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  1. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by m_c View Post
    Don't get me started on cheap arc welders. They're horrendous to use, and produce good quality welds. Far better to spend a bit extra for a MIG, and get something easier to use and more versatile.
    Well don't get me started on cheap migs. . .Lol
    Cheap migs are usually low powered and useless for welding thick material (Above 3mm). Cheap migs come with crappy wire feeds, crappy regulators and tiny stupidly expensive gas bottles.
    If you want to weld thicker material you need high power mig with decent wire feed and larger gas bottles other wise your wasting your time with a Mig IMO. . . . .Thou I do agree they are very versatile if you have decent one.

    Cheap stick welders with decent quality rods can weld thick steel with excellent results with a little time and practice. Far better and lot cheaper than a cheap mig for thicker material.

  2. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by CraftyGeek View Post

    Regarding the brackets for creating the frame - can anyone point me in the direction of some suitable candidates?
    Just order a length of wide flat plate then mark cut to shape and size using the angle grinder with the micro thin cutting disc's I mentioned before. Very quick and easy.

    The combination of Pillar drill, Angle grinder, decent elec hand drill with a few basic tools like sharp scribes etc is all you need to make a very strong frame.

    One good piece of equipment I recommend buying is set of transfer punch's like these. . .http://www.rdgtools.co.uk/acatalog/info_1791.html
    They make transfering holes from one piece of metal to the other very accurate and easy.!! . . .Very good when making multple brackets etc.

  3. I'm liking the punch set...I think I'll get myself one of those.

    When you say micro thin cutting disk..what thickness are they? I have some 2.5mm discs already...how would they do?

    Got a quote earlier for 50mm box steel (3mm) it does work out a lot cheaper, so I'm going that route.

    Need to get the workshop sorted, then get on to designing the frame.

  4. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by CraftyGeek View Post
    When you say micro thin cutting disk..what thickness are they? I have some 2.5mm discs already...how would they do?
    Quote Originally Posted by JAZZCNC View Post
    tool and cheap thats quick for cutting steel is 1mm micro cutting disc's
    2.5mm is bad as it has to remove a greater amount of material, so the cutting force and wear on the grinder is higher and it's not as fast.

    Quote Originally Posted by CraftyGeek View Post
    Need to get the workshop sorted, then get on to designing the frame.
    Design everything before making, else you'll likely regret it.

  5. #25
    m_c's Avatar
    Lives in East Lothian, United Kingdom. Last Activity: 6 Hours Ago Has been a member for 9-10 years. Has a total post count of 1,831. Received thanks 192 times, giving thanks to others 5 times.
    Quote Originally Posted by CraftyGeek View Post
    When you say micro thin cutting disk..what thickness are they? I have some 2.5mm discs already...how would they do?
    2.5mm are the older standard thickness cutting disks. Nothing wrong with them if that's what you already have.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jonathan View Post
    2.5mm is bad as it has to remove a greater amount of material, so the cutting force and wear on the grinder is higher and it's not as fast.
    I wouldn't call them bad. They were used for many years as cutting discs.
    And how does a thicker disc increase cutting force on the grinder?
    You shouldn't be forcing the disc into the metal anyway, as all you do is cause extra heat, wear the disc quicker, and put unecessary strain on the grinder.

  6. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by m_c View Post
    I wouldn't call them bad. They were used for many years as cutting discs.
    I should have said 'worse' or 'sub-optimal' instead of bad.

    Quote Originally Posted by m_c View Post
    And how does a thicker disc increase cutting force on the grinder?
    The steel is cut by the disk generating friction which subsequently melts it away. If the disk it wider the area in contact is greater, therefore for a given feedrate you have higher friction and thus a greater force. Can also argue it with wider disk must require more power, and since power and torque are related by the simple formula, more power means more torque and if there is more torque on the disk the only way that can occur is from a greater cutting force. This site says 'thinner ones will put far less strain on your machine, create less sparks and give a quicker and cleaner cut', which is basically the same thing:

    http://www.ultimatehandyman.co.uk/Me...ting_metal.htm

    Could probably find a better reference... but not now.

  7. #27
    m_c's Avatar
    Lives in East Lothian, United Kingdom. Last Activity: 6 Hours Ago Has been a member for 9-10 years. Has a total post count of 1,831. Received thanks 192 times, giving thanks to others 5 times.
    Jonathan, do you ever think that you overthink things too much?

    If you're using a wider disc, feedrate isn't going to be the same. You could try and make it the same, but you'll need far more force than a multiple of the disc width difference, which then results in the disc wearing away quicker than it would normally (or clogging if you really push it), and most likely overheating the grinder.
    Plus using a proper grinding disc for grinding puts far higher loads on a grinder than cutting, and if you're wearing grinders out, you're either doing something majorly wrong, or you want to buy better ones.

  8. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by m_c View Post
    Jonathan, do you ever think that you overthink things too much?
    I probably just did yes, but not having used one much myself I can only really judge from theory and finding sources.

    Quote Originally Posted by m_c View Post
    feedrate isn't going to be the same. You could try and make it the same, but you'll need far more force than
    Of course...So it depends on which the limiting factor is - the force / wear on the grinder or the power output for given duty cycle.

    I'll leave it at that as I fear I'm going a bit off topic.

  9. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by CraftyGeek View Post

    When you say micro thin cutting disk..what thickness are they? I have some 2.5mm discs already...how would they do?

    Got a quote earlier for 50mm box steel (3mm) it does work out a lot cheaper, so I'm going that route.

    Need to get the workshop sorted, then get on to designing the frame.
    Well they will do if you have them but the 1mm thickness disc's really make light work of it. . . .Like these http://www.arceurotrade.co.uk/Catalo.../NEW-Abrasives
    I don't even bother using an hacksaw to cut bolts etc anymore because these are just thin as hacksaw blades and slice thru bolts in seconds with perfect cut.

    Edit: Ha ha ha . .The things we numpties will Argue over..!! . . . Thou it's nice to know it's not just me who argue's with Jonathan.!! . . . .Thou I agree with him completely on this occasion, less width = less friction obviously means less power & force required.!!. . Thats gota be a first eh Jonathan. .:lol:
    Last edited by JAZZCNC; 19-10-2011 at 10:42 PM.

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