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  1. Which would be the best power supply for a NEMA34 34SSM1460-EC1000 Closed-Loop Stepper motor 142MM 9n.m 1280 oz.in 6A , 4.2mh inductance and an
    HBS86H 2-phase hybrid servo drive 30-100VDC/24-80VAC

    Click image for larger version. 

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    I was going to get a toroidal psu and use AC but after contacting Airlink Transformers they told me they are not building any personal transformers and even the normal off the shelf ones have at least a 28 day lead time due to covid_19 and don't have any idea when things might get back to normal.

    My X &Y axis have their own switching power supply as they are DC only drivers so for now I'll just use another switching power supply for the Z axis.

    I was thinking an 80v power supply if its not too much but most only have up to 48v some to 60v, not seen an 80v, any ideas to if It will be sutable and where to get one, within europe if possible(save on taxes & time) but I won't discard china depending on price as delivery is getting pretty fast lately.
    Thanks
    Derek

  2. #2
    Have you looked at the usual suspects - Farnell and RS-Components?, All you're looking for is a 70VAC toroidal transformer at around 300VA. RS- item 123-3990 with secondaries wired in series would be an option. You want a 10% head room on the supply voltage to cater for variances in your electrical supply.

  3. Thanks doddy, I do not know of the places you mention, I have been out of UK for over 30 years and then electronics, cnc, and almost everything was the last thing on my mind working at sea.
    I supose I could use a toroidal transformer like you say but as the psu for the other drives that I already have is square fitting a circular transformay may take up too much room in the case I have whereas another square one would probably fit better in less space.

    I am not very clued up on electronics but was hoping to eventually use a toroidal transformer for all axis running through a bridge rectifier for the Dc drivers and direct Ac for the one I mentioned, wheather or not this is possible I do not know yet. but for simplicity just adding a regulated psu for now would get me bye. If I'm wrong let me know, meantime ill take a look and save those websites, good for other stuff too.
    thanks
    Derek

  4. #4
    You can add this to the list
    Rapin on line

    https://www.rapidonline.com/Catalogu...Query=toroidal
    ..Clive
    The more you know, The better you know, How little you know

  5. The Following User Says Thank You to Clive S For This Useful Post:


  6. #5
    Muzzer's Avatar
    Lives in Lytham St. Annes, United Kingdom. Last Activity: 10 Hours Ago Has been a member for 2-3 years. Has a total post count of 241. Received thanks 33 times, giving thanks to others 5 times.
    It doesn't need to be toroidal. I'm not sure where that idea came from but it's become engrained practice now. Originally they became popular due to audiophiles claiming they were lower noise.

    A simpler solution depending on your location and circumstances might be to take a 110V site transformer and remove some of the outer secondary turns. That worked for me.

  7. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Kered View Post
    Which would be the best power supply for a NEMA34 34SSM1460-EC1000 Closed-Loop Stepper motor 142MM 9n.m 1280 oz.in 6A , 4.2mh inductance and an
    HBS86H 2-phase hybrid servo drive 30-100VDC/24-80VAC

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	HTB17vnvXL_HK1Jjy1zeq6AfjpXag.jpg 
Views:	32 
Size:	188.6 KB 
ID:	29021

    I was going to get a toroidal psu and use AC but after contacting Airlink Transformers they told me they are not building any personal transformers and even the normal off the shelf ones have at least a 28 day lead time due to covid_19 and don't have any idea when things might get back to normal.

    My X &Y axis have their own switching power supply as they are DC only drivers so for now I'll just use another switching power supply for the Z axis.

    I was thinking an 80v power supply if its not too much but most only have up to 48v some to 60v, not seen an 80v, any ideas to if It will be sutable and where to get one, within europe if possible(save on taxes & time) but I won't discard china depending on price as delivery is getting pretty fast lately.
    Thanks
    Derek
    https://cnc-plus.de/en/CNC-Electroni...supplies-.html

    Article number: E-04-2-40600 if you want 80VAC or E-04-2-30450 if you are happy with 60VAC. CNC Plus is a reliable German company, I have ordered several times from them over the years and always delivered fast and everything was good.

  8. Thanks a_camera, the 60v are fairly easy to find
    Looks like I'll just have to go with a €30 60v switching psu for now, I don't mind paying €80+ for a toroidal if It was for all 3 axis but for just 1 axis is a bit much only to have to change it later on, having said that 60v may not prove to be sufficient for the mentioned nema 34, we shall find out.

    A question showing my ignorance on the subject, could I join 2 switching power suplies of say 40v to get 80v connecting in series like batteries? or do they not work that way.
    Also the board with bridge rectifier with capacitors to change to dc with smoothing, does it have a name? do you have to make them diy or are they ready available por purchase?
    Life is full of questions and decisions.

  9. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Kered View Post
    A question showing my ignorance on the subject, could I join 2 switching power suplies of say 40v to get 80v connecting in series like batteries? or do they not work that way.
    Also the board with bridge rectifier with capacitors to change to dc with smoothing, does it have a name?
    You could, but you would have to know what you are doing to avoid the big BANG! I would recommend you get one power supply of the correct voltage and don't think about any bodgy alternatives.

    I called my power supply conditioning circuit Eric, but he died some years ago of capacitor failure.

  10. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Kered View Post
    Thanks a_camera, the 60v are fairly easy to find
    Looks like I'll just have to go with a €30 60v switching psu for now, I don't mind paying €80+ for a toroidal if It was for all 3 axis but for just 1 axis is a bit much only to have to change it later on, having said that 60v may not prove to be sufficient for the mentioned nema 34, we shall find out.

    A question showing my ignorance on the subject, could I join 2 switching power suplies of say 40v to get 80v connecting in series like batteries? or do they not work that way.
    Also the board with bridge rectifier with capacitors to change to dc with smoothing, does it have a name? do you have to make them diy or are they ready available por purchase?
    Life is full of questions and decisions.
    Yes, you can connect those in series or parallel. Connecting in series is simpler than connecting batteries in series since there is no plus/minus on it. If you connect them in series you must make sure that the right wire is connected to the right one on the other winding, otherwise you will get the difference, not the some of the voltages. This is not a problem if the wires are unmarked, just switch wires and measure again.

    Connecting transformers in parallel needs more caution because the voltages must be very near each other and also must be careful with the phases. These transformers have phase markings and are well made. I am using the 30V transformer, connected the windings in parallel to get more current. My stepper drivers can only take maximum 50VDC, so I did not want to take chances with using 40V, which after the rectifier would result in 56VDC which is a bit too high. On the mains side I have a smooth starter which I bought from the same company, but unfortunately it is not listed any more. If you are interested you can send them a mail and ask or perhaps you can find one somewhere else. I think that's a must have on a toroidal transformer, otherwise you risk blowing your mains fuse when you switch it on.

    The rectifier I am using is this one: https://cnc-plus.de/en/CNC-Electroni...ge-output.html it does have large capacitors for smoothing but that's all, and that's enough for the purpose. I have a separate 12VDC PSU for the Ethernet - RS485 MODBUS converter and to power the UC300ETH I am using.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Last edited by A_Camera; 22-10-2020 at 08:08 AM.

  11. Quote Originally Posted by cropwell View Post
    You could, but you would have to know what you are doing to avoid the big BANG! I would recommend you get one power supply of the correct voltage and don't think about any bodgy alternatives.

    I called my power supply conditioning circuit Eric, but he died some years ago of capacitor failure.
    I would love to get an 80v switching power supply and be done but as yet the biggest one I've found so far(within reason)is a 70v 6a, the drivers max is 100vdc so well within safety margin.

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