. .
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
  1. #1
    I think that is the term used by serious industrial cnc systems for the capability to programme simple jobs at the machine. Like a wizard, the operator enters parameters and dimensions inorder to generate and run the G code to achieve a task.

    I want this capability on my woodworking workshop cnc, and have been looking for a solution. Sure Fusion 360 is a great solution for CAD/CAM of a proper project, but overkill if I just want to cut a pocket, profile or tenon in a piece of wood NOW.

    Carbide Create caught my attention as it is free, simple and combines simple 2D drafting and 2.5D CAM, so quick sketch, generate tool paths and run. Next time modify dimensions, regenerate tool paths and go again. But not sure it lends itself to parametric models and customised canned sequences.

    What do other do? Always full CAD, CAM, run? Do Macros or G code variables offer the flexibility I seek....?

  2. #2
    Sounds like what you are looking for is Parametric G-Code https://www.cncci.com/post/quick-int...ic-programming. The article list a few different flavours.

  3. #3
    Thanks eci, but firing up a text editor and hand coding was not what I had in mind. The whole point of the conversational approach is that it removes the need to have in-depth knowledge of a specific G code brand.

    It is common on industrial toolroom machines ( Mazak take here or Fanuc here)

    Someone must be finding a way to work this way, as most hobby work is better suited to this workflow.

  4. #4
    Are you using Mach3? That has a bunch of built-in wizards for this kind of thing. Can't remember if LinuxCNC does as well but it seems likely that someone has an add-on if not. I've never used this bit of Mach3 myself so can't say much about it apart from knowing that it's there.

  5. Quote Originally Posted by Neale View Post
    Are you using Mach3? That has a bunch of built-in wizards for this kind of thing. Can't remember if LinuxCNC does as well but it seems likely that someone has an add-on if not. I've never used this bit of Mach3 myself so can't say much about it apart from knowing that it's there.
    Yep it does and they are very useful for simple jobs like pockets, hole patterns, surfacing etc I use it all the time for surfacing beds. You can build up a job by running each wizzard and pasting code into the file.

    Lots of programs have similar features, MyCNC does the same I believe Neale or makes it very easy because will take a dxf and turn it into code.!

    There are lots of parametric woodworking software as well for things like Kitchen cabinets and door production which make it very easy to quickly change styles, sizes, etc and nest them into sheets but they are eye-watering expensive and aimed at industry.

    That said for simple things like pockets, hole patterns, etc then it's not difficult to make your own G-code using parametric code. It's actually a good exercise in learning G-code if anyone is feeling a little masochistic or is that psychotic...I'm not sure..
    -use common sense, if you lack it, there is no software to help that.

  6. #6
    Kitwn's Avatar
    Lives in Exmouth, Australia. Last Activity: 7 Hours Ago Has been a member for 2-3 years. Has a total post count of 474. Received thanks 64 times, giving thanks to others 11 times.
    Not exactly the parametric solution you're looking for but I've been a fan of CamBam for several years. Not expensive but more than powerful enough for the sort of quick jobs you're talking about. Draw the shapes, define the cutting you want done around them, write the g-code, cut.
    Engineering is the art of doing for ten shillings what any fool can do for a pound.
    Wellington.

  7. #7
    Thanks guys. Looking into your prompts, the picture is kind of confused! Was intending to use UCCNC, which like Mach3 supports both Macros and Plugins. Using these it appears interactive Wizard becomes possible and quite a few have been developed looking at their forums. However it is hardcore coding to make your own.

    So it seems what I am looking for sits more comfortably within CAM than Controller and requires it to have simple CAD capabilities. Thanks Kit for pointing me to Camban, that is a more grown up version of Carbide Create. Critically it has both the basic drafting capability of CC and the plug-in/automation architecture of the machine controllers.

    Both the woodworkers with CNC routers I know are wedded to some version of Aspire, which give them the combined CAD/CAM platform to get things done. I guess I will eiither have to have a PC in the workshop capable of running Fusion, or have two workflows: Camban or Aspire for 2.5D in the workshop and Fusion for full 3D.

  8. #8
    Kitwn's Avatar
    Lives in Exmouth, Australia. Last Activity: 7 Hours Ago Has been a member for 2-3 years. Has a total post count of 474. Received thanks 64 times, giving thanks to others 11 times.
    CamBam is very capable, especially once you discover the webpage full of add-ons and the forum to go with them which extend it's abilities considerably. I also like the license which is a 'pay once, updates for life' arrangement.

    http://www.atelier-des-fougeres.fr/C...ugin_menu.html

    Kit
    Engineering is the art of doing for ten shillings what any fool can do for a pound.
    Wellington.

  9. The Following User Says Thank You to Kitwn For This Useful Post:


  10. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Kitwn View Post
    CamBam is very capable, especially once you discover the webpage full of add-ons and the forum to go with them which extend it's abilities considerably. I also like the license which is a 'pay once, updates for life' arrangement.

    http://www.atelier-des-fougeres.fr/C...ugin_menu.html

    Kit
    I am also a Cambam user...no complaints :)

  11. Quote Originally Posted by Andrewg View Post
    Both the woodworkers with CNC routers I know are wedded to some version of Aspire, which give them the combined CAD/CAM platform to get things done. I guess I will eiither have to have a PC in the workshop capable of running Fusion, or have two workflows: Camban or Aspire for 2.5D in the workshop and Fusion for full 3D.
    Unless you are using a 4th or 5th axis then you can't machine 3D in one sitting. Best you can do is 2.5D without turning the work over to finish a true 3D object.
    Even if you use Fusion to create a true 3D model the G-code it's spitting out will only be 2.5D code when using 3-axis and aspire will do everything fusion will in that respect.
    Your only selecting the surfaces on a 3D model which can be accessed by a 3 axis interpolation, if you want to access undercuts etc of a true 3D model then you will need to re-fixture or add another axis or two.!
    -use common sense, if you lack it, there is no software to help that.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. G30 programming
    By Leadhead in forum Programmers Corner
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 04-06-2017, 08:13 AM
  2. NEW MEMBER: Hello all, New member here from London, keen woodworker and interest in homebuild
    By justice86 in forum New Member Introductions
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 06-11-2013, 12:02 AM
  3. I will have a trial for programming job
    By hoezap in forum Tool & Tooling Technology
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 09-02-2013, 02:00 PM
  4. Programming an engraver
    By patch in forum Computer Software
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 24-11-2009, 09:11 PM
  5. Programming Mach3 screens
    By Smiler in forum Artsoft Mach (3 & 4)
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 17-01-2009, 02:15 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •