Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by FatFreddie View Post
    My approach would be to turn the pointy bit and then basically part off the lightly curved face first roughing a relief down to maybe 10mm dia and then finishing the face and parting off the final 10mm in one go - if you get the tool shape right it should work ok.

    Anywhere near? :-)
    Maybe, getting warm :lol:

    It will make it interesting for those that watch but do not participate in the threads to see how various minds work.

    The piece is 48mm diameter and will not go through the headstock of my lathe.

    So material cost has to be considered, it is not a secret in how i did it but just a bit of fun not to give the game away too easily. But i will let on if anyone gets close to my method.

    Phil

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Jonathan View Post
    Hmm, so did you machine them all in one operation? Or are you not disclosing how :naughty: I saw the other thread about it here a while ago.

    By cylindrical I mean mine were just prisms. I did it in the lathe by offsetting the center and machining it three times.


    Exactly - now use two pieces of perspex. That would be even more impressive.
    Jonathan i have never heard anyone call a prism cylindrical before. :lol:

    I would have tried rolling them on two pieces of perspex but as i made them for a customer i can't really get them all scratched can i.

    They are on a thick towel as i was using a glass table and didn't want to explain to her indoors about any accidents. :whistling:

    Phil

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by z3t4 View Post
    Thanks Phil & Steve. The video is brilliant!
    More here on these curves.
    HTH
    John
    John Thanks for the comments and the link.

    Phil

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by M250cnc View Post
    Jonathan i have never heard anyone call a prism cylindrical before. :lol:

    I would have tried rolling them on two pieces of perspex but as i made them for a customer i can't really get them all scratched can i.

    They are on a thick towel as i was using a glass table and didn't want to explain to her indoors about any accidents. :whistling:

    Phil
    Nor have I heard anyone call a solid of constant width a cylinder, but nevermind - I should have chosen a better word!

    They must be aluminum then if there's a risk of getting them scratched.

    Still thinking ...

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Jonathan View Post
    Nor have I heard anyone call a solid of constant width a cylinder, but nevermind - I should have chosen a better word!

    They must be aluminum then if there's a risk of getting them scratched.

    Still thinking ...
    Jonathan, Steve Mould called them Constants of Solid Width, i call em thingamabobs.

    You are correct in that they are made from Aluminium.

    They are very round as you can see from this poor photo, so cylindrical to me. :lol:

    Phil
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Cylinder.jpg 
Views:	231 
Size:	20.1 KB 
ID:	3641  
    Last edited by M250cnc; 21-01-2011 at 04:58 PM.

  6. #16
    Maybe when parting off you held the piece in a revolving chuck in the tailstock. That would still leave a mark, so take that chuck and put it on the spindle and machine the other side? It should still be on center so that could work ... probably something a bit more ingenious though

    Possible some sort of turning between centers was used ('save material').

    I guess the question to ask is was it all machined in one operation or not?
    Last edited by Jonathan; 21-01-2011 at 06:48 PM.

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by Jonathan View Post
    Maybe when parting off you held the piece in a revolving chuck in the tailstock. That would still leave a mark, so take that chuck and put it on the spindle and machine the other side? It should still be on center so that could work ... probably something a bit more ingenious though

    Possible some sort of turning between centers was used ('save material').
    Very cold. :lol:

    Quote Originally Posted by Jonathan View Post
    I guess the question to ask is was it all machined in one operation or not?
    Clues, not every one had the same operations there are some subtle differences, so you now know there is more than one operation. :naughty:

    :whistling: I'm enjoying this.

    Phil

  8. #18


    Shapes and Solids of Constant Width - Numberphile - YouTube

    this site has become youtube famous,

    who said it couldn't be done?

    and who did it in the end?

    interesting video also.
    Last edited by Lee Roberts; 12-11-2013 at 11:14 AM.

  9. #19
    WoooHooo we're famous

    .Me
    .Me

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Similar Threads

  1. Youtube/Video Channel Thread?
    By Washout in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 29-05-2014, 02:24 PM
  2. Just a little video i found
    By totts in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 18-04-2014, 09:37 AM
  3. PCB Track Width Calculator
    By irving2008 in forum General Electronics
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 10-05-2013, 02:34 PM
  4. sanity check - constant running, loads and more
    By dsc in forum Stepper & Servo Motors
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 26-11-2012, 12:26 PM
  5. Laser Diode Constant Current Driver
    By Mad Professor in forum General Electronics
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 21-07-2010, 06:01 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •