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  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Jonathan View Post
    Maybe make it so that you can easily put the base panel back on the machine to take a tiny bit off untill it fits?
    It depends on whether it's still parallel- the accuracy is not just for ease of fitting the parts together, it's also needed to sure that the opposite edges are parallel, so that the compononent has all four corners at right angles.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jonathan View Post
    Surely you would plane the proud part down, not sand it. Shouldn't take long to plane off a mm or so.
    A decent random orbit sander is faster, and the discs can be changed quickly when they wear out. Planer blades would ned to be TCT as the material can be quite abrasive

    Quote Originally Posted by Jonathan View Post

    Have you considered making a complete CNC router ... then you can make it cut the holes rebates etc automatically.
    I have certainly thought about it, even been tempted once or twice. Holding the material down would be a problem, birch ply does not lie as flat as most kitchen cabinet materials, and a powerful vacuum pumo and system would be needed. There's also the issue of needed to learn quite a bit of software, whereas at the moment I can keep most of the numbers I need in my head, and the 8'x4' sheets to cut down in a quite logical sequence, and if one of the boards has a nasty knot in it I can easily cut around it to avoid it.

    One fo the nice things about a machine such as I described in the original post is that I would be working with digits on a screen, rather than having to read a scale, something which I have a problem with, sometimes.

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Lord Kitchener View Post
    It depends on whether it's still parallel- the accuracy is not just for ease of fitting the parts together, it's also needed to sure that the opposite edges are parallel, so that the compononent has all four corners at right angles.
    That shouldn't be a problem if you have an edge which is set precisely perpendicular to the saw to align the part against.

    Quote Originally Posted by Lord Kitchener View Post
    A decent random orbit sander is faster, and the discs can be changed quickly when they wear out.
    Fair enough ... I thought you meant sanding by hand which would be slow!

    I currently either clamp sheet material at the edges, or screw it to the bed with normal wood screws. Both methods hold it adequately and are much cheaper than a vacuum bed. The only real disadvantage is you have to leave tabs (or position the screws carefully) to stop parts you are cutting out moving. Don't be put off by the software - CAMbam free edition would do what you need and is (in my opinion) very user friendly.

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Jonathan View Post
    That shouldn't be a problem if you have an edge which is set precisely perpendicular to the saw to align the part against.
    Well, the movable fence is the reference edge, so if it doesn't move accurately, if one end moves a little further than the other, then it won't be parallel to the cutting line. An edge that was at right angles wouldn't help if it was a narrow piece, for instance 565 x 80



    Quote Originally Posted by Jonathan View Post
    I currently either clamp sheet material at the edges, or screw it to the bed with normal wood screws. Both methods hold it adequately and are much cheaper than a vacuum bed. The only real disadvantage is you have to leave tabs (or position the screws carefully) to stop parts you are cutting out moving. Don't be put off by the software - CAMbam free edition would do what you need and is (in my opinion) very user friendly.
    Well, I am still considering it, so will bear that in mind, thanks.

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Lord Kitchener View Post
    Well, the movable fence is the reference edge, so if it doesn't move accurately, if one end moves a little further than the other, then it won't be parallel to the cutting line. An edge that was at right angles wouldn't help if it was a narrow piece, for instance 565 x 80
    With a screw on both sides both ends will move the same amount .. near enough. True narrow pieces would be more tricky to trim accurately.

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