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  1. #21
    I'm stepping outside the OP's question but -
    Having a cutoff saw, band saw and power hacksaw I have to say that the power hacksaw get's most use as it will cut anything and can be left unattended to do it's job,
    Nick
    You think that's too expensive? You're not a Model Engineer are you? :D

  2. #22
    Neale's Avatar
    Lives in Plymouth, United Kingdom. Last Activity: 11 Hours Ago Has been a member for 5-6 years. Has a total post count of 1,156. Received thanks 209 times, giving thanks to others 5 times.
    Can't you do the same with the bandsaw, Nick? I'm also in the market at the moment for something like this and I'm leaning towards the bandsaw (slower but quieter, no sparks/mess) rather than cutoff saw partly because I've been assuming that "let it run and get on with something else" is true. There aren't a lot of choices out there for powered hacksaw, as far as I can see, in a "small workshop" size rather than ex-industrial big beasts which I couldn't house.

  3. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by Neale View Post
    Can't you do the same with the bandsaw, Nick?
    Neale,
    Probably, but my Manchester Power Hack Saw (which has a similar footprint and volume to a small band saw) cut cast iron, titanium, stainless steel and anything else I threw at it up to 6" OD for over a year on a single Sheffield made blade ;-)

    - Nick
    Last edited by magicniner; 17-01-2017 at 09:27 PM.
    You think that's too expensive? You're not a Model Engineer are you? :D

  4. #24
    I've got a hacksaw like in the link bellow and I am pretty happy. Like a lot of this kind of machinery, it is not perfect, it has a few minor design faults, but nevertheless, it works. It cuts pretty much square, but the finish is not as clean as with a cut off saw, a few burrs, that's all. It's slower than a bandsaw. But as people have said, bandsaw blades can wonder a bit and the cut may not be square.

    It is a bit noisy, low pitch noise, and the grip tends to mark the material a little if not protected. Other than that, it's safe, it can be left alone to do the job. I am still on the first blade after regularly cutting aluminium for two years.

    Edward

    http://www.axminster.co.uk/axminster...hacksaw-200024
    Last edited by Edward; 18-01-2017 at 10:56 AM.

  5. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by paulus.v View Post
    Hi Boyan, I cannot fully agree with you.
    There are a lot of different grades of micrograin carbide. You cannot say that a tool made of chinese carbide has the same quality as a Swiss or Japanese one. Even with the same carbide grain size and amount of cobalt used, the difference in manufacturing techniques will give different results of the properties of the resulting material.

    I bet that your Rage blade is the "made in japan" version
    I used mainly 3mm and 6mm bits on my CNC for a couple of years/ now 12mm mostly/ . 6mm Kyocera micrograin carbide which is maybe the finest example of carbide tool and super polished, was my golden stabndard. will cut as 5 times as long as Freud similar tool. Now i buy chinese ones that cut as 1/3rd as more than the Kyocera. Kyocera 25-30 euro per bit new. Chinese 4 euro.

    But just FYI now i try to use mainly insert tools. OMG, they last forever !!! The best carbide possible, look at CMT. And cut perfectly.

    Quote Originally Posted by magicniner View Post
    Neale,
    Probably, but my Manchester Power Hack Saw (which has a similar footprint and volume to a small band saw) cut cast iron, titanium, stainless steel and anything else I threw at it up to 6" OD for over a year on a single Sheffield made blade ;-)

    - Nick
    Hack saw is the cheapest and best saw possible. Almost no material loss and will cut everything. Finding a good cheap one as the Rage Pro is another matter. And the rage pro speed is tremendous, if you are counting your time.


    I have a small bandsaw but i dont use it as the blades brake too much due to short length and twist
    project 1 , 2, Dust Shoe ...

  6. #26
    Hi
    Having something that cuts off square is very useful, especially if you scrounge off cuts like, we do. We had a band at work and it was quite rubbish. Wasn't cheap and couldn't cut Ali square. We have great big one now which is really good but very expensive. I like the old reciprocating types, they are rare now. I got one free. It was being skipped because of a broken gear. I grabbed it (quite legally and with consent), it's a sealy last listed at 1000 or so, well beyond my means, rang Sealy and 12.50 got me a replacement gear. So my advice, keep your eyes open wide!
    Work threw out a lovely pre war band saw while I was on holiday, because it didn't have interlocks on the door! Eyes open wide. I guess you're not local to me but for a very small contribution (to pay for blades), you can use mine for free. Capacity is 20cm x 20cm.

    I wouldn't buy the 45 degree bad type again.

    T
    Sherline lathe, Chester DB11V lathe, Myford/ Rodney mill, CNC mill Isel/ home made, Sealy Hack Saw, Meddings Pillar drill.

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