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  1. Quote Originally Posted by JAZZCNC View Post
    You could always save some amps and weight in attic by using the fish tank pump and water for cooling the spindle.? Sure Nemo and his mates won't mind.! . . . Then when it's time for water change then use it for flood cooling. . Lol
    Many moons ago I was working at a large data centre associated with a UK bank... the cooling system for the mainframe did indeed run outside to a large bank of evaporators and the condensate was stored in fishponds which, because it was well aerated and at a controlled pleasantly warm temperature, housed a startling variety and size of tropical fish...

    On a serious note though, how thick are the joists in the attic space? Is it a sanctioned conversion or have you just migrated to it?

  2. #32
    Not as silly an idea as it might seem - if the temperature of the water from the spindle is greater than that of the tank (i.e. put in a quick op-amp circuit to compare it) you could put a heat exchanger in the tank and pump the water through that so it's an isolated system and the fish keep cosy for free.
    Last edited by Jonathan; 27-08-2012 at 08:13 PM.
    Old router build log here. New router build log here. Lathe build log here.
    Electric motorbike project here.

  3. First find out how many rings you have in the house. We have two rings and if I owned it, they would be divided further. I am US bred and we tend to put heavy appliances on their own, sockets on another (per floor or in some cases region) and lights on their own with a circuit for the garage or external al on it's own. That is there not here. So find out how many rings you have. I run the shop off the ground floor ring and as long as I don't start the washer there is no problem and I am running 4 nema 23 3.1NM steppers, AM882 drivers (4), BOB (PMDX), ESS, Computer, Lights and at times either the bandsaw or the pillar drill.

    So it really depends on how you are set up and what the circuit is set up to take. Better safe then sorry and I DO have an ABC rated fire extinguisher just inside the door to the shop. Jazz it pointing out that being on the safe side is always better then having to make regular trips all the way down stairs to rest switches.

    Michael

    Edit: well thing where going so fast that this is a near worthless post.
    Last edited by m.marino; 27-08-2012 at 09:32 PM.

  4. #34
    @Irving: The best way I can answer that is "no idea". I'm in the end-terrace for a row that go back about 100-odd years. I suspect they were built with the attics as habitable by design. Ours has actual stairs that look like they were meant to be there, and I note that all the other houses left from this row also have dormer windows - though ours were replaced with a bigger dormer at some point.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    I've stuck my reloading/"clean" bench there for the moment. Well, I say "for the moment", there's no flippin' way I'm moving it. All the benches are designed with no removal strategy other than 30 minutes with a chainsaw

    @Jonathan: Oh if I could get away with it I would be entirely up for it :D

    @Michael: I've identified which ring it is on and what sort of loads I expect on it, so I am quitely confident. Quite quietly. Whisper-like, perhaps. In fact you might need a medium with a ouija board to hear my confidence, but it's there.

  5. #35
    On a sidenote, I was rather surprised with the workbench in that photo. I put a PC on it to test something and the whole thing vibrated like a drum. I didn't really worry about sound when I built it because it's not for "noisey" stuff, but I didn't expect it to amplify the vibration and it felt like it transmitted it straight into the structure.

    Lots of experimenting to be done with isolating and dampening, I think.

  6. Quote Originally Posted by Rogue View Post
    @Irving: The best way I can answer that is "no idea". I'm in the end-terrace for a row that go back about 100-odd years. I suspect they were built with the attics as habitable by design. Ours has actual stairs that look like they were meant to be there, and I note that all the other houses left from this row also have dormer windows - though ours were replaced with a bigger dormer at some point.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    ...
    Nice bench and a period chair too ;)

    You should lift a floorboard or two and check the joist dimensions before you load the floor too much. A typical 100y old house would use 4x2 joists in the attic (my son's from 1903 does), they were never designed as habitable space but for light storage, tho it could be used for 'servants quarters' in larger houses, but the loading assumed very light (no heavy wardrobes etc.). Building regs differentiate between ceiling joists and floor joists. A 4 x 2 ceiling joist at 16" centres spanning a maximum of 8' (the width of a small room below) will support a dead load of no more than 500N/sq metre, an imposed (i.e variable) load not exceeding 250N/sq m and a concentrated temporary load not exceeding 900N. I'd hazard that you sitting at your substantial workbench is close to exceeding that.

    Building regs do not allow for more than 1250N/sq m loading, above this they need structural design/calculations agreed by building control - this is why you need building control approval for loft conversions, especially where there is a wet room or bath installation (a full bath of water with a typical male in it is close to 2500N/sq m loading).

    Again, don't want to be a spoilsport... but you don't know how the timber has faired over the years and it would be unfortunate for your new CNC build to end up in a crumpled heap on the floor below!

  7. #37
    Ye what Irving said.!!. . . And if you miss align the ball-screws it will shake the tiles off your roof has well. .

  8. #38
    Quote Originally Posted by irving2008 View Post
    Nice bench and a period chair too ;)
    If by period you mean "absolute pain in the neck for most uses" then yes. There's a stool around there somewhere that I use, but occasionally the lower seat lets me get adopt a more stable position leaning on my elbows, holding whatever I'm working on right up to the face.

    Quote Originally Posted by irving2008 View Post
    You should lift a floorboard or two and check the joist dimensions before you load the floor too much.
    More things to check! And lifting floorboards? I think I'd rather play with the mains again, there's less chance of getting into trouble

    For various reasons we've got to have some work done on one of the ceilings underneath so we'll probably have to cut away a square of the plasterboard. I assume we can get a look from underneath. Either that or I'll definately have to wait until the kids are at school and the wife is at work!

    Quote Originally Posted by irving2008 View Post
    ...scary numbers etc etc... Again, don't want to be a spoilsport... but you don't know how the timber has faired over the years and it would be unfortunate for your new CNC build to end up in a crumpled heap on the floor below!
    Nope, don't worry, I entirely appreciate the points you are making. Is it my first choice of location? No. Is it my only current realistic option for location? Yes. Adopt the guest bedroom? Take garden space to build a shed? The last time I successfully convinced my wife to do anything was when I asked her to marry me and, looking back, I'm starting to wonder if I convinced her to say "yes" or if she tricked me into asking in the first place. While I love her dearly, my jedi mindtricks don't work on her.

    I assume that if the joists are too small there's nothing I can realistically do, short of miniaturising the build or rebuilding the attic?

  9. #39
    Quote Originally Posted by JAZZCNC View Post
    Ye what Irving said.!!. . . And if you miss align the ball-screws it will shake the tiles off your roof has well. .
    The wind does that already...

  10. #40
    Quote Originally Posted by irving2008 View Post
    I'd hazard that you sitting at your substantial workbench is close to exceeding that.
    Ahh yeah, forgot to mention. I suppose this won't be helping either?

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Except now it's got a 2m long double layer of MDF (that was only a temp worktop for the picture) and a pillar drill on it...

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