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  1. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by Wobblybootie View Post
    Typical Forums ... lol ... Half say no need for Epoxy on a machine cutting wood ... the other half say it's absolutely necessary.
    This is for you to decide.
    Spelling mistakes are not intentional, I only seem to see them some time after I've posted

  2. #22
    you poured your epoxy in small sections ... how did you get them any more level than the posts they were poured on already were?
    Tim G-C

    I disapprove of what you say, but I will defend to the death your right to say it.

    (attrib. Voltaire but written by Evelyn Beatrice Hall "The Friends of Voltaire" 1906)

  3. #23
    Ok well in this case then you'll be ok to some degree because the roughing of the forms doesn't require any decent finish and the 3D tool paths will be small step overs so very little tool pressure. Just build the Z axis strong with a good design and you'll be ok.

    Regards the Bracing then it will still be possible to store sheets under with a few tweaks here and there so not a big deal.

  4. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by Wobblybootie View Post
    you poured your epoxy in small sections ... how did you get them any more level than the posts they were poured on already were?
    Sorry I don't understand this, I poured all at the same time in one big section i.e. two rail beams and two bridges.
    Spelling mistakes are not intentional, I only seem to see them some time after I've posted

  5. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by Wobblybootie View Post
    Typical Forums ... lol ... Half say no need for Epoxy on a machine cutting wood ... the other half say it's absolutely necessary.
    Ye because the half that say you do haven't built one before. . .Lol

    No doubt you'll read in various threads that I say build in has much adjustabilty as possible. There's a reason for this and I'm sure eddy and those that have built larger machines will agree being able to tweak any error out is a big help when setting up.
    Your design with top rail having no adjustabilty is restrictive and rely's completlely on you making sure both rails are on the same plane when welding up or using the Epoxy method and completly relying on it working. This is fine for someone like me with plenty of experience and some nice long accurate straight edges etc but if your tool limited with little experience then believe me you'll be grateful for that adjustabilty.!

  6. #26
    Eddy, I saw the little square pours and the 'joints' between the uprights and the rail beams and thought that was where you had laid the epoxy, then I read backwards ...

    Okay so epoxy will correct minor differences in the rails and the beams, where else can I build in adjustability I don't include basic adjustment in the feet (they were there to take up floor unevenness)

    I can get the rail carrying beams milled top and bottom to give me a sporting chance and have a the lip milled in for the datum edge of the rails.
    Last edited by Wobblybootie; 16-10-2014 at 10:33 PM.
    Tim G-C

    I disapprove of what you say, but I will defend to the death your right to say it.

    (attrib. Voltaire but written by Evelyn Beatrice Hall "The Friends of Voltaire" 1906)

  7. #27
    As Jazz said, try to design your top rails with adjustability built in instead of relying on epoxy to save the day. If you look at my frame design you will see 10mm plates at the top of each upright on the frame. These have 10mm bolts going through them to fix the top rail in place. If I need to adjust the levels of the top rails, with this design I can use shims under each plate to tweak the levels. I may still need to use epoxy but the chances of getting away with it are better with this design.


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  8. #28
    I assume you have fitted a plug into the uprights with a tapped hole then drill a hole in the top of your beam large enough to get a socket through followed by a smaller one through the lower part for the bolt. Close the holes when shimmed and pour epoxy onto the upper surface of the beam ...
    Tim G-C

    I disapprove of what you say, but I will defend to the death your right to say it.

    (attrib. Voltaire but written by Evelyn Beatrice Hall "The Friends of Voltaire" 1906)

  9. #29
    No, I bolt upwards through the plates into the bottom of threaded holes on the top rail.

  10. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by IanS1 View Post
    No, I bolt upwards through the plates into the bottom of threaded holes on the top rail.
    Like he said, and with your 5mm section it might be okay but if not, as in my case, I glued in a piece of 30x6 flat strap using Gorilla Glue to increase the wall thickness.
    Spelling mistakes are not intentional, I only seem to see them some time after I've posted

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