Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
  1. #1
    cncJim's Avatar
    Lives in Reading, United Kingdom. Last Activity: 2 Weeks Ago Has been a member for 4-5 years. Has a total post count of 170. Received thanks 15 times, giving thanks to others 32 times.
    Hi All,

    I have a Warco BH600g lathe which sits on a couple of cabinets.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	4322039823_6a9d613ecb.jpg 
Views:	588 
Size:	52.4 KB 
ID:	13761

    I would like to put it on some adjustable machine feet so I can level it (My garage floor is not particularly level). Like these:-

    http://www.axminster.co.uk/axminster...machinery-feet

    My question is how many feet should I use? My first thought was just 4 But I am now thinking it may be better with more (4 on the larger cabinet and 2 on the smaller one?)

    I like the idea that it would be more stable using more feet but I guess the flip side would be more of a faff to level?

    Thanks,

    Jim

    EDIT:-
    Just read that leveling should be done by shimming where the lathe attaches to the cabinets to take any twist out of the bed..? In this case I guess the more feet the better?
    Last edited by cncJim; 28-10-2014 at 11:06 AM.

  2. #2
    What about a steel dolly underneath with a foot at each corner;

    like this only DIY version and not castors ; http://www.axminster.co.uk/heavy-duty-machine-base

    I generally find machines are too low for back comfort so raising them is a good thing for me, it woud also give some height allowing use of a recycled pallet duck board
    Last edited by EddyCurrent; 28-10-2014 at 11:11 AM.
    Spelling mistakes are not intentional, I only seem to see them some time after I've posted

  3. The Following User Says Thank You to EddyCurrent For This Useful Post:


  4. #3
    Neale's Avatar
    Lives in Plymouth, United Kingdom. Last Activity: 4 Hours Ago Has been a member for 4-5 years. Has a total post count of 1,000. Received thanks 170 times, giving thanks to others 5 times.
    I've used those feet on my bandsaw and milling machine and they work well for levelling. Lathes can be a bit fussier, though. How stiff is the cabinet - would it be happier supported at 6 points rather than 4? Will the cabinet itself distort? How many mounting points did the manufacturer provide? I would be inclined to go for 4 as that makes the levelling and calibration easier. Not that I can talk - my lathe sits on thin MDF and ply packing...

  5. #4
    cncJim's Avatar
    Lives in Reading, United Kingdom. Last Activity: 2 Weeks Ago Has been a member for 4-5 years. Has a total post count of 170. Received thanks 15 times, giving thanks to others 32 times.
    Thanks for the replies! :)

    Quote Originally Posted by EddyCurrent View Post
    What about a steel dolly underneath with a foot at each corner;

    like this only DIY version and not castors ; http://www.axminster.co.uk/heavy-duty-machine-base

    I generally find machines are too low for back comfort so raising them is a good thing for me, it woud also give some height allowing use of a recycled pallet duck board
    That's an interesting idea....I will give that some thought. At 6'3 the idea of the lathe being raised up a little sounds very good!

    Quote Originally Posted by Neale View Post
    I've used those feet on my bandsaw and milling machine and they work well for levelling. Lathes can be a bit fussier, though. How stiff is the cabinet - would it be happier supported at 6 points rather than 4? Will the cabinet itself distort? How many mounting points did the manufacturer provide? I would be inclined to go for 4 as that makes the levelling and calibration easier. Not that I can talk - my lathe sits on thin MDF and ply packing...
    Well the cabinets are 4mm welded steel, so I think they pretty solid. There are 4 holes in the base of each cabinet and I was thinking about just tapping these but looking at there location they seem a little to close to the centerline (along the length of the lathe) for me to feel comfortable. I was thinking I would drill and tap some new holes further out.

    Worth saying the lathe is currently not on the cabinets (still sat on the floor after picking it up!!) so drilling and tapping the holes is less of of a problem.

    I also just read that I should be levelling the lathe by shimming where the lathe attaches to the cabinets and not try and level it by adjusting the cabinets alone??

    So I guess I would level the cabinets first, stick the lathe on and then shim it to take out any twist in the bed?

    Thanks,

    Jim
    Last edited by cncJim; 28-10-2014 at 11:43 AM.

  6. #5
    Neale's Avatar
    Lives in Plymouth, United Kingdom. Last Activity: 4 Hours Ago Has been a member for 4-5 years. Has a total post count of 1,000. Received thanks 170 times, giving thanks to others 5 times.
    On my machines I used feet with stems that fitted through the clearance holes (mind you, that was 12mm on the milling machine anyway) and used nuts and washers each side to adjust and lock. That way, you don't need to turn the "bolt" in its foot - from memory, the feet I had didn't have a hex or square section to put a spanner on.

    As for shimming - depends on the design. My Myford sits on a welded steel cabinet base, rather lighter than yours. With that, because the cabinet is relatively flexible, you make sure you have taken any wobble out of the base, then the lathe has adjustments where it bolts to the cabinet. My "new" lathe is a heavy ex-toolroom machine that weighs around 2800lb on its cast iron base. In this case, the base is part of the stiffness of the lathe itself and the bed is bolted tight to the base. It's difficult to believe that there is any scope for twist in that lot, but the recommendation for setting up both lathes is the same. Stick a longish bit of steel in the chuck, and turn both ends (near to and furthest from the chuck). Ideally, you use a test bar which has a reduced diameter in the middle so you only turn short sections at both ends. Both ends are turned without moving the cross-slide. If both end up the same diameter, you're spot on. Otherwise, put a tiny amount of twist in by tweaking the feet/adjustment bolts and keep trying. Sounds like your machine is another variation - as you say, level the stand, then shim the lathe mounting. Sounds like the most fiddly option, though, but at least you only ever do it once! I guess you have a way to lift the lathe on to its stand that you could use while shimming?
    Last edited by Neale; 28-10-2014 at 12:10 PM.

  7. The Following User Says Thank You to Neale For This Useful Post:


  8. #6
    Hi Jim,
    I have the Amadeal 290V-FF, which is a similar weight to yours. The cabinets are substantial but the tray is only .8mm steel. I am currently modifying the tray to put a drain slope in it for the coolant. When I installed the machine I put down a ply frame round each cabinet and set the frame tops level as I could. Then removed the cabinets and filled the frames with self levelling compound (add a bit more PVA to the mix). The cabinets are rag-bolted to the floor. The tray is being modded by putting a 25mm platform under the bed at each end. I need to raise the bed from the chip tray to give me space to clean out swarf. When I put it all back together I will check the shimming.

    I would like the whole machine to be lower as I have to sit to work. I can't stand for long due to arthritis, but I suppose the answer is a higher chair.

    Cheers,

    Rob

  9. The Following User Says Thank You to cropwell For This Useful Post:


  10. #7
    Last edited by EddyCurrent; 28-10-2014 at 06:51 PM.
    Spelling mistakes are not intentional, I only seem to see them some time after I've posted

  11. #8
    Jim, Tom in the US did a two part video on this, check out the videos below, you should end up walking away knowing exactly what to do:

    Leveling and Setup of the Metalworking lathe

    Part 1:
    http://youtu.be/zIDL77qt1tI

    Part 2:
    http://youtu.be/GErhXyUb2Go

    .Me
    .Me

  12. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Lee Roberts For This Useful Post:


  13. #9
    cncJim's Avatar
    Lives in Reading, United Kingdom. Last Activity: 2 Weeks Ago Has been a member for 4-5 years. Has a total post count of 170. Received thanks 15 times, giving thanks to others 32 times.
    Quote Originally Posted by Neale View Post
    On my machines I used feet with stems that fitted through the clearance holes (mind you, that was 12mm on the milling machine anyway) and used nuts and washers each side to adjust and lock. That way, you don't need to turn the "bolt" in its foot - from memory, the feet I had didn't have a hex or square section to put a spanner on.
    Ah ok, thats a good idea - Saves having to tap the holes!

    Quote Originally Posted by Neale View Post
    As for shimming - depends on the design. My Myford sits on a welded steel cabinet base, rather lighter than yours. With that, because the cabinet is relatively flexible, you make sure you have taken any wobble out of the base, then the lathe has adjustments where it bolts to the cabinet. My "new" lathe is a heavy ex-toolroom machine that weighs around 2800lb on its cast iron base. In this case, the base is part of the stiffness of the lathe itself and the bed is bolted tight to the base. It's difficult to believe that there is any scope for twist in that lot, but the recommendation for setting up both lathes is the same. Stick a longish bit of steel in the chuck, and turn both ends (near to and furthest from the chuck). Ideally, you use a test bar which has a reduced diameter in the middle so you only turn short sections at both ends. Both ends are turned without moving the cross-slide. If both end up the same diameter, you're spot on. Otherwise, put a tiny amount of twist in by tweaking the feet/adjustment bolts and keep trying. Sounds like your machine is another variation - as you say, level the stand, then shim the lathe mounting. Sounds like the most fiddly option, though, but at least you only ever do it once! I guess you have a way to lift the lathe on to its stand that you could use while shimming?
    Just spotted the same operation in the video's Lee linked to. Perfect. As for lifting it to shim, I have a 2 ton engine crane so it should do the job. :)

    Quote Originally Posted by cropwell View Post
    Hi Jim,
    I have the Amadeal 290V-FF, which is a similar weight to yours. The cabinets are substantial but the tray is only .8mm steel. I am currently modifying the tray to put a drain slope in it for the coolant. When I installed the machine I put down a ply frame round each cabinet and set the frame tops level as I could. Then removed the cabinets and filled the frames with self levelling compound (add a bit more PVA to the mix). The cabinets are rag-bolted to the floor. The tray is being modded by putting a 25mm platform under the bed at each end. I need to raise the bed from the chip tray to give me space to clean out swarf. When I put it all back together I will check the shimming.

    I would like the whole machine to be lower as I have to sit to work. I can't stand for long due to arthritis, but I suppose the answer is a higher chair.

    Cheers,

    Rob
    Yes, our machines do sound similar. The tray on mine is also thin but at least already has a slope to it with drain holes. I like the idea of putting down a self leveled pad for the lathe to sit on (sounds the best way...) but I am not sure I will keep the lathe in its current location. I have a feeling it will move a couple of time around the garage before I am happy with it!


    Quote Originally Posted by Lee Roberts View Post
    Jim, Tom in the US did a two part video on this, check out the videos below, you should end up walking away knowing exactly what to do:

    Leveling and Setup of the Metalworking lathe

    Part 1:
    http://youtu.be/zIDL77qt1tI

    Part 2:
    http://youtu.be/GErhXyUb2Go

    .Me
    That is great Lee, thanks for the links. Its one thing knowing the steps to complete a job but it really help being able to see someone do it first! Also the bit about the use and calibration of the levels was great! I guess I need to get myself a precision level. Does anyone have any recomendations? I see quite a few old ones on ebay.....

  14. #10
    I looked at precision levels and, as an amateur, I thought they are pricey for something I won't use much.
    Then I got to thinking..... Why should a lathe be exactly level ? Everything is relative to the axis of the lathe. Basically you want the headstock to point to the tailstock and the carriage to tram to the axis.
    So you need to ensure the bed is not distorted. No twist sag or bow. You also need to ensure that cutting forces don't cause distortion.
    A lot of this checking could be done with a laser system that fits on the spindle pointing at a tailstock centre. If you can adjust out any wobble and get the laser to align on the axis when you turn the spindle 360deg then the first part is done. next you need to check the tool path is parallel to the axis by mounting a plate with a pinhole at tailstock centre and run the carriage up to the headstock. If the laser beam goes through the pinhole and shines on the tailstock the length of the travel, then all should be ok.
    Let me know (politely) if I have got it wrong, I am not an engineer.

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Machine couriers,lathe
    By deisel in forum Marketplace Discussion
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 04-04-2017, 05:01 PM
  2. Machine Feet.
    By IanS1 in forum Gantry/Router Machines & Building
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 15-08-2014, 09:41 PM
  3. Which is easier to machine on a manual lathe 12.9 or EN24 steel?
    By newtoid1986 in forum Metalwork Discussion
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 18-09-2013, 07:20 PM
  4. CNC style lathe home brew Lathe for drilling and cutting.
    By Bodge in forum Lathes, Lathe Rebuilding & Conversions
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 18-04-2012, 10:45 AM
  5. 4th Axis running as CNC lathe using milling machine
    By Jonathan in forum Milling Machines, Builds & Conversions
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 21-08-2011, 10:34 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •