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  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by terry1956 View Post
    I purchased a fog buster from American some time back. Save your money. Itís a next to useless bit of kit. In the end I made my own using a water filter and some fittings from eBay. Cost less then £25. The fog buster sits under the work bench collecting dust.
    Have you considered that you might have set it up or been using it wrong.? There are 1000's of users around the world using them that think they are great, me included. We use ours every day and it does exactly what it says on the tin! It gives minimal quantity lube without the fog or mist.
    -use common sense, if you lack it, there is no software to help that.

    Email: dean@jazzcnc.co.uk

    Web site: www.jazzcnc.co.uk

  2. #12
    No it was set up correctly. The one I made works so much better.

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by terry1956 View Post
    No it was set up correctly. The one I made works so much better.
    In what way does it work better.?
    -use common sense, if you lack it, there is no software to help that.

    Email: dean@jazzcnc.co.uk

    Web site: www.jazzcnc.co.uk

  4. #14
    It’s much more controlled. The fog buster from the states cost just over £200 in all. It came with 4 foot of tube between the coolant tank and the nozzle. Not much for a milling machine, ok for a lathe. The fitting got the nozzle tube was cheaply made and always slipped. The fog buster I made cost a total of £30. It allowed two nozzles to be used at the same time allowing good chip removal. And I also had a air blast gun included. Building your own is an easy job. I have now gone over to flood coolant.

  5. Quote Originally Posted by terry1956 View Post
    It’s much more controlled. The fog buster from the states cost just over £200 in all. It came with 4 foot of tube between the coolant tank and the nozzle. Not much for a milling machine, ok for a lathe. The fitting got the nozzle tube was cheaply made and always slipped. The fog buster I made cost a total of £30. It allowed two nozzles to be used at the same time allowing good chip removal. And I also had a air blast gun included. Building your own is an easy job. I have now gone over to flood coolant.
    Hi Terry
    Do you have a photo you could post for forumites to see ? It might help others rig something up.
    Cheers
    Andrew

  6. #16
    Sorry it went with the machine. My current mill uses flood coolant

  7. Hi Terry
    Maybe a hint on how you went about it ??
    Cheers
    Andrew

  8. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by terry1956 View Post
    Itís much more controlled. The fog buster from the states cost just over £200 in all. It came with 4 foot of tube between the coolant tank and the nozzle. Not much for a milling machine, ok for a lathe. The fitting got the nozzle tube was cheaply made and always slipped. The fog buster I made cost a total of £30. It allowed two nozzles to be used at the same time allowing good chip removal. And I also had a air blast gun included. Building your own is an easy job. I have now gone over to flood coolant.
    Ye that's ok for you but some people like me, where time is money, haven't got time to mess around sourcing and building add-on's and calling a product next to useless just because it doesn't live up to what you need isn't really fair IMO.
    The fogger buster does exactly what says it does and works very well, if you have a need for extra pipe length or more nozzles then that's for you to ask or request, but for anyone who just wants a hassle-free setup then it does work very well.
    -use common sense, if you lack it, there is no software to help that.

    Email: dean@jazzcnc.co.uk

    Web site: www.jazzcnc.co.uk

  9. #19
    I wonder whether this is a function of what work you're doing?

    I have cut exactly one part with the fogbuster - but it was a 2D aluminium part with some deep grooves and 1mm step down. FB worked good for this - air blew the chips out of the grooves and a tiny blast of IPA gave enough cooling and lubrication to improve the finish. It was all getting quite gummy with a dreadful burr and horrible finish until I turned the IPA on. This is on a little mill.

    But if I was hogging hard steel or titanium like a boss on a huge spindle I might wish for a big hose and pump and industrial levels of coolant. Physics maybe? I had a big 'duh' moment when I saw NYCCNC doing calcs that included spindle power. Yeah, of course it matters.

    Alan

  10. #20
    Each to their own,

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