. .
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
  1. #11
    Thanks for devoting your morning to this!

    I'm still stuck.

    Giving the Sprint Board 100V AC and switched the jumper to 110V
    On the F- and F+ pins I get 90V DC
    On the A- and A+ I get about 3V
    The reference voltage of 10V is there on pin 1
    But putting this 10V on the input pin (pin 3) makes no difference to either output
    I have the Run pin 5 connected to COM

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by jolyonjenkins View Post
    Thanks for devoting your morning to this!

    I'm still stuck.

    Giving the Sprint Board 100V AC and switched the jumper to 110V
    On the F- and F+ pins I get 90V DC
    On the A- and A+ I get about 3V
    The reference voltage of 10V is there on pin 1
    But putting this 10V on the input pin (pin 3) makes no difference to either output
    I have the Run pin 5 connected to COM
    This is how it looks to me.
    The circuit on pins 1,2,3 are basically a diagram of a 10k 3pin manual potentiometer.
    P1= 10v into pot (to power pot)
    P2= 0v from pot (vmin)
    P3= the pot wiper (0-10v variation)

    This tells me that if you have control board with it's own 0-10v & GND outputs for spindle control.... You would omit the 10v pin1 and put the GND on pin 2 and the 0-10v on pin3.

    Next is P4 & P5. This looks to be to switch it on. Power comes from P5 logic, through switch, back to P4.
    You need spindle on/off relay or switch here. If you just bridge it alone to get it active it may just throw up an overload error. (bit like on my sieg X2).


    Now bear in mind I have only looked at this very briefly and have no guarantee.
    Last edited by dazp1976; 09-12-2021 at 08:21 PM.

  3. #13
    Yes so that's pretty much what I've got except that I assumed that if I connected P1 direct to P3, I would get the maximum output voltage. However P3 doesn't seem to respond to different voltages
    I take your point that powering it up with P5 and P4 connected may cause a problem.
    I'm puzzled why I get the 90V on the "field" pins and not the "armature" pins, but that's because I don't really understand how motors work. As far as I can tell, the motor only has an armature winding.
    However, I cannot do any more on this for next week. Thanks for your help so far

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by jolyonjenkins View Post
    I'm puzzled why I get the 90V on the "field" pins and not the "armature" pins, but that's because I don't really understand how motors work. As far as I can tell, the motor only has an armature winding.
    I don't think it works without being switched on via 4&5.
    Regarding the motor. Look around at information about...
    'Armature controlled dc motor'... For both 2 and 4 wire / pole.
    Field is the stator and armature is the main rotor.

    What about the original motor?. Is that 2 or 4 wire?.

    I'll do some reading as well and see if I come up with anything else.
    I looked at sherline regarding a replacement motor but due to micromill being originally built as a manual pot... They supply it with a pre-wired little box that has a pot control on it. Not very useful really.


    I'm in process of changing into using a proper AC servo on my medium sized mill atm.
    I'd have likely got fed up with the Denford by now and considered swapping the motor out to a servo system for it.
    Last edited by dazp1976; 10-12-2021 at 12:01 AM.

  5. #15
    m_c's Avatar
    Lives in East Lothian, United Kingdom. Last Activity: 8 Hours Ago Forum Superstar, has done so much to help others, they deserve a medal. Has been a member for 9-10 years. Has a total post count of 2,745. Received thanks 331 times, giving thanks to others 8 times.
    If your motor only has two wires, then it's a permanent magnet motor, so you can just ignore the field supply, as it's only for if you have a wound field motor, which needs a continuous supply to create the stationary magnetic fields.

    Bridging the Run/Com, with a jumper between I/P and +10V should then get the motor spinning.

    One thing not clear from all the posts, is do you have a motor connected?


    And just in case you're not aware, unless you have an isolated drive, all the logic terminals float around 50% of the input voltage. At 110VAC it's not too much of an issue for yourself, but it'll kill any non-isolated electronics you connect to them.
    Avoiding the rubbish customer service from AluminiumWarehouse since July '13.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Boxford 160 TCL -Lenze 534 DC motor Driver Board
    By JohnnyK in forum General Electronics
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 01-09-2021, 09:22 AM
  2. Sprint 400i DC motor controller wiring
    By Ross77 in forum Spindles & Drive Motors
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 16-09-2017, 08:19 PM
  3. Driver and board recommendations
    By sternfox in forum Motor Drivers & Controllers
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 25-09-2016, 07:16 PM
  4. WANTED: Routout CNC Driver Board 2.5 amp Single
    By fozziebear40 in forum Items Wanted
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 29-03-2012, 06:36 PM
  5. New SCR driver board, or new motor & VFD?
    By m_c in forum Motor Drivers & Controllers
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 04-11-2010, 04:16 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •