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  1. Quote Originally Posted by JAZZCNC View Post
    I'm ok with it. . . . All I'll suggest is that you keep the information has simple has possibly and keep technical jargon and complicated formulas to a minimum. They are not really needed in this case anyway.!!

    Remember the target audience is new comers and they don't want rocket science maths just plane simple information, more than this and it complicates things and puts them off which really shouldn't need be the case for building such a simple thing.!
    I agree Dean, and the drawings Jonathan did are useful too.

  2. #32
    You both have valid points and all the info is out there including the thread I linked to. BUT none of this in the right form for a newbie to electronics at this level. What we need is a properly structured tutorial to help answer the question 'how do I build a linear PSU for x volts' with a 'best practice' design, a schematic and assembly guidelines along with photos of good - and, maybe, bad - examples.

    That would be greatly appreciated, i for one am Electrically Challenged and couldn't even contemplate a build without some assistance from you guys.

  3. #33
    Quote Originally Posted by JAZZCNC View Post
    No problem mate I've helped proper thick twats in the past and they got it in the end. . .Lol
    I know the feeling!

  4. #34
    Hi all,

    All this week I was looking for information related to DIY PSU,
    and found this assembled power board : PMDX.COM - Products for CNC and motion control applications
    AC input 18-35 volts
    DC output 24-50 volts and up to 10 amps

    It seems that this is what I need for my Gecko drivers,
    but one thing I can't understand, see pics from manual.
    If I good understand, so I have to choose 30V/AC transformer if I want to stay on safe side, but at the same time lose some power?, or I'm ok with 35V/AC ?

    Thanks
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

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  5. #35
    Gytis,

    If your unsure then has a guide just check the voltage coming into building, if it's on the high side then go for the lower transformer to be on safe side.

    There actually 33Vac transformers which will suit better see below. 2x33 will give approx 45-46Vdc and 500Va will give approx 7.5A or 625Va 9A
    Chassis mounting toroidal transformers
    Last edited by JAZZCNC; 01-09-2013 at 10:17 PM.

  6. The Following User Says Thank You to JAZZCNC For This Useful Post:


  7. #36
    Quote Originally Posted by JAZZCNC View Post
    Gytis,

    If your unsure then has a guide just check the voltage coming into building, if it's on the high side then go for the lower transformer to be on safe side.

    There actually 33Vac transformers which will suit better see below. 2x33 will give approx 45-46Vdc and 500Va will give approx 7.5A or 625Va 9A
    Chassis mounting toroidal transformers
    Thank you Dean!

  8. #37
    Quote Originally Posted by JAZZCNC View Post
    Gytis,

    If your unsure then has a guide just check the voltage coming into building, if it's on the high side then go for the lower transformer to be on safe side.
    Measuring it at a random time is pretty meaningless - at any one point on the grid the mains voltage can and does vary by several volts over time. I'd advise getting a transformer based on the standard mains voltage tolerance (i.e. 230+10%=253V in the UK), otherwise the power supply can't be described as stable and safe for the drivers.

    So with a 230V to 33V transformer, using the 10% tolerance and 1.1V drop for rectifier, you can expect up to 33*1.1*1.414-1.1=50.2V. Granted that's not likely to occur at all often, but it is over the rated voltage of the drivers so using the 30V transformer is would be less of a risk. If using a 35V transformer (i.e. the spare one I had) then I'd add in some extra diodes or a linear regulator circuit to keep the voltage within the specification.
    Old router build log here. New router build log here. Lathe build log here.
    Electric motorbike project here.

  9. The Following User Says Thank You to Jonathan For This Useful Post:


  10. #38
    Quote Originally Posted by Jonathan View Post
    Measuring it at a random time is pretty meaningless - at any one point on the grid the mains voltage can and does vary by several volts over time. I'd advise getting a transformer based on the standard mains voltage tolerance (i.e. 230+10%=253V in the UK), otherwise the power supply can't be described as stable and safe for the drivers.
    Yes I agree Erring on safe side is best but it will give him a clue to what the supply is doing which he doesn't have NOW. Esp if he checks over a time period.!

    I think the 33vac will be fine because the G540 Gecko can handle more than 50Vdc for short bursts and it's very unlikely you'll ever get near that voltage.
    Last edited by JAZZCNC; 01-09-2013 at 11:06 PM.

  11. #39
    one minute ago I checked the voltage in the house, it was 236-238V

  12. #40
    Fun fact - if you have solar panels on the roof the mains voltage in your house will rise a little on a sunny day. I've noticed this effect after putting 1.14kWp of panels on the shed adjacent to my workshop...
    Last edited by Jonathan; 01-09-2013 at 11:32 PM.
    Old router build log here. New router build log here. Lathe build log here.
    Electric motorbike project here.

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