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  1. #21
    Thank you for great report and pictures.
    I am enjoying it immensely even though I know that I will never be able to do the same for my Bridgeport :sad: (not enough skill and no access to the kit you have).
    Look forward to CNC Beaver :clap:
    Chris

  2. #22
    I'm glad you find it useful chris .That is why we do it .
    In the past I have often made use of forums for my projects and am happy to give something back now I am working on a project.
    Thanks for the feedback chris.

  3. #23
    I found a nice link about how to make a leadscrew cover yourself .
    www.ixen-cnc.com
    Only I do not know what to use as material.
    Has anyone a Suggestion?
    Readily available and inexpensive.

  4. #24
    Tom's Avatar
    Location unknown. Last Activity: 30-11-2016 Has been a member for 7-8 years. Has a total post count of 172. Referred 1 members to the community.
    Quote Originally Posted by Andre View Post
    I'm glad you find it useful chris .That is why we do it .
    In the past I have often made use of forums for my projects and am happy to give something back now I am working on a project.
    Thanks for the feedback chris.
    I definitely agree with this sentiment. :clap:

    I found a nice link about how to make a leadscrew cover yourself .
    www.ixen-cnc.com
    Andre, I made one of those covers for my mini-lathe once. In the end I didn't use it, but it was a very interesting excercise in origami! Definitely try with paper first! It was tricky!
    I used some plastic from a craft shop (about the thickness of the thickest plastic wallets you can buy from the stationary shop). For your big machine you would need something thicker, but be careful that it will not crack while flexing.

    I am just thinking out loud - you could also cut the flat areas from thin metal, and use thin neoprene, or canvas for the hinges.

  5. #25
    Hi Tom
    This is maybe a good idea but I think using denim and saturated with epoxy
    and then in a mold as it is almost cured so the hinges can still be well formed
    but in any case a good idea
    Kind regards.
    Andre

  6. #26
    Hello Everyone,
    Eureka finally done with scraping I was almost thinking this is the never ending storie
    all that scraping.
    In any case, it ended well and everything is within the predefined tolerance 20 micron for the X axis 10 micron for the Y axis and 15 micron for the Z axis
    I think that meets my requirements.
    Good advice for everyone who enters the challenge of schraping
    are aware that it will take longer as you think!!!!
    It is like the medieval monks and the scriptures that they have made.
    Now I can finally begin on other components
    Kind regards,
    Andre

  7. #27
    Lee Roberts's Avatar
    Lives in Wigan, United Kingdom. Current Activity: Viewing Moderator Control Panel Has been a member for 9-10 years. Has a total post count of 2,545. Received thanks 161 times, giving thanks to others 652 times. Made a monetary donation to the upkeep of the community. Referred 10 members to the community.
    Looking forward to the new pics Andre !

  8. #28
    Lee Roberts's Avatar
    Lives in Wigan, United Kingdom. Current Activity: Viewing Moderator Control Panel Has been a member for 9-10 years. Has a total post count of 2,545. Received thanks 161 times, giving thanks to others 652 times. Made a monetary donation to the upkeep of the community. Referred 10 members to the community.
    Quote Originally Posted by Tom View Post
    I am just thinking out loud - you could also cut the flat areas from thin metal, and use thin neoprene, or canvas for the hinges.
    I have looked into this as well Tom, liking the idea of thin metal for the flat areas, what about some sort of sticky tape or sticky cloth tape to make the hinges and join it all togther ?

  9. #29
    hello andre
    just a note to thank you for such a detailed build thread:clap::clap::clap:
    as i am just an agricultural engineer, could you tell me more about "scraping" is it to take high spots of of surface if so how do you find them engineer blue?
    i am facinated at the work you have put into your mill and i would love the knowledge you have.
    I'll just keep repairing tractors with my big hammer:heehee:
    Tom

  10. #30
    Scraping is used to get any surface flat using engineers blue and an other flat surface, the one you scrape will end up as good as the flat you use.
    Hand scraped surface plates are made in 3's, done in a round robin mode which is reputed to give the flattest plate available but at a very high cost!

    Peter

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