. .
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
  1. Looking good Ben, you seem to be getting to grips with it quick enough, those feeds n speeds look nicely dialed in with a good balance between speed and sanding regards the step over(scallop) with the ball-nose cutter.

    Can't wait to hear it played..
    -use common sense, if you lack it, there is no software to help that.

    Email: dean@jazzcnc.co.uk

    Web site: www.jazzcnc.co.uk

  2. #12
    Kitwn's Avatar
    Lives in Don, Tasmania, Australia. Last Activity: 4 Hours Ago Has been a member for 3-4 years. Has a total post count of 933. Received thanks 106 times, giving thanks to others 48 times. Referred 1 members to the community.
    Quote Originally Posted by BeeceUK View Post
    Hi there and thanks !!

    I've got a mix of hardware for the guitar. Pickups are Seymour Duncan, tuners are kluson. For the bridge and tailpiece I will either use Faber or Gotoh parts. Then various plastic parts I have sourced from different places. I have also cut out the back cavity covers for the guitar myself out of black ABS.

    I need to get a bit of a wiggle on with it really as it is going to be a gift for my brothers 40th birthday at the end of September. It will take a few weeks for the lacquer to cure after I spray it. But for that I will need a compressor and spray gun and a crash course on how to use them
    What a fabulous present! I wish I had a brother like you.

    Kit

    PS But I do have a very lovely sister. Just in case she's reading this.
    An optimist says the glass is half full, a pessimist says the glass is half empty, an engineer says you're using the wrong sized glass.

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by JAZZCNC View Post
    Looking good Ben, you seem to be getting to grips with it quick enough, those feeds n speeds look nicely dialed in with a good balance between speed and sanding regards the step over(scallop) with the ball-nose cutter.

    Can't wait to hear it played..
    Cheers Dean, I think its running at 4200mm/min in that video, seems to be fine running the finishing passes at that speed, Im sure I could turn it up a few % more as well. Only takes a couple of minutes to knock the scallops off and sand it down.

    Sadly being left hand I wont even be able to play it myself but Ill make sure to get some videos of my brother playing it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Kitwn View Post
    What a fabulous present! I wish I had a brother like you.

    Kit

    PS But I do have a very lovely sister. Just in case she's reading this.
    Hes a very patient brother too, I initially promised I would make him one 4 years ago !!

    Good things ( hopefully ) come to those who wait ;)

  4. #14
    Hi Ben

    Nice to see your work. I'm in talks with Dean at the moment regarding a CNC machine for me to make jazz guitars. A similar process in some ways to a Les Paul.

    I noticed you have a lot of tooling marks left on the neck and further bits to sand, could I ask why that is?

    I'm hoping that I can do necks with less work left after machining but I might be unrealistic about what I can achieve.

    Issues for me would be that jazz guitars don't have have wings glued to the headstock and the heel is taller.

    So without sounding like an arse, are the issues (you may not see it that way) you have purely down to lack of experience, or is it simply as you state, easier for you to do more post sanding. I'm hoping to do asa little sanding as possible as this adds in a margin of error and lack of repeatability.

    Also how well did carving the top of the body go? Did you have to do a lot of post sanding to get rid of tooling marks or was it pretty much good to go?

    Cheers

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Archy View Post
    Hi Ben

    Nice to see your work. I'm in talks with Dean at the moment regarding a CNC machine for me to make jazz guitars. A similar process in some ways to a Les Paul.

    I noticed you have a lot of tooling marks left on the neck and further bits to sand, could I ask why that is?

    I'm hoping that I can do necks with less work left after machining but I might be unrealistic about what I can achieve.

    Issues for me would be that jazz guitars don't have have wings glued to the headstock and the heel is taller.

    So without sounding like an arse, are the issues (you may not see it that way) you have purely down to lack of experience, or is it simply as you state, easier for you to do more post sanding. I'm hoping to do asa little sanding as possible as this adds in a margin of error and lack of repeatability.

    Also how well did carving the top of the body go? Did you have to do a lot of post sanding to get rid of tooling marks or was it pretty much good to go?

    Cheers
    Hi Archy,

    That neck was finished with a 1mm steover parallel pass. I could have quite easily set it to something lower but it would increase machining time. Hell, I could have set it to 0.1mm stepover but personally I dont see the point. You are going to be sanding the neck anyways, It may appear to you like there are alot of machining marks, but 120 grit sandpaper will have that neck smooth in a matter of minutes. Plus, with something like a neck it is going to be refined further before completion, the shoulders of the neck will need blending with the fretboard as I have left the neck a little wide to give me a bit of wiggle room when glueing the fretboard on.
    The top carve went really well. I believe on that I ran a "Morphed Spiral" operation from fusion 360 and in that instance set my stepover to 0.5mm as the top is maple so a bit more effort to sand. At 0.5mm stepover you would have needed a magnifying glass to see the scallops.

    regards

    Ben

  6. Quote Originally Posted by Archy View Post
    I noticed you have a lot of tooling marks left on the neck and further bits to sand, could I ask why that is?

    I'm hoping that I can do necks with less work left after machining but I might be unrealistic about what I can achieve.

    Issues for me would be that jazz guitars don't have have wings glued to the headstock and the heel is taller.

    So without sounding like an arse, are the issues (you may not see it that way) you have purely down to lack of experience, or is it simply as you state, easier for you to do more post sanding. I'm hoping to do asa little sanding as possible as this adds in a margin of error and lack of repeatability.
    First, let me say this post isn't intended to sway your buying decision because by now after speaking with you at length I'd like to think you realise I that's not my style or way.!

    The surface finish you can achieve is all down to the size and step over amount, mostly this is a trade-off between time and effort in sanding. With a small stepover, you will get a finish that is perfectly smooth. However, the cycle time could quite easily quadruple or more. But it's certainly possible to get a perfectly smooth finish.

    This trade-off between step-over and sanding is why in my post congratulating Ben I said "you seem to be getting to grips with it quick enough, those feeds n speeds look nicely dialed in with a good balance between speed and sanding regards the step over(scallop)" The time saved in machine time compared to the small amount of extra sanding required is in my opinion worth it provided it's used in the right areas.

    This is the beauty of CNC and having your own in-house machine, you can decide where the accuracy warrants a smaller step-over and where you can tolerate a little more sanding to lower overall build time. Plus you can tweak fit etc.

    Like most things in manufacturing, Quality is a trade-off between time and effort. CNC just allows you to choose how much of each you save.
    -use common sense, if you lack it, there is no software to help that.

    Email: dean@jazzcnc.co.uk

    Web site: www.jazzcnc.co.uk

  7. The Following User Says Thank You to JAZZCNC For This Useful Post:


  8. #17
    Well Ive been continuing to work on the guitar. Pretty much all the CNC side of things was completed at the last update and its on to more "traditional" methods of guitar construction . Hence the slowdown in productivity !! ;)

    Ive bound the body and drilled all the holes on the guitar body as well as installing the bushings and ground wire and added a round over on the back.

    Glued the "wings" to the headstock as well as a maple veneer. Shaped the headstock, drilled for tuners and added a logo inlay as well which was cut on the CNC out of the same cellulose nitrate material used for the fretboard inlays.

    Fingerboard is now glued to the neck and its pretty much ready to glue the neck into the body, just keeping them apart for now as its easier to work on each piece individually.

    Once glued itll be finish sanding and then onto finishing ( as long as the weather plays ball and I can find a window of opportunity with low humidity ) .

    Hopefully will have something to update you all with in a couple of weeks when I start on the finishing as long as the weather and humidity play ball ) ....

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	reclaim 1.jpg 
Views:	32 
Size:	172.3 KB 
ID:	30486

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	reclaim 2.jpg 
Views:	34 
Size:	184.3 KB 
ID:	30487

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	reclaim 3.jpg 
Views:	28 
Size:	187.6 KB 
ID:	30488

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	reclaim 4.jpg 
Views:	30 
Size:	197.8 KB 
ID:	30489

  9. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to BeeceUK For This Useful Post:


  10. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by BeeceUK View Post
    Well Ive been continuing to work on the guitar. Pretty much all the CNC side of things was completed at the last update and its on to more "traditional" methods of guitar construction . Hence the slowdown in productivity !! ;)

    Ive bound the body and drilled all the holes on the guitar body as well as installing the bushings and ground wire and added a round over on the back.

    Glued the "wings" to the headstock as well as a maple veneer. Shaped the headstock, drilled for tuners and added a logo inlay as well which was cut on the CNC out of the same cellulose nitrate material used for the fretboard inlays.

    Fingerboard is now glued to the neck and its pretty much ready to glue the neck into the body, just keeping them apart for now as its easier to work on each piece individually.

    Once glued itll be finish sanding and then onto finishing ( as long as the weather plays ball and I can find a window of opportunity with low humidity ) .

    Hopefully will have something to update you all with in a couple of weeks when I start on the finishing as long as the weather and humidity play ball ) ....

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	reclaim 1.jpg 
Views:	32 
Size:	172.3 KB 
ID:	30486

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	reclaim 2.jpg 
Views:	34 
Size:	184.3 KB 
ID:	30487

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	reclaim 3.jpg 
Views:	28 
Size:	187.6 KB 
ID:	30488

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	reclaim 4.jpg 
Views:	30 
Size:	197.8 KB 
ID:	30489
    Great Job Ben

    Did you use the Tom Bartlett plans as a base for the guitar design ? If you ever want to sell the machining files please let me know. I'll have died from old age before I figure out 3d design software !!!
    Cheers
    Andrew
    Ps Northwest guitars do a good nitrocellulose laquer as wel as Morrells

  11. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by the great waldo View Post
    Great Job Ben

    Did you use the Tom Bartlett plans as a base for the guitar design ? If you ever want to sell the machining files please let me know. I'll have died from old age before I figure out 3d design software !!!
    Cheers
    Andrew
    Ps Northwest guitars do a good nitrocellulose laquer as wel as Morrells
    Hi,

    I didn't create this model myself, I purchased it off a guy on GrabCAD. It comes as STEP files which I loaded into Fusion 360 and from there generated toolpaths. Even with the STEP files however, Ive had to play around with the models a bit in order to correctly generate toolpaths.

    A bit like you perhaps, I find the the 3D modelling can be a tricky bugger, Im currently enrolled on a level 2 Parametric Modelling course at a local college and have successfully modelled a couple of guitars myself in fusion ( telecaster , les paul junior ) but the top carve of a Les Paul is a seemingly simple thing to do but a bugger I've found when I have tried so far.

    I have chatted with the chap who created the files and yes it is based off Tom Bartletts 59 plans. Ive actually got a few sets of Toms paper plans kicking around from when I built without the CNC.

    You're the second person to recommend Morells lacquer to me. I was planning on using Dartfords from Rothko and Frost but will have to check out Morells. To do the sunburst I plan on mixing up Aniline dyes to do the burst and hopefully fade it back in the sun.

  12. #20
    Hi Ben

    That'll be from Matt then. I bought a set of files from him as well. I'll have a crack at running them through fusion. If you get analine powder dyes from lockwood they fade really fast in the sun. Although the sun here in Austria can be more intense than in the UK. I really prefer to use the stewmac colortone liquid dyes as the colour you get tends to not bleach out. Sun exposure can be a bit hit or miss and unpredictable. The reds do tend to fade fast. You could try a mix of both analine and colortone liquid. Plenty of info on the https://www.mylespaul.com/forum/luthiers-corner.26/
    Anyway great job so far with Deans (Jazzs') machine it all looks really good.
    Cheers
    Andrew

  13. The Following User Says Thank You to the great waldo For This Useful Post:


Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Further Progress with my JazzCNC .. Guitar Body
    By BeeceUK in forum Woodworking Project Showcase
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 23-04-2021, 05:25 AM
  2. NEW MEMBER: Guitar Building CNC Newbie
    By BeeceUK in forum New Member Introductions
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: 26-09-2020, 04:04 PM
  3. Jazzcnc, the right choice in a custom made machine
    By alex wight in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 18-10-2016, 06:39 PM
  4. NEW MEMBER: Newbie seeking CNC info for guitar building
    By rusty999 in forum New Member Introductions
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 15-01-2016, 01:26 PM
  5. NEW MEMBER: CNC and other Machine Building Berlin
    By Andikid in forum New Member Introductions
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 07-10-2010, 10:30 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •