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  1. #11
    Yes, I guess I am lucky as you say. Downside is that insulating it is going to take longer, cost more...etc. but it should be worth it.
    I'm dead envious of your wood burners. Wondering how I can swing a similar stunt myself now... I'll think on that for later.

    One garage door is now completely insulated. Looking like a silver space-ship hull from the inside now.

    A shed-load of rigid insulation board arrived today on the back of a lorry... destined for the garage roof. Weekend activities blanked out as a result.

    I put some spare lino on some batten planks so that lino overlaps about 2", and mounted them above the garage up-and-over doors. The flap of lino brushes the top of the door, and forms a neat draught excluder. Works a treat. Thanks for the suggestion Mocha.

  2. #12
    no probs, works well doesn't it? Did you do all around the door or just the top?

    If anyone else tries this and the lino / floor covering has an embossed pattern on it. Orientate it so the non embossed smooth side (the back) comes into contact with the surrounding wood / concrete.

  3. #13
    Only put lino draught excluders on the top of each door so far. Not sure how I'd fix it to the bottom of the door. Thinking of using a more solid rubber draught-excluder for the floor instead, but want to sort out insulating or getting matting on the floor before then so I know how much of a gap there will be.
    The doors themselves have metal strips on each side which cover the gap (see pic), into which I plan to put a regular window draught excluder/thin rubber strip.

    I've nearly finished insulated the roof. Cutting Celotex with a kitchen knife creates far less "dust" than using a saw. Still takes an age though.
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Looking at doing the walls next. Planning on a mix of battens/50mm insulation/board for where I won't need to hang shelves, and studs/50mm insulation-infill/insulation-over/boards where more strength is required. Then I should be ready to start something more interesting.

  4. #14
    id be chewing my left leg off for a workshop that size.

  5. #15
    i bet you can already tell the difference

  6. #16
    Roof complete. Walls starting to turn silver now.
    Any advice on wall-board to use ? Probably plywood, as it's easy to screw things into.

    Even now, it's getting quicker to heat, retains heat for longer, and top temperature is higher. Still got a way to go before it's complete however...

    Click image for larger version. 

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  7. #17
    Looking realy good now. You have done well to work around all that stuff. It looks like we may have both attended the same course on garage tidiness. G.

  8. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by GEOFFREY View Post
    Looking realy good now. You have done well to work around all that stuff. It looks like we may have both attended the same course on garage tidiness. G.
    What stuff? all i see is a load of artwork ready to hang on those nice new walls
    If the nagging gets really bad......Get a bigger shed:naughty:

  9. #19
    Hello techcobweb: We all have "soo much to learn!" However, you have a lot going for you. It takes a lot of effort to build a cnc machine from scratch but it all starts with a plan. Make it a simple plan. I started with a design of the basic components in Microsoft Powerpoint and dedicated individual slides for the components (now I have BobCad-Cam). Since you'll be working with wood, a consideration for the machine material could be aluminum. I have an old drill press, a 10" mitter saw with a metal cutting disk and a small vise attached to it to hold the plates, drills and taps. There are low temperature aluminum welding rods you could use to weld the parts together using a propane torch (I haven't tried them). But, along the way, you'll find a machine shop that might allow you to use/rent a milling machine for some of the more precise parts (that's what happened to me). That's another thing to learn! In regards to the cold weather, I can only offer to send you a bottle of our hot Southern Florida sun! Good luck

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