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  1. #11
    Ger21's Avatar
    Lives in Detroit, United States. Last Activity: 13 Hours Ago Has been a member for 5-6 years. Has a total post count of 508. Received thanks 68 times, giving thanks to others 0 times. Referred 1 members to the community.
    Quote Originally Posted by EddyCurrent View Post
    Yes but I bet I can cut them by hand faster.
    Not if you have the right software.
    This only took 5 minutes. It would take longer just to lay them out if doing by hand.

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    Gerry
    ______________________________________________
    UCCNC 2017 Screenset

    Mach3 2010 Screenset

    JointCAM - CAM for Woodworking Joints

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  3. #12
    Cool nice mod Eddy. What do you make with your machine? Furniture?
    CNC routing and prototyping services www.cncscotland.co.uk

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  5. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by gavztheouch View Post
    Cool nice mod Eddy. What do you make with your machine? Furniture?
    Firewood
    Spelling mistakes are not intentional, I only seem to see them some time after I've posted

  6. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by EddyCurrent View Post
    Firewood
    Ha ha, well at least you will have plenty of supplies for that workshop stove.
    CNC routing and prototyping services www.cncscotland.co.uk

    ADD ME ON FACEBOOKS

  7. #15
    I'm new here and don't want to hijack your thread. I hope you'll excuse my question which is related to your thread. I'm planing on making my first CNC router with the initial goal of cutting woodwork joints. Until I read your post I was considering making a machine with a spindle mounted on a bearing to allow it to rotate from being vertical or horizontal. My thoughts were that I would find it easier to clamp and align my workpieces horizontally to a raised work surface on the bed than vertically. This would also allow me to machine joints in the ends of long workpieces (2 m in length for beds for example). Have you ever seen a spindle like this and am I mad to consider it?

  8. #16
    Spelling mistakes are not intentional, I only seem to see them some time after I've posted

  9. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by Allan View Post
    My thoughts were that I would find it easier to clamp and align my workpieces horizontally to a raised work surface on the bed than vertically. This would also allow me to machine joints in the ends of long workpieces (2 m in length for beds for example). Have you ever seen a spindle like this and am I mad to consider it?
    Not Mad but not as easy has you think to do and keep a ridgid and accurate machine. The link eddy posted is to a 5 axis machine that is both expensive and complex to build, let alone generate G-code. Certainly not something I would advise any one new to CNC to dream about taking on for a first machine.!

    The problem with rotating spindles is the accurecy needed in the rotation device to keep the spindle so it's perfectly aligned in 2 planes. Sounds easy to just flip the spindle horizontal then back again.! But in practise there's quite a lot of time invested in setting up your spindle so it cuts true in both X & Y planes and gives a nice flat bottom cut parallel to the bed surface.
    So any spinning device will need to be very well engineered so it's repeatable if want any decent accuracy. Then you have the fact you'll need to spin it 90deg in 2 planes to be of any use which adds to the complexity.!!

    While I see why or the appeal of what you want then NO it's certainly not something you want to be taking on for a first machine believe me.! . . . The machine design Eddy used is a good tried tested design with one exception in that it he should have listened to his uncle Jazz and made the top rails longer. . . (Soz eddy couldn't resist) and used the end of the bed for clamping.!

  10. #18
    Thanks Eddy and uncle Jazz. I really like the system you built into the base of your machine Eddy - thanks for sharing it. The idea I had for rotating the spindle is as uncle Jazz describes. I'll put together a drawing and post it on a new thread where hopefully some members will throw some mud at it. I was thinking of using strong and accurate bearings in a housing like the fixed end of a ball screw. Thanks again for your inspiration and showing what you've done. I'll have a look at Eddy's build log.

  11. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by JAZZCNC View Post
    The machine design Eddy used is a good tried tested design with one exception in that it he should have listened to his uncle Jazz and made the top rails longer. . . (Soz eddy couldn't resist) and used the end of the bed for clamping.!
    You won't be laughing when I put a rotary table in the same hole
    Allan, with regard to your idea, I would sort out how the software is going to work first.
    Last edited by EddyCurrent; 24-12-2014 at 02:48 PM.
    Spelling mistakes are not intentional, I only seem to see them some time after I've posted

  12. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by Ger21 View Post
    Not if you have the right software.
    Gerry, I hadn't forgot about your software but l'm writing some applicable scripts for CamBam first, if the outcome is bad however I know where to come.
    Spelling mistakes are not intentional, I only seem to see them some time after I've posted

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