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  1. #11
    Kitwn's Avatar
    Lives in Exmouth, Australia. Last Activity: 6 Hours Ago Has been a member for 2-3 years. Has a total post count of 531. Received thanks 72 times, giving thanks to others 14 times.
    If the disk is to have any holes in it you can clamp the blank, drill the holes and screw it down through those. Remove the outer clamps and away you go.
    Engineering is the art of doing for ten shillings what any fool can do for a pound.
    Wellington.

  2. #12
    Kitwn's Avatar
    Lives in Exmouth, Australia. Last Activity: 6 Hours Ago Has been a member for 2-3 years. Has a total post count of 531. Received thanks 72 times, giving thanks to others 14 times.
    Quote Originally Posted by AndyUK View Post
    !!!
    Precisely!
    Engineering is the art of doing for ten shillings what any fool can do for a pound.
    Wellington.

  3. #13
    I generally use a pocket on a spoil board like wot Jazz said, but I also have 3D printed some plastic 2-4-8 blocks with M6 threads in them and clamp these onto the T slots and use grub screws or long nylon cap head screws in the horizontal threaded hole to apply clamping force. That way no steel to chew the cutter.

    Aren't those Mitee Bites expensive !

  4. The Following User Says Thank You to cropwell For This Useful Post:


  5. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Faust View Post
    Hi there! I'm strictly a hobbyist here and, although I'm trained in the programming of the machines, a lot of the hardware is new to me and I don't know a lot of the terminology required, so please bare with me!

    Let's say for sake of argument that I want to use a small home CNC 3-axis mill to create a thickish disk from a rectangular block of wood of similar diameter. I'm assuming to mill the edges correctly I'd need to do the top half, then flip it over and do the bottom. Ignoring issues with setting datum for the cylinder for now, how would I clamp the circular half down securely so that the still-rectangular bottom half could be carved safely?

    Sorry if this is a really silly question, but I've searched around for CNC specific clamps and can only find hold-down and stepper clamps, which would block tooling on the sides or parts of the sides, and I don't like the idea of trying to mill around the clamps. I'm sure some suitable equipment should exist for this but I either don't know the name or how to use it! D:

    -F
    I'm not sure if i'm missing something, but couldn't you just fix the block of wood to the spoil board with double sided tape and machine it. The tape usually holds well. A vacuum holder I would imagine would work but be expensive.
    Cheers
    Andrew

  6. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by the great waldo View Post
    I'm not sure if i'm missing something, but couldn't you just fix the block of wood to the spoil board with double sided tape and machine it. The tape usually holds well. A vacuum holder I would imagine would work but be expensive.
    Cheers
    Andrew
    Double sided tape is OK if you have a large contact area, but the efficacy diminishes rapidly on small bits. It also doesn't do well with aggressive machining.

  7. #16
    Kitwn's Avatar
    Lives in Exmouth, Australia. Last Activity: 6 Hours Ago Has been a member for 2-3 years. Has a total post count of 531. Received thanks 72 times, giving thanks to others 14 times.
    Slightly off from what you need, but I made these cam clamps on Sunday just to try out the idea. They are based on a design from Marius Hornberger on YouTube but I'll design my own if I decide to mass-produce them. To make sure they dont slip I fix them to the base with an M8 bolt, just loose enough to turn then lock them down once in place. Worked OK holding the test piece for surface skimming with a 22mm tool and being quick and easy to make from scraps of wood they can be treated as sacrificial.
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Engineering is the art of doing for ten shillings what any fool can do for a pound.
    Wellington.

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