (running in adjustable gibs) to engage the leadscrew. Power sliding and surfacing feeds were selected by a push-pull knob ("in" for sliding feed and "out" for surfacing with neutral between) and engaged by lever-operated clutch that incorporated a spring-loaded torque limiter to protect the mechanism against damage by overload. A thoughtful touch was the provision of a large zeroing micrometer dial on the carriage handwheel. As a very useful extra (and to compliment the standard-fit, saddle-activated motor cut-out switch on the 280-EM and 280-EI) the lathe could be fitted with an automatic disengage system to the carriage longitudinal feed; this was operated by a long bar running the length of the bed that carried four individually adjustable stops. Unfortunately the disengagement mechanism only worked in one direction - towards the headstock.
    Unlike so many lathes of a similar size that used a short, plain cross slide that on the 280 was both full length (to even out wear) and carried 4 T-slots behind the 360-degree swivelling top slide. Both zeroing micrometer dials were large and easily read (and could be supplied as dual inch/metric units) with a non-glare satin-chrome finish. Though few customers can have chosen it - preferring instead a 4-way or quick-set unit - the standard toolpost was the one from the Myford 7-series, a simple triangular clamp with self-aligning "wobble" washer. Unusually, to let the top slide swivel round to 90-degrees, the full-circle cross-feed handwheel rim could be removed.
    With a ball-race thrust bearing and 3-inch graduated scale the tailstock barrel carried a sensible No. 3 Morse taper socket that allowed really heavy drilling to be undertaken. The tailstock could be set over on its sole plate for taper turning but, unfortunately, the feed handwheel was not fitted with a micrometer collar.
    Electrical fittings varied with early machines having a switch box mounted at the rear of the headstock and later models an improved self-contained enclosure fastened to the front edge of the chip tray at the headstock end of the stand. The usual type of "no-volt" push-button starter was fitted, to prevent the machine restarting after a power cut, and an emergency stop button and a low-voltage control circuit also provided.
    Last edited by Gary; 5 Days Ago at 11:59 AM.

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