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  1. #1
    Rye's Avatar
    Lives in Sheffield, United Kingdom. Last Activity: 2 Weeks Ago Has been a member for 2-3 years. Has a total post count of 48. Received thanks 4 times, giving thanks to others 0 times.
    Hey all,

    I'm new to CNC and need some advice on ways to avoid or limit tear-out. I'm using a Chinese CNC6040 with a 1.5k spindle and two end-mill bits that came with the machine: 6mm and a 3mm to carve a couple of name plaques on a few scrap planks of softwood(I don't want to be using any expensive material yet as I'm a complete noob.)

    On my first attempt, using the pocket toolpath in vcarve, I used offset and conventional. This came out reasonable well but left very noticeable tool marks on the base of the pocket and quite a bit of tear-out around the lettering. My second attempt, using raster and climb(upcut), came out much better. It had fewer tool marks and less tear-out - although it did leave a little more fuzz.

    I expect a few problems like this when using softwood, but what advice would you give to help limit the tear-out. And what spindle speeds, feed rate and cut-depth would you recommend (the pocket is only 5mm deep. I used 3 passes with the last being 0.3mm.)

    Cheers,
    Rye

  2. #2
    Hi,

    Quote Originally Posted by Rye View Post
    came out reasonable well but left very noticeable tool marks on the base of the pocket
    marks at the bottom are usually caused by misalignment of the spindle (not exactly perpendicular to the machine base).

    Quote Originally Posted by Rye View Post
    but what advice would you give to help limit the tear-out.
    If wood tears out the tool is usually just not sharp enough. Tools desinged to cut steel for examle are dull by design in comparison to tools made for wood or plastics. There are also large differences between cheap and high quality tools.

    Christian
    2D / 3D CAM Software and CNC controller: http://www.estlcam.com

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  4. #3
    Rye's Avatar
    Lives in Sheffield, United Kingdom. Last Activity: 2 Weeks Ago Has been a member for 2-3 years. Has a total post count of 48. Received thanks 4 times, giving thanks to others 0 times.
    Hi mate,

    Thanks for replying. As I said I'm new to all this and kind of in at the deep end. Trying to soak up as much info as possible. I'm guessing the tool marks may have been because my spoiler board was springing up a little in the middle. I've got that sorted now and they've pretty much cleared up(just very minor abrasions.)

    I've ordered some new bits but, until they arrive, I'm just experimenting and trying to gain some confidence using the machine with bits that came with it. My biggest problem is trying to get my head around speed and feed rates. I was thinking if I can get those roughly right I'd be able to limit some of the problems above. That's why I thought I'd ask you guys if you have any tips or advice.

    Thanks again,
    Rye

  5. #4
    Hello,
    Just jumping in on this - I am at the exact same stage, I am using the end mill bit that came with the 3040 router I just got and am driving it around some soft pine at the moment.
    It's all going OK but like you I am experimenting with feed rates etc.
    I am getting very rough top edges in as much as it is not a nice clean cut - the internal walls of the cuts are really smooth but it leaves a burr most of the way around the top.
    I have learnt that there are bits for down cutting and up cutting. I have no idea what I am using, I suspect I will just need to go and get a decent end mill cutter for wood. I am thinking that a 'down cutter' will work best for me in terns of having the clean top edge.
    Does any of this sound familiar?
    Kind regards
    Richard

  6. #5
    You could use a ramped profile with very shallow DOC to mark the slot to around 2mm depth prior to cutting it, a bit like using a marking knife in conventional woodwork to prevent torn surface edges on saw cuts.
    Last edited by magicniner; 03-01-2018 at 01:22 PM.
    You think that's too expensive? You're not a Model Engineer are you? :D

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  8. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by magicniner View Post
    You could use a ramped profile with very shallow DOC to mark the slot to around 2mm depth prior to cutting it, a bit like using a marking knife in conventional woodwork to prevent torn surface edges on saw cuts.
    That does make sense though the software that I am currently using to generate gCode does not support that.
    I will look in to CNCUSB as that allows some creation of code independently.
    Here is a picture of the kind of thing I am experiencing:

    Click image for larger version. 

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    I suspect that if I 'face off' the entire piece after this work then the problem will be removed but I am just wondering, should it be like this? Is it the wood? Is it the tool? Is it the feed rate or speed?

    Kind regards
    Richard

  9. #7
    Ger21's Avatar
    Lives in Detroit, United States. Last Activity: 3 Hours Ago Has been a member for 5-6 years. Has a total post count of 563. Received thanks 77 times, giving thanks to others 0 times. Referred 1 members to the community.
    A downcut spiral is what you want to use.
    Gerry
    ______________________________________________
    UCCNC 2017 Screenset

    Mach3 2010 Screenset

    JointCAM - CAM for Woodworking Joints

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  11. #8
    Sometimes if I want a small chamfer around the pocket I do an engrave cut first with a V tool, this leaves a nice edge but I only use hardwood and that always leaves a better edge than pine anyway.
    A straight flute cutter would be better than the one you use at the moment or as suggested a down spiral generally works best.
    These cutters give me good results at great prices; https://www.toolstation.com/shop/Pow...er+Bits/sd2579
    Spelling mistakes are not intentional, I only seem to see them some time after I've posted

  12. #9
    Hello and thank you for that - I have been looking around at tools trying to find a downcut one - so far I have only found down+up cot ones which I don't think is what I want.
    Might you be able to point me in a suitable direction - perhaps to a recommended supplier?
    Kind regards
    Richard

  13. #10
    Thank you for that - I shall head over there now.

    I am only playing on the soft wood at present but I will take a look at the down spiral bit to see how that improves things.
    Kind regards
    Richard

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