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  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Jonathan View Post
    What R&D! If they'd done any R&D then it wouldn't be made from plywood.
    Agree with Jonathan but also under stand what your saying.!! . . . But don't think you realise just what can be achieved with 400.

    I could build a base frame and Gantry for machine with 1000 x 700 cutting made from Box section steel for 60 and still have some steel left.!!

    If you want bling and shiny then 500 would buy all the Aluminium plate and profile for this machine Click image for larger version. 

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ID:	10250 which purely by coincidence is very similar in design to Excel's machine here EXEL CNC SL6090 Pro that cost's 6000 and it's not has stiff or neat has my design(Which was designed and built well before they started).

    With 2K you can build a cracking steel machine complete with profiled linear rails and all the trimmings.
    To give an idea I'm just Finishing off a machine for someone like the one in the Picture which has profiled rails, ballscrews, 3Nm motor's along Proximity switch limits and energy chain all the trimmings etc.

    Proper Control box (which I'm doing Now between typing here.!!) Click image for larger version. 

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ID:	10251 that has high quality 80V AM882 Digital drives, excellent CSMIO-P-M motion control card full with 24v signals and Estop system driven thru Pilz safety relay etc

    All this for 2800 minus spindle.!! (and I'm covering most my time). . . . . Built from steel it would be Less.!!
    Last edited by JAZZCNC; 27-09-2013 at 04:40 PM.

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  3. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by m_c View Post
    Yes, 400 could buy you all the metal you need to potentially create a better machine, but then you've got to learn how to work with metal and probably spend more on tools to be able to work with it or pay for somebody else to do it, whereas that 400 gets you a basic machine that needs a lot less input to get a working machine.
    Sorry absolutely don't agree that thing will be harder to setup than pair of SU carbs that's been sat in scrapyard for 20 yrs (Know you'll relate to that Moray.) and it will quiver like a jelly if pushed hard.!! . . . . No contest.!

    For less than 100 steel and 75 welder could have far superior machine. For 200 I'd cut and weld the bugger up no problem.!!

  4. Quote Originally Posted by JAZZCNC View Post
    Sorry absolutely don't agree that thing will be harder to setup than pair of SU carbs that's been sat in scrapyard for 20 yrs (Know you'll relate to that Moray.) and it will quiver like a jelly if pushed hard.!! . . . . No contest.!

    For less than 100 steel and 75 welder could have far superior machine. For 200 I'd cut and weld the bugger up no problem.!!
    I've never dealt with carbs on cars of any kind ;)

  5. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Jonathan View Post
    From the images you've posted it's clear that your machine has quite a lot of backlash, so you definitely want to eliminate this by using ballscrews on your next machine.



    What R&D! If they'd done any R&D then it wouldn't be made from plywood. If you consider it worth paying for R&D, then just look at the build logs on this forum and you'll find all the information you need. I've recently posted about a machine I made, and I will upload the drawings/plans to the post very soon. No I'm not charging for it as it's all information you can get for nothing if you're prepared to spend a little time reading the forums. Charging for it would be like charging people to read this website...
    Jonathan, yes, my current machine does have a lot of backlash. Unfortunately there is quite a lot of play in the whole machine so I haven't even bothered trying to dial any of it out with software.

    Maybe R&D was a bad term to use. The guy that sells the kits (which are cut using the machine he sells kits of btw) has revised the design and build instructions several times. He has a dedicated forum for people building the machine and has refined the design from his customers input to make it better and more fool-proof to build. 'Support' would have been a better reason for justifying the price. With several build logs to refer to from other people building identical machines (Startseite - CNC-Holzfraese), I felt that it would be worth the cost of the kit. It's the path I followed for my existing machine and it's the support and building tips/mods from the Phlatprinter community that made the build so much more enjoyable.

    Quote Originally Posted by JAZZCNC View Post
    Sorry absolutely don't agree that thing will be harder to setup than pair of SU carbs that's been sat in scrapyard for 20 yrs
    Jazz, My main concern was building the machine 'square'. I know how difficult it can be to build an RC aeroplane without warps etc. I'd much rather have an accurately machined metal frame that could be bolted together rather than glued and screwed!

    Anyway, thanks to all the input from you guys i'm pleased to say the Plyw**d machine is looking much less likely.

    Si.

  6. #15
    Hi Guys, i'm back again with another newbie question...

    I've spent most of the weekend reading the threads on this forum. I think my brain is overloaded with info now! At least I know a lot more today than I did on Friday when I first posted.

    Anyway, my question.

    My current machine is located at the bottom of the garden in a 8'x10' wooden shed. The shed is built on a slabbed base and has a wooden floor. I have a 10' worksurface down one length of the shed, the current machine is bolted to this.

    With a more conventional steel or ali machine, I intend to remove the worksurface to make room for it. Depending on whether the machine is suitable for bench mounting or has it's own frame, is it sufficient mount it directly onto the wooden floor that is currently there (supported underneath), or would I be better off putting holes in the floor so that it stands on the slabs underneath the shed and is isolated?

    Cheers,
    Si.

  7. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by firetrappe View Post
    With a more conventional steel or ali machine, I intend to remove the worksurface to make room for it. Depending on whether the machine is suitable for bench mounting or has it's own frame, is it sufficient mount it directly onto the wooden floor that is currently there (supported underneath), or would I be better off putting holes in the floor so that it stands on the slabs underneath the shed and is isolated?
    Well depends really on machine size and weight. Most decent sized steel machines are quite heavy so it's a good idea to mount to something sturdy.
    The bigger problem with mounting on Shed floor comes from inertia shacking machine and the shed so needs bolting down to floor directly.
    Same goes with a Bench mounted machine, the Bench needs to be substantial and fastened to shed walls along with machine bolted to it.

    It's good fun watching a machine on full tilt walk around workshop. .

  8. #17
    I thought i'd just give a quick update since my first post on here...

    Thanks to a couple of the forum members, namely Kingcreaky and JazzCNC, I think i've learnt more in the past week about CNC than I had in the last 4 years. Both these guys contacted me offering advice, help and guidance without trying to sell me anything or push me in any particular direction.
    I've been members of several different forums over the years and this isn't really the norm. Usually I receive PM's asking for help or trying to sell the latest and greatest product. It's a breath of fresh air to have genuine people pro-actively contacting me just trying to help.

    I just wanted to publicly thank these guys and say what a nice forum i'm finding this to be. Hopefully when i've got a bit more experience i'll be able to offer similar help to others like these guys regularly seem to do.

    For any newbies and lurkers out there like me, don't be afraid to ask questions here. It could save you a hell of a lot of time and money from making bad decisions!

    Si.
    Last edited by firetrappe; 03-10-2013 at 11:54 AM.

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