Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
  1. #11
    Although I have limited CNC, I am generally considered fairly expert when it comes to wood...., my thoughts on the above

    rule of thumb for cutting wood... depth of cut never greater than cutter diameter, to a maximum of shaft diameter... so 4mm = max 4mm cut, for say 10mm with 1/4(6mm) shank = 1/4 etc.... obviously this is a catch all and can be pushed, but with this you will generally not break tooling, burn material or blunt tooling with rubbing, damage collets, and allows for better chip clearance.... although at less than 6mm this will often be an issue with cuts more than 2x dia. and up to 1/2" at more than 3x dia deep

    cutting speed is crucial with small cutters, at 4mm I would be running nearer 30000rmp and adjust depth and feed to suit... ie shallow & fast

  2. #12
    ooer ... i cut 10-12mm with a 6mm bit , maybe i should lighten up a bit :D

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by mike os View Post
    cutting speed is crucial with small cutters, at 4mm I would be running nearer 30000rmp and adjust depth and feed to suit... ie shallow & fast
    You'll probably pay a premium for a decent size spindle to run at this speed, mine can run at 24k but it was quite a bit more expensive than the 18k model.
    Spelling mistakes are not intentional, I only seem to see them some time after I've posted

  4. #14
    24k is not bad tbh... more in reference to running at 12k.. :-)

  5. #15
    I suggested 16500 to 18000 rpm earlier because that seems to be a sweet spot on my machine, (16500 especially) it gives a good finish on the smallest cutters in hardwood and less tool wear (cuts per second).
    Spelling mistakes are not intentional, I only seem to see them some time after I've posted

  6. #16
    balancing cuter speed, DOC and feed is the key I think, but generally low cutter speeds (peripheral /curcumferencial speed- varies with diameter) is an important consideration... when I get consulted on poor performance/finish on router & spindle moulder work it is nearly always running too slow, usually because the operator is inexperienced or scared of the tool.... should not be a problem with CNC though I don't think

  7. #17
    Thanks guys, the missing steps issue turned out to be the pinions slipping, ill try running it at 24,000 rpm and higher feed rate and see if that improves the cut quality.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Similar Threads

  1. So, what am I missing?
    By Davek0974 in forum 3D Printing Machines
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 25-02-2014, 12:52 PM
  2. clunks / missing steps - DM856 and single pulse operation
    By dsc in forum Motor Drivers & Controllers
    Replies: 37
    Last Post: 09-12-2013, 02:22 PM
  3. Strange problem, possibly missing steps?
    By Philly in forum Chinese Machines
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 26-10-2012, 06:36 PM
  4. Boxford TCL 125 missing software
    By Boxster in forum Boxford Lathes
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 03-07-2012, 06:21 PM
  5. Missing Steps + Stalling X-axis
    By danielbriggs in forum Linear & Rotary Motion
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 02-09-2010, 02:59 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •