. .
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
  1. #21
    I made this heated case for harmonicas a couple of years back. The joints were made using an Inkscape add-on (tabbed box maker). they just needed a bit of fettling to make them fit nicely.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Harmocase.jpg 
Views:	21 
Size:	256.5 KB 
ID:	27358Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Harmocase2.jpg 
Views:	23 
Size:	353.8 KB 
ID:	27359
    No man is an island entire of itself; every man
    is a piece of the continent, a part of the main;
    if a clod be washed away by the sea, Europe
    is the less.

    Devotions upon Emergent Occasions
    John Donne 1624

  2. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by Neale View Post
    Not so difficult to do, I suspect - I visited a weaver in the Outer Hebrides a year or two back who was using a floor loom, but, in effect, bolted on the side there was a solenoid-operated mechanism for operating the heddle levers (sorry - full technical terms escape me!). The solenoids were operated by software running on an Apple Mac (I think it was). So, I'm waiting for the first Mach3-controlled loom to appear in this forum! Punched cards are so nineteenth century - use Mach3 and take a giant leap into the twentieth
    I think they are just called warp lifters. You would need hundreds of solenoids though to get ant decent width of cloth.

    There is some software out called Wovn, for designing and producing cloth on a hobby jacquard.
    Last edited by cropwell; 1 Week Ago at 07:16 PM.
    No man is an island entire of itself; every man
    is a piece of the continent, a part of the main;
    if a clod be washed away by the sea, Europe
    is the less.

    Devotions upon Emergent Occasions
    John Donne 1624

  3. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by cropwell View Post
    I think they are just called warp lifters. You would need hundreds of solenoids though to get ant decent width of cloth.

    There is some software out called Wovn, for designing and producing cloth on a hobby jacquard.
    Ah, yes, there are different levels of sophistication with the punched card systems. The Jacquard silk picture weaving does indeed use many individually-controlled warp threads. I admit that I was thinking more of conventional textile weaving using maybe 8-12 warp threads to form the pattern but repeated across the width of the fabric. The Harris tweed weavers with their Hattersley looms have some card-based (actually small metal plates linked into a chain) patterns that are only 4 "cards" long although some are much longer. I remember seeing a Jacquard silk loom at a museum in (I think) Manchester where the attendant told me that they were frightened to run it too much; it was working but if a thread broke or they eventually reached the end of the warp thread on the drum, there was no-one left who knew how to rethread it! Possibly an exaggeration, but I doubt that there would have been many people who could do it.

    Anyway, this was the kind of thing I had in mind.

    Nice little box, BTW, Rob.

  4. #24
    The box is just plywood, my next harmonica heated box will be perspex with fused mitred joints. I have yet to play with vacuum forming for the interior moulding.
    I gave the original to my harmonica teacher (long term loan) and I intend to swap it out with Mk2 before next winter.

    This is what I was thinking in terms of cnc looms:-

    https://www.digitalweaving.no/tc2-loom/
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UK6IqovdKLA

    But they don't have the charm of the working original Jacquards I saw in Lyon about 7 years ago.

    Cheers.

    R

    PS don't show HI or you will have your next project. (Might be a good exhibit on the SMEE stand).
    No man is an island entire of itself; every man
    is a piece of the continent, a part of the main;
    if a clod be washed away by the sea, Europe
    is the less.

    Devotions upon Emergent Occasions
    John Donne 1624

  5. #25
    Kitwn's Avatar
    Lives in Exmouth, Australia. Last Activity: 6 Hours Ago Has been a member for 2-3 years. Has a total post count of 310. Received thanks 34 times, giving thanks to others 8 times.
    Funny you mention automatic looms, 'cos I've already made one. The four shaft prototype at least. I'll try and find the video later on. It used one Arduino MEGA for the controller plus one NANO, stepper driver and motor for each shaft. Not sure if I'll ever build the finished machine, depends on the whims of the weaver and how big a house we decide to buy when we finally retire to Tasmania.

    A true Jacquard loom has separate control of each warp thread so can make any pattern imaginable but is very complex as that video of the TC2 Neale linked to shows. Most looms have several shafts (4,8,16 being common), each of which lifts every 2nd, 4th etc. thread. Much simpler but the patterns are more limited, though that's a relative term as I can see what's possible with an 8 shaft loom as I type. This is the type of loom that repeats a pattern across the fabric.

    The mechanism that automatically lifts the shafts ina specific series of patterns is called a dobby, derived from 'Do-Boy' since the earliest mechanism was a boy perched on top of the loom lifting shafts as required. Harry Potter comes to mind. Non-computer dobbys use pegs in a series of bars to decide which shafts get lifted for each pick (throw) of the shuttle and the bars are moved on at each pick. This can be a purely manual powered machine, the dobby is there simpy to automate the lifting of a complex repeating pattern of shafts so the eaver doesn't have to remember the complex sequence of foot work required. The loom I built which had a sequence of shaft combinations stored in an Arduino's memory and used stepper motors to lift the shafts was effectively a dobby loom, though the original requirement was simply to remove the work normally done by the weaers feet which causes too much back pain for my wife.

    Edit: Found the video! Note there is no sound.
    This shows the four shaft prototype but the frame is designed to fit eight shafts. The motor mounting parts were cut on the CNC router. Despite the rather Heath Robinson construction, this turned out quite well and proved the overall concept. The countermarch design has a sprung backbeam which means the tension on each thread is constant at all times. The Arduino NANO controlling each motor was progammed with appropriate accel/decel values to ensure a quick but smooth action and each shaft moves a different amount to compensate for the spacing so that the shed (the opening between the threads through which the shuttle runs) produced is wide and even.

    Last edited by Kitwn; 1 Week Ago at 04:30 AM.
    Engineering is the art of doing for ten shillings what any fool can do for a pound.
    Wellington.

  6. #26
    Kitwn's Avatar
    Lives in Exmouth, Australia. Last Activity: 6 Hours Ago Has been a member for 2-3 years. Has a total post count of 310. Received thanks 34 times, giving thanks to others 8 times.
    Quote Originally Posted by Neale View Post
    Thanks, Nick - my interest is a bit more towards drag knife work (and I'll get one of those set up on my machine one day) but it's always interesting to see the art of the possible, especially with relatively simple bits of kit.
    Yet another rabbit hole we've been down is screen-printed T-shirts and bought a Zing Air machine which uses a small drag knife for cutting out the stencils. It comes with the approriate design/control software.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=39t_R98CdZA
    Engineering is the art of doing for ten shillings what any fool can do for a pound.
    Wellington.

  7. Never before have I wanted my wife to take up.... erm... making cloth. Fascinating machine!

  8. #28
    Kitwn's Avatar
    Lives in Exmouth, Australia. Last Activity: 6 Hours Ago Has been a member for 2-3 years. Has a total post count of 310. Received thanks 34 times, giving thanks to others 8 times.
    Quote Originally Posted by Doddy View Post
    Never before have I wanted my wife to take up.... erm... making cloth. Fascinating machine!
    Even though we live in the tropics, the scarves Christie weaves on the simplest of her 3 looms sell quite well in our local craft shop and are quicker to make than you might think. Weaving is one of those hobbies that can be self-funding with a little effort, as might owning a CNC router if I can get it up to scratch.

    The daft thing is, all this stuff I've been doing is just spin-offs of one starting project. C suggested I try timelapse photography of the night sky. That led to learning about stepper motors for a camera motion control dolly to make the results more interesting and everything else is just another application of stepper motors and the software that drives them, including the CNC router that makes the parts for all the other projects!!!!
    Engineering is the art of doing for ten shillings what any fool can do for a pound.
    Wellington.

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 2 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 2 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 15-12-2019, 09:44 PM
  2. work piece showing outside table display
    By terry1956 in forum Artsoft Mach (3 & 4)
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 09-01-2017, 10:36 AM
  3. New Table Build, 12x6 work area, drawings up any advice?
    By silverdrgn in forum Plasma Table Machines
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 23-01-2016, 07:34 PM
  4. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 12-11-2014, 09:14 AM
  5. Setting up work on the rotary table
    By irving2008 in forum Machine Discussion
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 09-01-2010, 10:27 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •