Thread: Kitchen doors

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  1. #11
    looks nice that pal! are these machines you are building for peeps?

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by cropwell View Post
    I restored my guitar a couple of years ago
    Must be a self build I don't recognise the shape.
    Spelling mistakes are not intentional, I only seem to see them some time after I've posted

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by EddyCurrent View Post
    Must be a self build I don't recognise the shape.
    It's a Westone Spectrum GT, about 30 years old. Japanese.

  4. #14
    Just as I was moving away from MDF, I find out you can powdercoat it! I am very interested in how resilient to knocks an edge roundover is. And how easy it is to spray cupboard sized areas.

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by jimbo_cnc View Post
    Just as I was moving away from MDF, I find out you can powdercoat it! I am very interested in how resilient to knocks an edge roundover is. And how easy it is to spray cupboard sized areas.
    Spraying cupboard size areas will be easy enough but cooking the buggers will need proper oven setup. Knock wise then to be honest I'm not sure on MDF but suppose it will match paint.? . . Will try next time I've got it out and bash it up a bit.!

  6. #16
    Ger21's Avatar
    Lives in Detroit, United States. Last Activity: 5 Hours Ago Has been a member for 4-5 years. Has a total post count of 368. Received thanks 51 times, giving thanks to others 0 times. Referred 1 members to the community.
    We actually buy some powder coated MDF components on a somewhat regular basis. I believe that it's far more difficult to do than powder coating metal. The MDF needs to be preheated before coating to prevent outgassing during baking. It also needs a low temp powder. And I've heard that climate control of the MDF is critical.

    The supplier we've been using does outstanding work, and it's really an amazing product. We haven't done any destructive testing, but it appears to be far more durable than any other finish you could put on MDF.
    While it's fairly inexpensive, we've found that you do get what you pay for. We got some samples from a (much) cheaper supplier, and their quality was not nearly as good.
    If you can find a shop that does it in your area, you might be surprised at how affordable it can be. I'd highly recommend it.
    Gerry
    ______________________________________________
    UCCNC 2017 Screenset

    Mach3 2010 Screenset

    JointCAM - CAM for Woodworking Joints

  7. #17
    If I were you, I would strip back using a quality sanding paper with a medium grit, and then buy some high quality waterproof paint

    Good luck with the project

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