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  1. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by Andrewg View Post
    Ah, and I was thinking of putting my machine on industrial castors so it could be easily moved forward for 'pass through' jobs. Maybe I should be considering how I bolt it's stand to the wall of my shed for great ridgidity instead!?
    Nonsense :)

    My mill is sat on a large steel bench that sits on machine castors (it was to be a frame for a router but I chickened on the build). The castors for moving the bench into position, the mill came later. There's no fricken way that thing moves (I think it's growing into the floor!) - even if I try to move it. Build it heavy :)

  2. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by Andrewg View Post
    Ah, and I was thinking of putting my machine on industrial castors so it could be easily moved forward for 'pass through' jobs. Maybe I should be considering how I bolt it's stand to the wall of my shed for great ridgidity instead!?
    If you bolt it to the shed wall it will shake the shit out of your shed! Honestly, these are powerful heavy beasts. With the gantry shifting around it shakes its bulk with it. A solid floor is what is needed in my opinion. And as I see it in a shed situation, a concrete base...... which mine has not got, hence my concrete pads for each foot.

  3. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by Pilsbury View Post
    If you bolt it to the shed wall it will shake the shit out of your shed! Honestly, these are powerful heavy beasts.
    That comment just reminded me of a funny story regards a machine build which exactly that did happen.!!

    I built a relatively small 600x400 but heavily built machine for a guy who always spoke about his "Workshop" and where it was going, ie in the corner, with the only question asked about being how strong a bench would be needed.? So I answered with "Very and makes sure it's fastened to the wall as these things have a lot of inertia when moving fast".

    Anyway, when I arrived to deliver it the workshop turned out to be a box standard 8x4 garden shed, inside it was immaculate with every square inch of space used, with custom made shelves holding every type of jam jar and re-usable container known to man full nuts n bolts, screws, and neatly hanging tools on the walls, etc you name it, a workshop Santa's Elf would be proud of.!

    So I looked at the bench and sure enough, it was strong and fastened to the wall, albeit the Shed wall, So I said you'll need to take the stuff off the shelves which he did while I was getting the machine out of the Van. Anyway, I get the machine in and on the bench and while I was setting it up, he started putting the stuff back on the shelves.
    I said "Think you might want to wait before you do that because you might want to Re-think those shelves.! Why.? he asked.. . . . Because when this thing starts to boogie your Mrs will think you are having a rock concert in here.!... At which he laughed and that was it. So show him the ropes and I left it with him an set off home.!

    Four hours later the phone rang and the voice said " I thought you meant a Rock disco because of the noise, not that fact it would rock the shed, Now I get what you meant about Re-thinking the shelves. My Mrs come running into the workshop to see what the matter was because from the kitchen window all she could see was the shed rocking from side to side" . . .

    The next time I went all the shelves had gone and the "Workshop" was substantially reinforced on the outside with buttress's . . .

    And on the powerful theme, I've got another "Shed" story.!

    This time with a larger machine 4 x 4 router. This shed was a real beast of a shed, concrete floor, railway sleepers for corner posts and structural beams with plywood lined insulted walls with front and rear up and over doors, proper deluxe Shed.!... So no comments from me this time about the shelves but because he wanted the machine right up to the rear door I warned him about watching what he left on the machine bed because if it wasn't fastened down and the gantry caught it that it could shove it through the door. His reply being, I want it there so I can have the door up when using for feeding long stock thru.!. . . Ok, no problem but just watch it because it won't take prisoners.!! . . . . He no longer has a rear up and over door but now has a wall with a large Cat flap due to the fact the machine shoved a sheet of MDF off the bed and through the closed door ejecting both into the garden...
    Last edited by JAZZCNC; 10-02-2021 at 09:25 PM.
    -use common sense, if you lack it, there is no software to help that.

    Email: dean@jazzcnc.co.uk

    Web site: www.jazzcnc.co.uk

  4. #24
    He should have tried my concrete feet idea! Anyhow, apart from the usual bit holder, colett holder, box etc, here is my first proper effort. Lots of learning points to get me moving from acceptable to perfection but I’m now on the journey!

    Click image for larger version. 

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  6. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by Pilsbury View Post
    He should have tried my concrete feet idea! Anyhow, apart from the usual bit holder, colett holder, box etc, here is my first proper effort. Lots of learning points to get me moving from acceptable to perfection but Iím now on the journey!

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Well, Sir all I can say is Wow, with only a week's experience using a CNC machine you should be massively proud of that and I can't wait to see what's rolling off in a year's time. .
    -use common sense, if you lack it, there is no software to help that.

    Email: dean@jazzcnc.co.uk

    Web site: www.jazzcnc.co.uk

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  8. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by Pilsbury View Post
    He should have tried my concrete feet idea! Anyhow, apart from the usual bit holder, colett holder, box etc, here is my first proper effort. Lots of learning points to get me moving from acceptable to perfection but I’m now on the journey!

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	2646A1AD-639E-44F5-BC8D-6DE9C2F736A4.jpeg 
Views:	276 
Size:	1.76 MB 
ID:	29523
    I'll add a 'Wow!' of my own, that's brilliant. I know the Aztec calendar is a popular test but it's the ability to cut out pieces like this that will fit together properly that really tests the accuracy of your machine's geometry. I'm hoping my own contraption will perform reasonably well in this respect once I finish putting it back together.

    Re the vibration: it's the accelerations that cause the trouble (apart from shoving sheets of MDF through doors, of course). Different control software has different properties re how much 'jerk' you get, something to do with how many derivatives of the rate-of-change of direction you put in the maths. I was never that hot on calculus. Reducing accleration settings will reduce the gyrations but slow down your cutting of complex shapes.
    An optimist says the glass is half full, a pessimist says the glass is half empty, an engineer says you're using the wrong sized glass.

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  10. #27
    I don't know if it is wise to bolt down a machine which has so much in the way of forces moving around on a horizontal plane, or whether vibration mounts are better. What do the big boys do? ???

    I have my pillar drill and Lathe bolted down with M12 studding resin bonded into a 6" thick concrete floor slab, but they don't wallop around the workshop that much.

    Cheers,

    Rob

  11. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by cropwell View Post
    I don't know if it is wise to bolt down a machine which has so much in the way of forces moving around on a horizontal plane, or whether vibration mounts are better. What do the big boys do? ???

    I have my pillar drill and Lathe bolted down with M12 studding resin bonded into a 6" thick concrete floor slab, but they don't wallop around the workshop that much.

    Cheers,

    Rob
    Not sure either. I wasn’t planning on bolting. The frame itself is very solid and I believe the rocking will be massively better if I can isolate out my less than solid shed floor. If I bolted to my shed floor I think it would be the same. Spring is in that. The feet make solid contact.

  12. #29
    Lovely inlay in that end grain chopping board, Pilsbury. As Kitwin says also a pretty good test of the machine too. What sort of feeds and speeds did you try?

    My workshop is brick, with concrete floor, though overlayed with polystyrene, chipboard and lino flooring. Think I will see how it fairs on a bench (something like this) before lifting floors or bolting to wall. ( No mine will not come with the stand)

    Thanks for sharing
    Andrew

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  14. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by Andrewg View Post
    Lovely inlay in that end grain chopping board, Pilsbury. As Kitwin says also a pretty good test of the machine too. What sort of feeds and speeds did you try?

    My workshop is brick, with concrete floor, though overlayed with polystyrene, chipboard and lino flooring. Think I will see how it fairs on a bench (something like this) before lifting floors or bolting to wall. ( No mine will not come with the stand)

    Thanks for sharing
    Andrew
    The 3mm EM I ran at 18000rpm and 3000mm/min. 3mm deep cut. Seemed to sound fine to me. But really I have no clue what I’m listening for��. The 15^v bit again 3mm cut and 18000rpm but lowered to 2000mm/minute. Absolutely zero method to my madness!

    I hate to poop on your parade, but in my limited opinion, that bench won’t cut it unless you brace the hell out of it. This thing shifts it’s weight around something chronic!

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