Thread: Router Cutters

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  1. #11
    jonm's Avatar
    Location unknown. Last Activity: 19-06-2011 Has been a member for 7-8 years. Has a total post count of 89.
    george
    the rdg tools are all hss cutters, better to go a few quid more for carbide. better cut , last longer

  2. #12
    The thing is....carbide is for hardened steel and HSS should last pretty well for plastics and wood so whats the use in buying a more expensive endmill if thats all its cutting? providing the cut is in stages and not too deep each pass they should be up to the job.

    Its the same with normal wood router bits,the more passes you use the less chance of the bit burning out in a short time.

  3. #13
    Root thru this chaps offerings for small carbide router bits, very easy to deal with and cheap postage from the US. His stock changes all the time.

    http://shop.ebay.co.uk/jtg1969/m.htm...&_trksid=p3686

    For full sized cutters, I use this chap all the time. Postage for an order usually comes to around a tenner (depends on weight), delivered within about 10 days, and always sends them as a gift. Never had to pay duty yet.

    http://richontools.com/index.php?mai...index&cPath=15


    Bogs

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by GeorgeD View Post
    The thing is....carbide is for hardened steel and HSS should last pretty well for plastics and wood so whats the use in buying a more expensive endmill if thats all its cutting? providing the cut is in stages and not too deep each pass they should be up to the job.

    Its the same with normal wood router bits,the more passes you use the less chance of the bit burning out in a short time.

    Not quite true George, although they are softer than steel, some materials are very abrasive and will eat HSS is short order, Tufnol is a plastic but believe me a carbide cutter will outlast 7 or 8 HSS ones.

    Printed circuit board is another, on a decent sized board you will be lucky if one HSS isn't burnt out at the end and it not all about deep or aggressive cuts.

    When cutting softer materials the trick is to get the chips away to stop secondary cutting and clogging, this is where single flute cutters score as they have the most clearance of any cutter and most single flute cutters these days are carbide.
    John S -

  5. #15
    jonm's Avatar
    Location unknown. Last Activity: 19-06-2011 Has been a member for 7-8 years. Has a total post count of 89.
    george
    majority of normal router bits are carbide . you say hss bits " should be up to the job" do you have a cnc router up and running to try out hss v's carbide
    or are you just guessing . cutting wood carbide will outlast hss , hence its cheaper in the long run

  6. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by GeorgeD View Post
    The thing is....carbide is for hardened steel
    You'll find in industry that carbide tools are used in various grades, geometries, coatings etc. for cutting just about any material you can think of, not just hardened steel.

  7. #17
    i machine semi profesionally.
    i use all types of cutters depending on the job
    high speed steel is great when cutting softwoods as you can get a sharper edge to the blade. cutting speed/chip load being correct or the blade will dull very quickly.absolutely useless on mdf , laminates and some hardwoods, they are so abrasive the cutter will be blunt in no time.
    carbide tipped. great for general work on softwoods, hardwoods, mdf etc. the cheapies are ok and are considered disposable, however if you get some cheap diamond card files (about 2 off ebay) you can redress the edge a few times. (ive had more trouble with shanks snapping than blades blunting)
    Solid carbide. the same sort of finish but seem a lot more durable. i have 3 roughing spirals i use daily which give a very nice finish and will cut through anything!
    pcd. (diamond) cost a fortune to buy but will outlast anything as long as you dont drop them etc! ive had one 45degree chamfer cutter on my big router for 3 years cutting edges every day on laminates, hardwoods.
    the worst thing for any cutter is running it at the wrong feed speed (too slow) this causes a heat build up and can kill any of them quickly. a lot of my tooling requires feed speeds of 5 to 8 metres per minute!
    this is an example of correct cutting speed with a 12mm spiral in oak.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8O391...eature=related
    obviously a lot of hobby machines wont run this fast and require smaller tooling. (this is my hobby machine just been converted to mach 3 ) when you find your not breaking tools any more and you want some extremely sharp top quality cutters have a look at itc tooling. search google
    they are not cheap (approx 20 for a 2mm cutter but the quality is superb)

  8. Recommendations please for UK sources of V-point router bits (with a real sharp point - I've got plenty with a 'flat' point) suitable for engraving oak. Many thanks.

    I think I'm looking for something like this: http://www.amazon.com/CMT-858-001-11.../dp/B000P4NSYG.

  9. #19
    titman or itc are the best. both very sharp and last ages

  10. #20
    I've never had a problem with trend router bits, only used wood cutting blades. I know they are not cheap but you do get what you pay for

    James

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