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  1. #11
    Sure was the PC. After an hour of loading and then 4 hours of not responding I bailed. My decent pc did the whole calculation in 20 seconds.

    I do however think I’ve gone far too small on the tool. A 0.25mm ball nose end mill with an 8% step over is daft. No wonder I’m 32 hours in, 3.5m lines of g code and half way through

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Pilsbury View Post
    Yes. I spotted that. Just an error in setting the time calc. Machine is set for 3000mm/min.
    No, the machine's Rapid velocity is set at 10,000mm/min, in testing it reached over double this but we throttle it back to keep things sensible. 23,000mm/min is a little scary for new users on a small machine.
    -use common sense, if you lack it, there is no software to help that.

    Email: dean@jazzcnc.co.uk

    Web site: www.jazzcnc.co.uk

  3. #13
    I remember you saying Dean. What I meant by machine is set at 3000mm/min is what I’ve set the feed rate for this particular cut. Lord knows why, just seemed a good number

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Pilsbury View Post
    I remember you saying Dean. What I meant by machine is set at 3000mm/min is what I’ve set the feed rate for this particular cut. Lord knows why, just seemed a good number
    Ah, we are talking apples and pears then.!

    To be honest with 3D work if you set a high feed rate you will rarely achieve that feed rate, esp in the Z-axis, because the moves are so short so it doesn't have time to accelerate to the set feed rate before the next move comes along. If you watch the Actual feed DRO and you'll see how high it gets compared to the commanded feed rate.

    So in actual fact, if doing mostly 3D work then you would tune the motors differently so they are biased to have a higher acceleration with a lower velocity, this way the machine accelerates faster between moves, and a higher feed rate is reached before the next move comes along. The best way to do this is to have a separate profile set up with the motors tuned for higher acceleration and call it 3D work.
    The time saving can be quite dramatic because if you are shaving off just fractions of a second per move then multiply this by millions of moves and you can easily turn this into hours in saved time. The only downside to setting a high acceleration is that if go too high the machine can become very jerky or if overdone even cause missed steps (but in your case because you have closed-loop motors this won't happen, well it could but would cause an error so won't get very far.!) . . . Like everything there is a limit or price to pay.!
    -use common sense, if you lack it, there is no software to help that.

    Email: dean@jazzcnc.co.uk

    Web site: www.jazzcnc.co.uk

  5. #15
    I wouldn't go for a new PC, although this might help with the speed. However, what I would do instead is update your Windows. You have to keep your software up to date. You should also run a disk cleanup, and you can do it either manually or get some sort of software that can do it for you quicker. You could also defragment your hard drive, even though it might be challenging to do it yourself. But I reckon the guys from Salvagedata could help. I've used their services to recover some lost data, and they did a perfect job.
    Last edited by federed; 26-04-2022 at 11:09 AM.

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