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  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Saracen View Post
    I doubt I have the room for a 3HP compressor, and at 180kg (!) it would have to be pretty much static wherever it landed
    Sup with ya, its got wheels! Stick a couple of steppers on there and you've got a remote control bomb lol

  2. #12
    I'm guessing I have just been lucky with mine then, had my 50ltr machine for 8 or 9 years now & it's still going Strong. OK it's not run on a daily basis in fact some weeks it doesn't run at all but it has done a lot of work over the years although I haven't used it to spray anything since I got the HVLP machine 6 months ago.
    I got it because I needed something portable that I could throw in the car/van & this one fitted the bill but if I was buying a dedicated machine for the workshop I would buy something with a bigger tank.

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Shinobiwan View Post
    Sup with ya, its got wheels! Stick a couple of steppers on there and you've got a remote control bomb lol


    Looks like I'll need to be more drastic with the workshop clearance then

    Adrian

  4. #14
    There are some cheap hydrovane compressors out there.
    This one sold for 155.

    Hydrovane 6PU air compressor | eBay

    Best to get the tank mounted ones but many can be had single phase for under 450.

    My shop is about 50 foot away from the house but it against my neighbours house so I can't run anything really noisy late at night. I often forget to switch the compressor off and due to small leaks it often starts up a couple of times during the night.
    Never had any complaints from next door.

    There are differences in the models, the tank mounted ones are like normal compressors and use a pressure switch to cut off at a pre determined pressure.
    The tripod mounted ones have an unloader valve built into the compressor that stops it pumping, the motor carries on running. These can be uses as a normal compressor when fitted to a tanked system if the pressure switch is set to say 10 pounds below the unloader pressure.

    One way to save a lot of money is work out what the max pressure needs to be. Mine is set to run to 120 psi but I only use it for general use, no power tools etc so I have dropped the pressure to 95 pounds because it takes 5 minutes to get to 95 but 8 minutes to get to 120, that extra 25 pounds cost a lot of money as it has to do more work. It's also less strain on the compressor.
    John S -

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by John S View Post
    One way to save a lot of money is work out what the max pressure needs to be. Mine is set to run to 120 psi but I only use it for general use, no power tools etc so I have dropped the pressure to 95 pounds because it takes 5 minutes to get to 95 but 8 minutes to get to 120, that extra 25 pounds cost a lot of money as it has to do more work. It's also less strain on the compressor.
    Great advice John. I forgot to mention but after killing 2 compressors in the space of a year I hunted around on the spraying forums for advice and found this is fairly common practice on smaller hobby to light trade models. I adjust the pressure switch on my last one in a similar way and that's been good for all these years, might have something to do with that.

  6. #16
    I went through all the same pains when i first got my workshop, in the end i purchased a higher CFM unit, it is only a 50ltr but with 13cfm it fills the tank in no time instead of being on all the time, this is not a particularly noisy unit but ist not a whisper system either but the high CFM means its not on constantly either. Ive had it for two years now and its had two oil changes and its fine, i run a blaster cabinet and that will push any compressor to its limit, but its fine. Ive seen V configuration systems but they are running in the 80-90db region, thats way too noisey, mine runs at about 40db so whils not quiet its half as noisey as those. mine is a Wolf, from china i suspect but its not let me down yet!!

    Rick
    Always bear in mind that your own resolution to succeed is more important than any other - Abe Lincoln

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by Ricardoco View Post
    Ive seen V configuration systems but they are running in the 80-90db region, thats way too noisey, mine runs at about 40db so whils not quiet its half as noisey as those. mine is a Wolf, from china i suspect but its not let me down yet!!
    Half the actual acoustic output is a 6dB drop but due to the none linear way our hearing works we perceive more like 10dB as half the level.

  8. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by Shinobiwan View Post
    Half the actual acoustic output is a 6dB drop
    Half is surely -3dB as log(3)=0.48.

    Either way, no distances specified for these measurements so they don't really mean much without making assumptions. Plus the frequency response of the human ear isn't flat, so if one operates at a higher speed that would make a difference...
    Old router build log here. New router build log here. Lathe build log here.
    Electric motorbike project here.

  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by Jonathan View Post
    Half is surely -3dB as log(3)=0.48.

    Either way, no distances specified for these measurements so they don't really mean much without making assumptions. Plus the frequency response of the human ear isn't flat, so if one operates at a higher speed that would make a difference...
    From my point i was talking dbm, as i thought everyone was but still it is right to clarify this, the difference with my workshop is i can hear 80dbm outside quite clearly, i can also hear 40dbm outside, but hardly.

    Rick
    Always bear in mind that your own resolution to succeed is more important than any other - Abe Lincoln

  10. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by Jonathan View Post
    Half is surely -3dB as log(3)=0.48.
    No its 6dB for half the sound pressure output. Consider it the otherway around and you get the idea ie. 3dB increase is only half rather than double.

    Plus the frequency response of the human ear isn't flat, so if one operates at a higher speed that would make a difference...
    Not only that but also with a higher mean sound pressure level there is some compression of this. The fletcher munson curve is the commonly accepted equal loudness curve used to describe the frequency response of the ear when considered as a transducer.

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