Thread: Leadscrew

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  1. #11
    Why do you need such a tight pitch? I would have thought that a standard lead screw turned slowly would be just as good.

    I will follow your build with interest because my son wants me to help him build one.

  2. #12
    Well the cutter carriage needs to travel at 2mm min and it needs to travel smoothly i.e moving all the time, so surely you need a very fine pitch lead screw to acheive this?
    I'm not 100% about this but that's the sense i make of it anyway, if thats not how it works what's the purpose of the 0.050" lead leadscrew that i saw for sale?
    And i ask again can anyone give me any leads as to info on leadscrews? books, websites whatever i just need to know more before i can make informed decisions.
    Many Thanks

  3. #13
    i2i's Avatar
    Lives in Cardiff, United Kingdom. Last Activity: 23-12-2016 Has been a member for 7-8 years. Has a total post count of 693. Received thanks 30 times, giving thanks to others 0 times.
    How about a standard screw (for quality) and a worm drive to give you a smooth reduction for the servo

  4. Well the cutter carriage needs to travel at 2mm min and it needs to travel smoothly i.e moving all the time, so surely you need a very fine pitch lead screw to acheive this?
    No, you just need to turn the screw slowly ;)

    For your application all you need is to ensure any noise (vibration) produced by the screw is not transmitted to the cutter head (making a silent slide way for the cutter is the greatest problem you will have)

    The lead screw itself need not be too special - I'd use a polished stainless steel rolled threaded rod with a PTFE nut for a home-brewed machine

    I would use a servo motor and a simple speed controller with tacho feedback (a positional servo controller is unnecessary and would add noise to you machine)

    I would use one or perhaps two stages of plain rubber belt speed reduction between the motor and lead-screw (stepper motors, gears and notch belts are noisy)

    Are you going to use vari-pitch groove cutting? (i.e. making the groove spacing wider as (before!) the signal level increases)


    Bill

  5. #15
    Thanks for your response Bill it's appreciated.
    Eventually i will use vari pitch groove spacing so this is a consideration in my design, although this will not be employed until much later since the signal monitoring and algorithm required is going to be one of the more difficult features to design. So until that time the variable groove will only be used for lead in/out grooves.
    Yes servo motor with analogue feedback is the way to go. What are the pro's and cons' of the PTFE nut that you suggest? As far as i know commercial machines are metal nuts.
    Usually a feedscrew arrangement would use a "half nut" indeed commercial recording lathes do but i'm thinking this is not essential, because of the limited travel needed (about 175mm) I could possibly do away with this, and possibly make the build easier? (fewer moving parts)
    After all why not just have an auto return carriage when the cut is finished?
    Positional repeatability is important for my design. Back to the leadscrew surely despite what you say the shorter the lead of the screw the better for my application?
    Otherwise why make such a range of leads? And whats the purpose of a 0.050" lead screw? or why would you want that over a longer lead with a slower drive? etc

  6. What are the pro's and cons' of the PTFE nut that you suggest?
    PTFE will eventually breakdown but it is quick and easy to use.

    As far as i know commercial machines are metal nuts.
    If you were making a commercial unit then it would need to last longer - bronze half nut would outlast any plastic.

    I don't think you'll need a half-nut (although it would not be difficult to make)

    Back to the leadscrew surely despite what you say the shorter the lead of the screw the better for my application?
    Otherwise why make such a range of leads? And whats the purpose of a 0.050" lead screw? or why would you want that over a longer lead with a slower drive? etc
    50 thou" pitch is a simple 20 TPI that can be cut on almost any screw cutting lathe.

    The reason for the proliferation of leads is to match the screw to the motor, drive and required speed. For a lathe that's only creeping along a fine pitch would be my choice.

    BTW if you have a manual or other details of a VMS 70 then pinch as much of the design as you can (why re-invent the wheel :))

    since the signal monitoring and algorithm required is going to be one of the more difficult features to design
    I don't think vari-pitch is particularly complicated. It just needs a delay line (or a Studer with preview heads) to give the lathe time to open the groove before a loud passage arrives.

    I used to make up U-matic digital master tapes with, if memory serves, a 300mS mono preview on the analogue tracks, this was back in the days before we had digital delay lines for the cutter preview.

  7. #17
    Thanks again for your input Bill.
    Well a VMS70 is a precision engineered unit, extremely heavy duty and cost 478 000 in 1978 and Neumann say they never made any money out of recording lathes' !! The level of engineering required to copy that design is beyond me, certainly a job for pro's. It would be cheaper to spend 10 000 on a used unit. I'm not reinventing the wheel at all, i'm simply making a new machine based on old technology. I intend to try and use off the shelf guide rails and lead screw married with a professional turntable. My new machine in a way has a new use, to be used by amateurs and DJ's etc, it needs to be built to a cost too so just nicking a pro design is not really going to give me what i need. The Neumann machine is more or less a "money is no object" super high engineer'd product designed for big buisiness.

  8. #18
    i2i's Avatar
    Lives in Cardiff, United Kingdom. Last Activity: 23-12-2016 Has been a member for 7-8 years. Has a total post count of 693. Received thanks 30 times, giving thanks to others 0 times.
    I have a question, what type of bearing are you going to use for the turntable. It will need to be supported over the whole surface and have extremely low noise levels, so low in fact that you may have trouble engineering it. Forgive me if i'm reading too much into this, but to cut a record involves physically cutting a groove in a disc. So the turntable have to be rigid to avoid any deflection when cutting and have no bearing noise (wow and flutter).

  9. Quote Originally Posted by fusionkid View Post
    Well a VMS70 is a precision engineered unit,
    I know, I've spent many a happy hour in the cutting rooms at Whitfield Street (CBS Studios in those days)

    I wasn't suggesting you copy a Neumann , just pinch the ideas e.g. the size and pitch of the lead screw & the slide-way design etc. etc.


    What type of cutter head are you planning to use? (and who on earth makes them these days???)

    It would be cheaper to spend 10 000 on a used unit
    Is that what they fetch (I'd heard that Whitfield Street's ones were dumped in a skip!)

    Quote Originally Posted by i2i
    I have a question, what type of bearing are you going to use for the turntable. It will need to be supported over the whole surface and have extremely low noise levels,
    Noise and vibration are certainly a problem, but the cutting forces are not large. I've heard of successful DIY lathes made from the older Technics DD decks, so I'm sure fusionkid will be able to make something work :) He's talking about a machine for DJs (not DMM), so surface noise will be no worse than the crap recorded :naughty:

    BTW did you know the earliest lathes (for 78s) were powered by a string and a falling weight ?

    Bill

  10. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by i2i View Post
    I have a question, what type of bearing are you going to use for the turntable. It will need to be supported over the whole surface and have extremely low noise levels, so low in fact that you may have trouble engineering it. Forgive me if i'm reading too much into this, but to cut a record involves physically cutting a groove in a disc. So the turntable have to be rigid to avoid any deflection when cutting and have no bearing noise (wow and flutter).
    I suspect the cutting forces will be quite low (is any data available?) so you can, to some extent, substitute mass for rigidity.

    For the turntable I'd think that a spindle supported on some decent quality bearings with a platform above it and then the turntable itself above that supported by some noise absorbing material would work quite well. Most of the mass should obviously be in the top part.

    Drive could then be to the spindle via a belt to isolate motor noise. A bit of tuning of the feedback loop should give you good wow (low frequency speed variation) response and the mass should sort the flutter (high (relatively) frequency speed variation) out.

    Sounds easy :lol:

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