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  1. #31
    So if you don't mind me asking Rick what is it you produce commercially now using either vcarve or aspire that people are buying from you.
    What sort of machine are you running? Are you running a 3 axis machine or have you apgraded it to something else.

  2. #32
    Quote Originally Posted by martin54 View Post
    So if you don't mind me asking Rick what is it you produce commercially now using either vcarve or aspire that people are buying from you.
    What sort of machine are you running? Are you running a 3 axis machine or have you apgraded it to something else.
    I started making custom parts for motorcycles. Rear sets, Yokes, Levers, and mounting items for speedos and the like just to mention a few. I dont run a comapny, I just make stuff for people who ask me, and they reimburse my costs...Hmmm.. I have three machines. A Diy 3'X2' gantry mill, a Boxford 260vMC (dead at athe moment).and anSPG 2217-III (a warco type Mill)

    Im Currently building a 7'X4' Steel frame Gantry mill..Hopefully with ATC, I have been getting Bits made by other people lately because my main ali machine is dead as i said earlier but also because i lack the time this time of year with work commitments..


    Rick
    Always bear in mind that your own resolution to succeed is more important than any other - Abe Lincoln

  3. #33
    Ger21's Avatar
    Lives in Detroit, United States. Last Activity: 2 Hours Ago Has been a member for 5-6 years. Has a total post count of 508. Received thanks 68 times, giving thanks to others 0 times. Referred 1 members to the community.
    Quote Originally Posted by wilfy View Post
    ok guys at what point does something become either 2D, 2.5D or 3D??? any examples of each??
    Generally, this refers to the toolpaths, and not the actual parts. Because unless your parts are infinitely thin, they're all 3D parts.

    2D is typically used on a machine with a manual Z axis. You set the Z axis to a specific location, and the machine only moves the X and Y axis. Since this typically only applies to very old machines, or very specialized machines, the terms 2D and 2.5D generally are referring to the same type of software, and are interchangeable imo.


    2.5D toolpaths are the most common. What 2.5D means, is that the machine will move the Z axis, but cutting is predominantly done only in the X and Y axis. Basically, the Z axis is not moving when the X and Y are. There are some minor exceptions. A lot of 2D or 2.5D cam programs can ramp into the cut, some can do helical milling of holes, and they can also do drilling.

    2D or 2.5D CAM programs generally work with 2D vector drawings. Some more expensive ones can create these 2.5D toolpaths from 3D solid models.

    3D toolpaths generally have all 3 axis (X,Y, and Z) moving at the same time when cutting. They are created from 3D models, either solid or mesh format. Generlly, the cheaper CAM packages use mesh models only, while the more expensive ones support the use of solid models. These more expensive packages are able to detect features of the models, and create more efficient and localized toolpaths.
    The cheaper 3d CAM packages that only use meshes usually only do a raster type of toolpath, basically moving back and forth across the surface of the part, stepping over a small amount for each pass.

    V Carving would be considered a 3D toolpath, but is a feature sometimes included in 2D cam programs (V-Carve Pro).
    Gerry
    ______________________________________________
    UCCNC 2017 Screenset

    Mach3 2010 Screenset

    JointCAM - CAM for Woodworking Joints

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  5. #34
    what a brilliant post and kind of sums everything up nicely.. thank you

  6. #35
    Quote Originally Posted by martin54 View Post
    I had downloaded both lazycam & cambam to have a look at & although I hadn't actually spent a lot of time looking at them neither of them seemed to be particularly easy to learn.
    To be fair Lazycam is virtually abandonware bundled with Mach3 but no longer officially supported or developed.

    Cambam ,personally not finding hard to pick up at all, it does allow you to cut parts before spending money with 40 trial uses.

  7. #36
    I don't see the point of getting Cut2D when the completely free version of Cambam does the vast majority of things that Cut2D does.
    Old router build log here. New router build log here. Lathe build log here.
    Electric motorbike project here.

  8. #37
    I am sure there will be lots of people who agree with you Jonathan but personally because I don't want to spend lots of time trying to learn new software & from what I could see cut 2D had some very good support & easy to follow tutorials it fitted the bill for me.
    Maybe if I were a bit younger then I would have opted for something else like cambam but unfortunately I don't have anywhere near as many grey cells as I use to have so although I am still happy to try & learn new things it's not as easy as it once was.

  9. #38
    Quote Originally Posted by martin54 View Post
    I am sure there will be lots of people who agree with you Jonathan but personally because I don't want to spend lots of time trying to learn new software & from what I could see cut 2D had some very good support & easy to follow tutorials it fitted the bill for me.
    Maybe if I were a bit younger then I would have opted for something else like cambam but unfortunately I don't have anywhere near as many grey cells as I use to have so although I am still happy to try & learn new things it's not as easy as it once was.
    I couldnt have put it better myself, I too have less and less time nowadays and learning new stuff is still magic but nowadays i learn what i need, and this in turn gives me the time to do the things i must.

    Rick..
    Always bear in mind that your own resolution to succeed is more important than any other - Abe Lincoln

  10. #39
    Cambam functions like some dawing programs and once get used to where things are in menus find it`s been reasonably intuitive.

    Cut2D shows its roots in software for the sign market and it has nicer 3d visualisations ;-)

    2d design likely to have been done outside of CAM program and its ease of depth setting , nesting and tabbing ,guess, are bits going to use most.

  11. #40
    Quote Originally Posted by Musht View Post
    2d design likely to have been done outside of CAM program and its ease of depth setting , nesting and tabbing ,guess, are bits going to use most.
    Hmmmm i guess its too late for me really but i never tried 2d design...

    Rick
    Always bear in mind that your own resolution to succeed is more important than any other - Abe Lincoln

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