Thread: new member

  1. #1
    bmbaz's Avatar
    Lives in bolton, United Kingdom. Last Activity: 7 Hours Ago Has been a member for 3-4 years. Has a total post count of 15. Received thanks 1 times, giving thanks to others 1 times.
    hi all, names Baz, been conventional turning/milling for the last 15yrs, before that operated(very little editing) cnc machines for Bae company and my boss wants to step into the world of cnc and yours truely is the most qualified, so i thought i`d look up a good forum and ask alot of questions. along with alot of people i`m absolutly amazed at home made machines and would appreciate anyone in the northwest of the uk that can let me look at a "homebrew". here`s jumping in blindfolded

  2. #2
    Hi, welcome to the site. Some of the home brew machines made by members here are mind blowing, and I think that every single home built machine (yes, even the mdf/skate bearing type) that gets completed and "mastered" is real credit to its builder. Don,t worry about the blindfold, some of our more experienced members will soon help you see the light!! Good luck. G.

  3. #3
    Neale's Avatar
    Lives in Plymouth, United Kingdom. Last Activity: 4 Hours Ago Has been a member for 4-5 years. Has a total post count of 1,005. Received thanks 170 times, giving thanks to others 5 times.
    That's the politest thing about the MDF/skate bearing router that I have ever seen on this forum - and I've built and currently use one! It's funny that there's hardly anyone that would consider building, say, a milling machine or lathe that could come close to the cost/performance of a commercial item, but CNC routers are an exception to this, at least in the kinds of sizes that suit a home workshop. Always interesting to hear from a "professional" as there's always lots to learn.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Neale View Post
    It's funny that there's hardly anyone that would consider building, say, a milling machine or lathe that could come close to the cost/performance of a commercial item, but CNC routers are an exception to this
    I think that might be because there are plenty of second hand manual milling machines and lathes available, so converting an existing one to CNC is likely to be cheaper than making the whole thing - especially if you don't have a milling machine or lathe to start with.

    bmbaz: You're welcome to see my homemade CNC router/mill/lathe... but it looks like you're over 100 miles away so I expect you'll find someone closer.
    Old router build log here. New router build log here. Lathe build log here.
    Electric motorbike project here.

  5. #5
    bmbaz's Avatar
    Lives in bolton, United Kingdom. Last Activity: 7 Hours Ago Has been a member for 3-4 years. Has a total post count of 15. Received thanks 1 times, giving thanks to others 1 times.
    many thanks guys, I inherited a 1952/3 ml7 a year ago that I`ve been cleaning up and using as its still in damn good shape and I found a post of a guy that converted one of these and I found the whole read amazing. looking forward to absorbing all thats out there

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by bmbaz View Post
    many thanks guys, I inherited a 1952/3 ml7 a year ago that I`ve been cleaning up and using as its still in damn good shape and I found a post of a guy that converted one of these and I found the whole read amazing. looking forward to absorbing all thats out there
    Hi I live near Stockport and you are welcome to pop over if you wish I have a ml super 7 converted to cnc and a Warco wm18 also converted but need to change the screws to ball screws I have also built a 1600 x 1000 router with a lot of help on here. Still learning every day though ..Clive
    Last edited by Clive S; 18-04-2014 at 11:27 PM.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •