Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
  1. #1
    Hi Guys,

    Been a long while saving to get the money together to buy a 6040 from ebay. I know, I know lol that despite some bloody good advice from you guys I went for it and have built a worktop for it on my garage. It's now up and running! Got it up and operating using mach 3 and from some test g codes logos etc. I have ran the stepper motors and they appear to work well. Spindle and VFD look good also.

    Now here is where the learning curve really gets steep. Now that I have set the machine up and got it ready I'm looking to learn the basics of operating the machine and cutting effectively.

    I do have an engineering background electrics/electronics mainly but I have worked with steel on mills and lathes when I was an apprentice 25 yrs ago. (Not the same as CNC I appreciate.) I'm looking at cutting wood/ MDF to make picture frames etc for gifts.

    I really need pointers and advice guys on how to start and iron out all my silly questions etc. Simple things like orientation of workpiece. Simple and best practice for setting 0,0. Looking at adding limit switches and anything else to make it easier to work with.

    Guess that it's not the designing the work, it's the physical aspects of zeroing and setting the job up cutting speeds and advice etc.

    Sorry if this sounds a bit lame. The reason why I went for the chinese cnc was so that I can get on with learning how to use mach3 and actually making items rather than the CNC.

    Will start with work orientation the axis x and y seem the wrong way round when looking at the machine bed in a landscape orientation. I know this is the way the machine is set up. But is this normal? Is it worth trying to swap the the x and y axis?
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	cnc6040.jpg 
Views:	940 
Size:	116.4 KB 
ID:	10778

    Sorry if this sounds so stupid. But I guess I won't learn if I'm too worried asking dumb questions!

    Thank you guys.

  2. #2
    Hi,
    congratulations!

    I was there some years ago, so lets see how we can make your learning faster.

    Here are some tips for you , i will try to order them like steps:

    1. Mach3
    -Buy it if you haven't done it already. Dont use cracked version. You will need help and will have a lot of questions, use their forum also. It quite worth the money.
    -read profoundly the Mach3 manual again and again. there are the answers to most of your questions. You don't need limit switches, you could use software limits, but you should have known it if you read the manual

    2. Buy some good and cheap router bits. Not Chinese, they are crap. Look at ebay for a seller called Drillman1. he sells Kyocera microtools carbide router bits , buy some 2 flute and single flute 1/8 and 1/4 which not only are the best price around but most of them are best quality

    3. Read forums and find your speeds for different materials with the router bits and your machine
    I have similar machine, its not strong but does the job. As a starters do same depth of cut as your bit diameter and you will be OK, you could do maybe even aluminum, but you have to scratch it.

    Here are some speeds and feeds which can serve you as starting points.I lost with these a couple of weeks and a lot of broken bits. For this type of machine they are OK, even if many may disagree:

    everything in imperial,1/8 or 1/4 it doesn't matter as usually the machine is the limiting factor here , not the bit , though more careful with longer or thinner bits :

    soft plastic , its scratching but if you go deeper with flimsy machine, it melts, better use single flute if speed is needed.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	soft plastic.JPG 
Views:	839 
Size:	83.0 KB 
ID:	10779

    plexiglass
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	plexiglass.JPG 
Views:	667 
Size:	80.3 KB 
ID:	10780

    MDF,wood, works for phenolic plastic also, composite panel
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	MDF wood.JPG 
Views:	820 
Size:	85.2 KB 
ID:	10783

    Harder wood
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	harder wood.JPG 
Views:	512 
Size:	85.0 KB 
ID:	10785

    Aluminum, i told you its scratching. You could change the depth of cut. 8000rpm is pretty the perfect speed for this material

    with 2 flute
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	aluminum 2 flute.JPG 
Views:	553 
Size:	70.9 KB 
ID:	10790

    with 1 flute, which is better in my opinion
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	aluminum1 flute.JPG 
Views:	440 
Size:	50.8 KB 
ID:	10792


    Surfacing with a big 2 flute cutter
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	surfacing.JPG 
Views:	448 
Size:	57.4 KB 
ID:	10796



    This should keep you busy for a couple of weeks !
    Last edited by Boyan Silyavski; 17-11-2013 at 05:44 PM.

  3. The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to Boyan Silyavski For This Useful Post:


  4. #3
    Im new to this too and have 1500 to spend on the complete setup i too am looking at the ebay versions because i want to be able to plug and play I'm looking at making small embellishments for crafts and the odd plaque like you see on horse stables will this kind of machine do this? also how much is mach 3 ?

    Chris

  5. #4
    Hi Silyavski,

    Wow, I'm really blown away with the quality and info that you have put into this post. Got to thank you so much for all of the info here. It's a little daunting as you say the learning curve is steep. But you have managed to help make things a lot more simple

    I appreciate all the handy screen captures for the different tools and materials. I have indeed got the basic engraving cutters that came with the router. But I really need to get the extra cutters to make the right cuts.

    I am going to make a picture display case as my first project. My wife loves Depeche Mode and we recently went to see them at concert so she would like a smart display case to showcase photos and tickets etc.

    Gotta really get my head around the mach3 software as that in itself is a work in progress with learning exactly how to use it I have managed to jog around and run some g code. Not actually cutting anything yet. Need to get comfortable with positioning material and zeroing the workpiece.

    My machine is in my garage and I reckon I'm going to have to make myself some simple 'idiot guides' lol. It's amazing what I forget between reading and then going over to my garage.

    I will let you know how I get on though and post up some pics as soon as I start making some cuts!! (definitely going to be needing the spoil board under my work ;-)

    Thanks again so much for all your help.

    Andy

  6. #5
    No problem, glad that i can help here.

    Here are some more tips:

    1. Using the formula
    Formula to determine feed rate[edit]
    This formula[10] can be used to figure out the feed rate that the cutter travels into or around the work. This would apply to cutters on a milling machine, drill press and a number of other machine tools. This is not to be used on the lathe for turning operations, as the feed rate on a lathe is given as feed per revolution.
    FR = {RPM x T x CL}
    Where:
    FR = the calculated feed rate in inches per minute or mm per minute.
    RPM = is the calculated speed for the cutter.
    T = Number of teeth on the cutter.
    CL = The chip load or feed per tooth. This is the size of chip that each tooth of the cutter takes
    you could variate things if need job done faster up to where drivers, machine, rigidity holds, see 2 examples below:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	example 1.JPG 
Views:	444 
Size:	44.7 KB 
ID:	10804
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	example 2.JPG 
Views:	413 
Size:	55.1 KB 
ID:	10805

    Means as soon as the CL chip load stays the same its Ok.

    However its worth noting that is not a good idea pushing the spindle more than 18000RPM if you want to last. The bearings i mean.

    I prefer going deeper than faster, when i want to push.

    Its worth noting that some materials have "perfect spindle speed". Like aluminum for example -around 8000rpm. Anyways, the above examples from the previous post are all with the relevant "perfect" speed for the material.

    2. These numbers also work for engraving /v bits/. However for bits with included angle 45 and 30 degree is better the feedrate to be 25% slower, cause will easily brake tips. Same is for thinner than 1/8 bits or long bits.

    3. Bigger shanks are better,less chatter, but more expensive. Use them for precise jobs. Or paid ones. Sometimes i prefer using 10x 1/8 bits 1/8 shank, than 2x 1/8 bits with 1/4 shank, as they cost exactly the same, but 10 bits last longer than 2. Especially on not so sturdy machine. Its a compromise of a kind. Same with the V cutters.

    4
    V cutters.
    60 and 90 degree do all jobs. Dont bother with 30 and 45 degrees as usually they will brake tips and wood chips at that angle.They are only for special purposes. For small stuff i use the 1/8 as they are cheap, for bigger things i use the 1/4 and bigger. . Buy from Drillman1 the spiral ones, as you can use them for engraving and cutting the work piece at the same time. With a bit of sanding later.

    5. when you are more confident after cutting some MDF for example, you should check the machine precision and adjust it if needed. Get some pieces of MDF for the test , digital caliper and read the Mach3 manual.
    I have my machine in imperial, so bear with me. The principle is the same. When ready, program a 3 inch line /X axis/ . Cut it using a brand 1/8 bit / not chinese- again/ , deep as the diameter. Rapidly measure with the digital caliper. Rapidly, because after a minute or 2 the MDF expands so the measurement will not be correct. Keep the caliper 90 degrees. Now if the line is correct distance, repeat with Y axis. If not, go to the mach 3 screen for the motor step adjustment and make the router move in X 3 inches. When it asks what is the actual distance you measured, fill what you measured. Then repeat until eliminating human error and everything is correct on X and Y. Cut a circle and a square, if they look nice and measure correctly, here you have it. Meanwhile check the suggested steps in the motor tuning dialogue. And hit the save button. And keep a backup of your xml file.

    6 About the zeroing
    Forget for a moment the touch probes, custom screens,zeroing scripts and so you have seen on the forums.

    My everyday zeroing on wood is the following:
    -first in Aspire/my CAM/, i almost always use the 0 to be on the top center of the material, not its edge. So its easier to mark using 2 diagonals the center on a square or rectangular piece of wood. Even on circular. Then check with ruler if needed.
    -hit the TAB button on mach 3. Set feed-rate to 3. Hit F5 and start the spindle/ if its connected via your breakout board/. Or just start it. So with this slow feedrate using the arrows buttons on the keyboard, move the thing and touch the center. Hit the XYZ buttons to 0. Lift the spindle. Stop it. Now you have zeroed. Simple, isn't it.

    Zeroing scripts and touch probe ring/made from copper tube/ i use only for aluminum.
    Last edited by Boyan Silyavski; 17-11-2013 at 10:30 PM.

  7. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Boyan Silyavski For This Useful Post:


  8. #6
    If you want to spend some money how about this

    GWizard: A CNC Machinist's Calculator for Feeds and Speeds

  9. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to EddyCurrent For This Useful Post:


  10. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by silyavski View Post
    My everyday zeroing on wood is the following:

    -hit the TAB button on mach 3. Set feed-rate to 3. Hit F5 and start the spindle/ if its connected via your breakout board/. Or just start it. So with this slow feedrate using the arrows buttons on the keyboard, move the thing and touch the center. Hit the XYZ buttons to 0. Lift the spindle. Stop it. Now you have zeroed. Simple, isn't it.
    BAD PRACTICE to start the spindle don't do this.!! . . . . Just Jog down close and when close switch Jog Mode to Step, set the steps to some small number and creep up on the surface. This way you haven't got to mess around setting Low feeds etc.

    Better still just Make a touch Probe it takes 30mins max and saves loads of time when setting parts. It's something you'll never want to be without ounce used.!!

  11. #8
    hey silyavski and eddycurrent. That is an absolute load of helpful information. I'm really overwhelmed with the amount of effort that you have put into helping me.

    clearly you are a real asset to this forum and I too hope to give a little back once I have gotten a hang of all this.

    So much to go on and I'm now going to order some more cutters from the eBay link you suggested. Glad you mentioned using the smaller guage cutters. Especially as I reckon I may break a good few with practice!

    Going to have a good read up on mach3 now. But seriously I do really appreciate all the help you have given.

    Cheers. andy

  12. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by JAZZCNC View Post
    BAD PRACTICE to start the spindle don't do this.!! . . . . Just Jog down close and when close switch Jog Mode to Step, set the steps to some small number and creep up on the surface. This way you haven't got to mess around setting Low feeds etc.

    Better still just Make a touch Probe it takes 30mins max and saves loads of time when setting parts. It's something you'll never want to be without ounce used.!!
    Most of the time I work with wood which is not even planed, rough cut wood /cheaper/, so probe will not work, in fact it does not work, as my probe is hanging helplessly in the dirt without me needing it. I use it only with plastic and aluminum.
    Most of the time i am eyeing the 0, so if the spindle is not spinning mistakes in the range of 1mm are done.

    Furthermore my copper ring probe in the summer is 0.325 inch high and in the winter is 0.323. And the steel touchplate cut from supported square rail f---ks the tip of my sharpest V cutters

    I trust more my feeling, ears and my eyes than on a probe, as in general i work with less than perfect materials, where every time a different decision has to be made.
    But hey, that's me. I don't encourage any body here, just sharing.

  13. #10
    Hello All! I hope you don't mine me jumping into the conversation, but i just received a 6040z for Christmas and am searching for as much information as possible about how to start it up and get it running correctly. I was searching the web for information and stumbled upon this site. Great information being shared here. It is greatly appreciated.

    A little info on where I am so far. I have the machine all put together with Mach3 loaded on a clean version of Win XP Pro in a Dell tower. I also installed a trial version of VCarve today. Have rust inhibitor in the water container and have replaced the extremely loud water pump with a quiet 250 gpm one.

    I am so much of a beginner. The only thing i am sure of is that I do not know enough to know what is important to ask. lol

    Cheers

    Sabre

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Chinese 6040 CNC Router Advise Needed
    By Bob Hepple in forum Chinese Machines
    Replies: 24
    Last Post: 27-11-2013, 12:00 PM
  2. What is your opinion of the CNC 6040 Router Machine ?
    By John S in forum Chinese Machines
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 12-09-2013, 11:35 AM
  3. suggested equipment to retro fit a 6040 yoocnc
    By madprof1 in forum Milling Machines, Builds & Conversions
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 03-12-2012, 09:52 PM
  4. 6040 router
    By John S in forum Milling Machines, Builds & Conversions
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 01-10-2012, 07:18 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •