Thread: Mig gas bottle.

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  1. #21
    21 years of experience certainly helps. I don't disagree that Argon/CO2 mixes can be better, but for home use, the cost far outweighs the small benefits. Mig isn't the best suited for anything less than 1mm thick. I've welded cars and sheet metal < 1mm thick but have to spot it to avoid overheating, but that's generally the case no matter what gas you use. Nowadays, I use my TIG set if I'm working with sheet metals or need better pool control. Welding rusty, galvanized or painted metal is bad practice. Preparation is everything. But you already know that.

  2. #22
    BOC and Volkszone - Gas Offer - MIG Welding Forum

    This is your best best for cost effectiveness There are many rent free deals out there but they are still not as cost effective as the volkszone offer. The deal is still live and active and you can return the bottle as and when you wish.

    You may also like to take a good read around the forum as there is a host of info on there.

    Kind regards,


  3. #23
    I did look at that a few months ago when I was looking for pure argon for my TIG set but at 43 a year rental and 32 a refill (for Argoshield...pure argon is probably more), with a 9L bottle likely to last me about 5 years, it wasn't the cheapest option. Adams Gas is more expensive at 55 deposit and 50 a refill but even if the bottle only lasts 2 years, total cost is 105 vs 118. But yes, if you're likely to empty a bottle in less than a year (which is a LOT of welding), then that BOC offer is the cheapest.

  4. Preperation is key, however not always possible given some of the repair jobs I get to tackle.

    Puresheild is a lot more expensive than Argosheild. I'm sure it was around twice the price the last time I got a refill.
    I should really return it, as I've hardly used TIG for a while, but it's still half full, and is useful for those odd jobs where MIG is no good.

  5. #25
    Must admit been subject of some debate and experimentation over the years..

    > CO2 can freeze the regulator under heavy use

    Few turns of microbore copper wound round a 60W inspection lamp bulb used to be the answer to expensive heated regulators appparently.

    >"pub" CO2 bottles

    Some `smoothflow` or something , gases have a nitrogen/CO2 mix for smaller bubbles, worth avoiding.

    Was one theory about CO2 being `rougher` than argon mixes, was possible lower temperature freezing out more atmospheric moisture into the weld.

    Big machines certainly help, being handed torch of an already set up 350A Cebora was a whole lot easier than trying to set up a Migmate 100.

    Little bottles main problem is once opened they rarely reseal properley so can cost wrong side of a tenner to make a couple of tacks.

    Fabrication welding on the bench with new stock a bit differnt from repair welding of rust to rust in a freezing lane as well ;-)

    Wire feed is one thig that sticks in memory as being much steadier on big machines, colleague used to repair machines, Oxford used to make oil-cooled copper cored welders, another world from air cooled aluminium, but another universe price wise as well.

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