Thread: CAD/CAM Buddies

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  1. #21
    I started with Autocad 2.6 in the mid 1980's, and still only really do 2 1/2 D at best! I'm going to put my toe in the water with Fusion360 which will be quite a different kettle of fish being 'proper' 3D ! At the moment I'm using an old version of FeatureCAM but my CNC'ing is relatively simple stuff.

    I suppose your surf boards are going to be the merging of various curved surfaces extruded from 2D ?

  2. #22
    i tried fashion360 but couldn't get my head round it on my own so let me know if you have any luck!

    the surfboard i do i draw a outline in the plan view then a side profile to get what we call the rocker and then insert slices down the board to give the shape of the top, bottom and rails. it then takes that and turns it into a 3d drawing and then even creates the g code to cut it out so its a all in one package.It is called Shape3d. I have used it to do various other things but its is a bit restricted to single sided symmetrical stuff. I wish i could find a similar program to do other things on.

  3. #23
    I guess most 3D Cad/Cam programmes are a big learning curve. However using a fully integrated Cad, Cam and postprocessor really simplifies many of the stages. I am all Mach3 and F360 does this job admirably. Couple up to the support videos,forums and zero purchase price. It became a no brainer to me.
    If you begin simply and resist the temptation to get ahead of yourself you will be fine. Cut some primitive shapes, then modify them. Perhaps engrave a little text etc. Jumping prematurely into "useful" work will probably burst a few blood vessels.
    Take it slowly you will get there and still have some hair left.
    You can always ask on here too!!

  4. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by Leadhead View Post
    I guess most 3D Cad/Cam programmes are a big learning curve. However using a fully integrated Cad, Cam and postprocessor really simplifies many of the stages. I am all Mach3 and F360 does this job admirably. Couple up to the support videos,forums and zero purchase price. It became a no brainer to me.
    If you begin simply and resist the temptation to get ahead of yourself you will be fine. Cut some primitive shapes, then modify them. Perhaps engrave a little text etc. Jumping prematurely into "useful" work will probably burst a few blood vessels.
    Take it slowly you will get there and still have some hair left.
    You can always ask on here too!!
    i will have to give it another go i tried just using google sketch up the other day and that got me no were. I did down load f360 but the trial ran out even though i did as it said to get the free version so will have to try again. I don't mind paying for a program if it was as easy to use as my surfboard one which although was a lot it makes life so easy!

  5. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by charlieuk View Post
    i will have to give it another go i tried just using google sketch up the other day and that got me no were. I did down load f360 but the trial ran out even though i did as it said to get the free version so will have to try again. I don't mind paying for a program if it was as easy to use as my surfboard one which although was a lot it makes life so easy!
    Charlie,

    I use fusion as a Second pass program. As I am very well versed in Creo/Pro-e and Inventor, it makes sense to work in those to build the 3D models.

    Fusion allows the import of so many file types it is very easy to bring a model in and then just use the CAM side of it.

    For your application, you may benefit from learning how to build free form surfaces in Fusion if you want to use it as cad. This is not as difficult as it sounds it just takes time and knowing what to look for. You can also use the flexible modeling elements where you create nodes on a primitive (eg, sphere, box, torus) and pull them into a known shape.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lt7mD8ErvJY

    With your existing CAD, can you export a 3d DXF file? If so, you may be one step ahead of the game.

    There also is the option to create "loft" features between strategically placed sketches. You create sketching planes at known distances from each other and place a x-section sketch on each one. you then extrude between them. Not sure if it gives you full control over the final object but it can be a start.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QJCtZ0-St_I

    Then the cam stuff is simple in comparison.
    https://emvioeng.com
    Machine tools and 3D printing supplies. Expanding constantly.

  6. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by komatias View Post
    Charlie,

    I use fusion as a Second pass program. As I am very well versed in Creo/Pro-e and Inventor, it makes sense to work in those to build the 3D models.

    Fusion allows the import of so many file types it is very easy to bring a model in and then just use the CAM side of it.

    For your application, you may benefit from learning how to build free form surfaces in Fusion if you want to use it as cad. This is not as difficult as it sounds it just takes time and knowing what to look for. You can also use the flexible modeling elements where you create nodes on a primitive (eg, sphere, box, torus) and pull them into a known shape.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lt7mD8ErvJY

    With your existing CAD, can you export a 3d DXF file? If so, you may be one step ahead of the game.

    There also is the option to create "loft" features between strategically placed sketches. You create sketching planes at known distances from each other and place a x-section sketch on each one. you then extrude between them. Not sure if it gives you full control over the final object but it can be a start.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QJCtZ0-St_I

    Then the cam stuff is simple in comparison.
    i believe you can turn files to dxf but it is a part of the program i do not have and it is quite i belive, its not like a normal cad program though i can't i can basically only push and pull the out line of the surfboard and change cross sections and it has to be symmetrical like a surfboard.

    think i may need to look for a course or something a a local college, maybe it would make it a lot easier.

    many thanks
    Last edited by charlieuk; 19-01-2016 at 09:48 AM.

  7. #27
    does any one use rhino? looks like it has that 3 view way of drawing things I was after

  8. #28
    I am in Yeovil somerset, and a member of a few model engineering clubs. there is little or know interest in any of the them. would be nice to meet up and talk about cnc projects. I am new to all this. I have solidworks for design and mashcam for g code and mach3. but only just begaining to get my head round the cnc bit.

    If anyone in the area, please get in contact. thanks. michael

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